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I want to understand how can I decide whether I should use a hero image or not.

Hero images provide a strong communication to the first time visitors of the site/app with a call to action. But they are all consuming and don't leave out space for the actual content- like the products on a e-commerce site.

I have a service-based online product: voggle.co. We currently have a hero image, but I am considering to have a small banner with the models' photos visible (along with the very important BOOK call to action). Similar to what airbnb on their homepage.

closed as too broad by Midas, Mayo, msanford, Nick Groeneveld, locationunknown Jul 17 '17 at 6:42

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    See astalabandi's answer. Like so much in UX, it depends. Depends on the site and its users, on the image, on the content, on the users. One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions, and testing things like whether to include an image, or which type of image to use, is about as basic as A/B testing gets. Come up with a test and find out the right answer for your site and your users. – dennislees Jul 14 '17 at 12:54
  • I think a great example would be most websites of fitness centers. Do they have a picture of a super buff dude/dudette, or a regular guy/girl you can relate to? I would prefer a regular guy in good shape because he looks like a slightly better version of me. But you might prefer super buff Terry Crewes guy because that is your dream --- it all depends! – astalabandi Jul 14 '17 at 13:19
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I think it depends on your core users/demographics. Some will be turned off by the hero image because they cannot relate to it. But proper use of a hero image could nudge your users to engage even more. My suggestion would be to do some A/B split tests. One with hero-image, one without. If hero wins, then you could split test different types of hero images, to find the one best suited for your "audience".

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Use minimalistic approach in the hero image

The concept behind a landing page is to brief the user about the application/website.

Initially, the landing page hero images were introduced to draw people's attention. But over time with increased focus on usability and user experience, the hero images have become increasingly minimalistic.

Examples:

Notice that only Github has an actual image as a background which is also very minimal in nature. So the image part of the hero image has changed.

Hope this helps

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