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I have an optional form that is presented as a dialog box prompting for some information. The user can choose to fill this out and click submit, ignore it this time, or choose to never be prompted again.

Would it be better to have a button for cancel, a button for submit and a checkbox for "Never ask me again" or to have three buttons, one for 'ignore for now', one for submit, and another for 'never ask me again'?

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As a checkbox, tied to your action button.

enter image description here

Remember the checkbox is a choice based on the action (hence, tied to the button). The system should always offer to remember preferences on common actions in order to avoid repetition. However, "remember" is not an user interaction, but a system feature. Therefore, adding a button for a non-existent interaction will be quite confusing and overkill.

This is a pretty common feature, a simple searc on google image shown these as first results

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  • I'm honestly surprised by this. It feels counter intuitive to me. Personally I expect all Cancel buttons to throw away all input. Checkbox is an input, therefore, if I click cancel, I expect it to throw away the "don't ask me again" input and actually ask me again. – slf Aug 4 '17 at 16:14
  • Good point! However, keep in mind that in this case, the action is the one that triggered the dialog window, so if you hit cancel button , it won't clear the input, but it will simple ignore its existence, since the checkbox will be tied to the action. If you cancel the action, there won't be anything to remember, hence why I said the checkbox is tied to the action button – Devin Aug 4 '17 at 16:36
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It depends on if and how you need to re-prompt the user.

If the system needs the info...

You're required to re-prompt the user anyway. If the buttons are "Not now" and "Submit," the re-prompting is implicit in the button labels. The user will be prompted again if they click "Not now."

Will you be prompting the user with the same dialog if they submit their info? If so, why?

If the system doesn't need info...

The checkbox for "Don't ask again" can be there regardless of whether or not the user wants to add info because the system doesn't require that they do (ie. there's no need to re-prompt regardless of their desire to enter info). Having two buttons ("No thanks" and "Submit") with a "Don't ask again" checkbox is the right approach because it gives the user the ability to do what they want twice (fill/ignore and see again/never see again) with a single instance of the form.

However...

As with almost every question on UX StackExchange, more detail about the goals (both user and system) would allow for answering the question with greater confidence and detail.

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