1

What is the name for a bar indicating an element can be swiped? These bars (boxed in red in the image below) are meant to indicate to the user that the element can be dragged or swiped.

These are not as common in more recent versions of iOS but are still present on some swipe-down and swipe-up menus.

iOS Control Center

iOS Notification Center

4

These icons are generally called "chevron" icons. Now, as you must already be aware, there are different kinds of chevron icons based on the context of the event.

For example, in the screenshot you've posted, the icon is called Chevron-down. Similarly, there are chevron-up, chevron-left and chevron-right icons for their respective usage.

Hope that helps.

  • I agree that the bent bar is a chevron icon, but there must me a more specific term that is exclusive to icons indicating an element can be swiped or dragged. To illustrate this, I added another screenshot from the iOS Notification Center that is indicating the same thing but is not in a chevron shape. – Tyler Apr 27 '17 at 18:17
  • but there must me a more specific term that is exclusive to icons indicating an element can be swiped or dragged - Nope. "Handle" would be the closest thing. – Evil Closet Monkey Apr 27 '17 at 18:35
  • I agree with Evil Closet Monkey. "Handle" is closest and most general thing you can relate this with. Even in your second example. In real world, handles are something which are used to open doors, drawers, windows etc, mainly to "reveal" something which was, otherwise, hidden. Apart from that, user plainclothes has give a great answer too, below. – Chandan Apr 28 '17 at 3:16
2

In general "interaction" terms, it's typically called a grabber, gripper, or one of those combined with handle.

It's a reference to the physical parallel as seen on this little switch.

enter image description here

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