9

When users unsubscribe from our service we ask them why and give several reasons to choose from and a custom field to type the answer. Usually companies name the custom field "Other"

We don't really agree that it's a good customer experience. It seems too old-fashioned. Maybe it would be better if it sounded more humane and natural, like "Let me tell you:" or "Here's why"

What do you think?

enter image description here

enter image description here

  • 8
    The short answer is you are not going with what everyone is accustomed to - I personally would never do what you have mentioned. I think I'd pick "Other" vs what you are recommending. – JonH Oct 13 '17 at 15:20
  • 4
    Not related to your question, but that title text needs to read: "It won't be the same without you." The user has already indicated that they're leaving, so you don't want a conditional. – Cody Gray Oct 13 '17 at 17:20
  • @CodyGray One of the buttons at the end of the page is "Keep my plan". This means he hasn't cancelled it yet, at least not fully. In my opinion, "wouldn't" is correct. Besides, the site certainly doesn't want the user to leave, so it's better to word the message in a way that makes it clear that they can still change their minds. Not that the wording will really help, of course, but why not giving it a try? – Fabio says Reinstate Monica Oct 13 '17 at 18:45
  • 8
    FWIW the alternatives of "here's why" or "let me tell you" feel a bit like the website putting words into the visitor's mouth. Sometimes "making it personal" is not what a user wants, especially when trying to provide criticism. – Darren Ringer Oct 13 '17 at 20:01
38

The choice "Other" is a very neutral and well-established term which most people quickly understand. If I saw "Let me tell you why:" as an option then I would have to think twice about what it implies.

I recommend reading Steve Krug's book Don't Make Me Think

If an analogy helps then your suggestion is akin to renaming the common hammer into "Nail Impaler".

If you "must" change "Other" into something else then make sure that it sounds neutral.

|improve this answer|||||
  • When you are a nail impaler, everything looks like a nail... kinda rolls of the tongue, don't you think? ;) – JeffC Oct 15 '17 at 18:50
14

I wouldn't do this for one simple reason: it might become an outlet for your customer's emotions. An 'other' box stays within the rational spheres; as a user you're being asked for a reason, you're not being asked about how you feel about the reason for canceling.

When you ask people why they cancel a subscription it often has a negative reason: "too expensive", "doesn't do what I want to do with it". Giving predefined answers lets you stay within the sphere of rationalisation and arguments. It also helps you pinpoint why you are losing subscriptions.

Giving a 'Let me tell you' or 'Here's why' option would probably call upon a user's emotional state about the canceling too much. You'd get an emotional response which is much harder to process and might cement their decision to dislike your service. They'd be reliving the experience so to speak as they are writing their emotions down.

|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    we give options like 6 of them, "other" is the last of them. you made a good point here. but what if the reason this person is leaving is not one of the 6 we listed? he might also be angry then... – Oksi Oct 13 '17 at 12:16
  • 4
    That's why you still add 'other'. People are much more likely to translate their reason of leaving into an actual unlisted argument, than an emotional rant. – Wanda Oct 13 '17 at 12:35
2

You're already asking them to tell you why by giving them this menu. Having an option "let me tell you" implies that if they choose "let me tell you", they can tell you why they're leaving, but if they choose, say, "I only needed it for a limited time", then they aren't telling you. If you want another option, you could name it something like "none of these fit" or "I have an answer that isn't listed".

|improve this answer|||||

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.