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I'm thinking of showing several images of the product on the cart page, And I'm wondering what is the best approach to implement this feature in desktop and mobile?

An option could be adding left & right arrows to the image thumbnail so the customer can swipe between product images.

also if you have a website example, please share the link.

Thanks,

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    Why are you thinking of doing this? – DarrylGodden Jul 19 '17 at 10:34
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A personal plea from a former eCommerce business owner: Please don't. The sole focus is to get them through checkout to hit the 'Place Your Order' button.

From Neilsen Norman: Decision Making in the E-Commerce Shopping Cart: 4 Tips for Supporting Users

Within a checkout process, sites need to keep the focus on purchasing, eliminating distractions that might keep the user from making a purchase.

From the baymard institute: A Consistent Shopping Experience With Product Thumbnails

So while your e-commerce site should feature a wide array of different product image types on each product page, the checkout thumbnail should in (almost) every case be the first image in your product image gallery – the one that is shown to the customer by default.

They follow this with a good piece of advice about a specific product variant

A more common mistake is using the same thumbnail for all product variations despite an obvious aesthetic difference. For example if a customer selects a “Blue” variation of a t-shirt but sees a thumbnail of a red tee in the cart, she may think she selected the wrong variation or that there’s an error on the site – even if the variation “Blue” is written in clear text in the cart description.

This report place emphasis on the need for and the right product thumbnail, but also cautions:

Product thumbnails tend to stand out and demand the customer’s attention, which means that careful implementation is required to avoid inadvertently distracting the customer from the page’s other elements – such as a “Place order” button.

From personal experience in eCommerce (just my opinion).

I'm a former eCommerce business owner. I spent countless hours diving into shopping cart and checkout best practices. I have never seen or been given advice (from consultants and other business owners) to add more interactivity into the checkout process.

I also haven't seen any of the most popular eCommerce platforms offer this functionality by default, and I coded my own custom theme for my site at the time as well.

Every piece of research I read and listened to (articles, purchased reports, consultants) would focus on simplifying every step, from reducing the form fields, shipping / billing address defaults, order button placement, coupon code best practices, order button color, mobile shopping cart and checkout page; the list is exhaustive.

There are so many other crucial (and proven) small (and large) matters you can focus on to improve the shopping cart and checkout experience. Entire businesses revolve around improving this process.

As always, you can a/b test to see if this brings in added revenue, but there's many other areas to focus which could get you alot further. Time and resources are always limited.

  • Thank you for you answer that was really helpful, I totally agree with you about simplified the cart page. Still would be interesting to see if customers want to see more multiple images of the same product in the cart page since instead of going back to the Product details page. and as Bayamard report mensioned people use cart page as a comparison tool so having this feature might be helpful. – Ahmad Mansee Jul 19 '17 at 12:11
  • You can definitely a/b test (who knows, right?). My main concern is that if you are a consultant or in house designer, your time is limited. The good news is that there's a wealth of best practices for all aspects of the checkout and cart experience. – Mike M Jul 19 '17 at 12:14

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