0

Initially there are only 2 controls but, when there are options nearby for a user, an additional segment control pops up and displays options. How good is this ux. If this is bad, please help me with reasons.

2
  • 1
    Could you provide more details? Some mockup maybe? What you are talking about can be either beneficial or build uncertainty for the User depending on the particular case. Mar 30 '17 at 5:53
  • I mean: if properly applied, this additional control can be just contextual. Then it would be fine, maybe even the best solution to choose. But should it be unclear for the User why this control is sometimes there and sometimes not, then it can be distracting. Mar 30 '17 at 5:56
1

From what you write, I assume you want to use a segmented button control with 2 (standard case) or 3 (special case) segments. Please provide a sketch if my assumption is wrong.

I would recommend to look for alternatives, for these reasons:

  • People might be frustrated when they cannot easily understand why the available functions change.
  • Adding a segment will change the size of the segments. People who (like me) are "topological" will hit the wrong segment because they remember the position, not the label.

As for alternatives:

  • Always use three segments, deactivating the one which is unavailable.
  • You might even have it active, explaining when the function will be available.
  • Put the dynamic function elsewhere (you post is not specific enough for a more detailed suggestion)
0

Limit the number of segments to improve usability. Wider segments are easier to tap. On iPhone, a segmented control should have five or fewer segments.

See Apple's Human Interface Guideline for segmented controls for more info.

Segmented Controls

A segmented control is a linear set of two or more segments, each of which functions as a mutually exclusive button. Within the control, all segments are equal in width. Like buttons, segments can contain text or images. Segmented controls are often used to display different views. In Maps, for example, a segmented control lets you switch between Map, Transit, and Satellite views.

Limit the number of segments to improve usability. Wider segments are easier to tap. On iPhone, a segmented control should have five or fewer segments.

Try to keep segment content size consistent. Because all segments have equal width, it doesn’t look great if content fills some segments but not others.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.