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Situation is as follows:

A user responds to another users request with some details of his offer. Some of these details are required (step 1) and some are optional, but help the requester even better (step 2). After these steps, the input he provided gets sent to the other user & saved for future inquiries, and the users are introduced in the chat to each other.

mockup

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What's the most clear way of communicating to the user, that in step 2, both actions send the user to the chat, while still trying to persuade the user to fill in the optional details aforementioned?

CTA's should be as concise & clear as possible, but I'm faced with the problem of putting 2 actions in 1 button to clearly indicate the next step for both CTA's, e.g. 'Save and chat' + 'Skip and chat'.

  • What is this chat for? Can you elaborate the use of this? It's difficult to suggest something with this little details. – Wanda Jan 26 '18 at 11:51
  • Sure! A user responds to another users request with some details of his offer. Some of these details are required (step 1) and some are optional, but help the requester even better (step 2). After these steps, the input he provided gets sent to the other user & saved for future inquiries, and the users are introduced in the chat to each other. – Rick P Jan 26 '18 at 12:18
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    In that case you may want to add a clear benefit for filling out step 2. Like: you will be helped faster because we don't have to ask this info then, or more people can find you or your offer. I wouldn't add a secondary CTA here. If you just use chat as a button and mark the fields as optional, you'll achieve the same goal with more focus. This way you'll catch the people who autopilot and fill in any form fully, while also catching those people who DONT do that and skip as much as they can. They need to know why they should bother. – Wanda Jan 26 '18 at 12:24
  • Okay, so the only concern I have if people understand if the second step is optional in that solution, with the fear that they just bounce instead of not filling in the optional steps & just enter the chat. But that's something that can be tested! Thanks – Rick P Jan 26 '18 at 13:23
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I was struggling with almost the same problem (see my post). In the end it became clear to me that with a more direct approach a skip button is not necessary.

I liked the solution where you don't repeat the final goal (starting the chat) and instead of adding a skip button, making the skippable screen optional:

add some details link

PRO: quicker interaction for people who do not want to add details, one clear CTA.

CON: the user does not see what he/she is skipping. The link could be missed.


When I did some more design work I came to a different solution for my specific case. I was very important to me that the user would actually see what he or she is skipping. This would be my solution:

enter image description here

PRO: the details are initially set to "I don't want to tell you" (or something like that) so the user immediately sees that he/she does not need to answer. Every screen has just one clear CTA and no additional function.

CON: one extra screen for people who already know they don't want to fill in the details, more inputs = higher chance of leaving the form

  • i.stack.imgur.com/VydQk.png Why not like that? The action we want the user to do is add this additional data, but we leave him a possibility to go straight to the chat. Also, the label on CTA button is suggesting that the user can just skip it. – Ada Jan 27 '18 at 14:34
  • Because then the visual semantics would not be correct/intuitive. The flow would not be logic as you read from top to bottom and visually the link is also less heavy than the button. In your version the link has a major action (leaving the form and not being able to add details) and the button has a minor action (add details and then go to chat). – laEm Jan 29 '18 at 9:55
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What if you just put "Continue" and "Skip" as your two buttons, without mentioning chat? I assume that you've already set expectations that the process leads to a chat, so both "Continue" and "Skip" should imply that one would get to the chat either way.

Of course, the only way to know for sure is to conduct user testing on this.

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