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I'm working on an a desktop application that is utilized by employees and their customers. Currently, we have two views in the application, each with their own set of 4-6 items in their navigation. One view is strictly for the employees to browse leads, view customer insights, and look up individuals. The other is a view that the employee and their customer can use together to access that customer's information, a set of products to review, forms to fill out, etc. Currently, we have a secured link in the top navigation bar that requires the employee's PIN to move to the secured area. This is how we toggle between the two views.

In this interaction, the employee is logged into their account and is driving the experience most of the time - the customer may might navigate some, but an employee is physically with them the whole time. When the customer approaches the employee, the employee needs to be able to switch to a view with no sensitive information and look up that customer to view their specific details and opportunities for them.

This is not an ideal situation, as it feels a little shoehorned into the navigation and it brings the customer's attention to a "forbidden" area.

Is there any sort of alternative treatment for this interaction?

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Sounds, like you are missing something. Isn't there a logic that divides what each should see? Access? It all sounds like the navigation is visible and global regardless of what token? Right?

I think, a wise idea would be to have built-in security logic, and then place navigation options separate for each group.

Imagine something like this:

enter image description here

EDIT 1: See this, UX best practice for role based access?

  • Ah, I should have elaborated more. In this interaction, the employee is logged into their account and is driving the experience most of the time - the customer may might navigate some, but an employee is physically with them the whole time. When the customer approaches the employee, the employee needs to be able to switch to a view with no sensitive information and look up that customer to view their specific details and opportunities for them. – R. Walsh Apr 28 '17 at 20:33
  • Yes. That would mean, like on some websites, they have live chat between support and customer, meaning an employee is there on the website serving the user, real-time all the time. The idea would be to switch like above, and use the name of the customer to look them up. Ideally, the employee should open a secure communication page and allow the customer to join through "In-site-instant-invite" functionality. – Brianna Violet Apr 28 '17 at 20:43

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