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Not sure if I am asking this question in the right forum

I am a web designer currently searching for a job. I have really good portfolio and work experience and when applying for a job, almost everyone calls me for the interview. But I often fail in test projects (when they give you task to design at home). I provide high quality work and really trying hard, so I'm interested if there is something I miss

What do employers want to see in test project? Are there some things to keep in mind?

closed as primarily opinion-based by Shreyas Tripathy, locationunknown, JonW Nov 6 '17 at 12:21

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • This isn't really the forum for career advice but I will tell you that when I am looking at applications I look for evidence that the candidate understands design processes and demonstrates that in their portfolio. For design tasks I look for candidates who have documented the process and reasoning behind their design decisions - like math homework: you need to show your workings. – Andrew Martin Nov 6 '17 at 8:27
  • The journey is more important than the outcome. They want to see what are the steps you took to solve the problem. How you go about solving them. Explain your thought process and of course, your polish visuals are icing on the cake. – adamsoh Nov 6 '17 at 8:28
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Are you applying for more visually oriented or research oriented jobs? Depending on which, you will have to tailor your portfolio to reflect those skills. If you pass the initial portfolio review but fail the test project part, you may be reading briefings wrong, or focusing on the wrong aspects or not documenting your work and train of thoughts enough. They want to know your process, not just the end result.

The best way to figure out what is going wrong is to call the interviewer back and ask him for constructive criticism. If you emphasise you just want to improve yourself so you'll be a more interesting candidate, I'm sure they'll be willing to give some pointers.

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