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Thanks in advance, and sorry for my English if incorrect, and not knowing correct terms straight away.

Fist of all, let me try to explain what I mean by specialized professional software. Say there is some software for doing movies. There is MovieMaker as popular and intuitive product, and i don't mean it to be specialized professional. On the other hand, there might be software, which is very complicated and heavy, probably, expensive. Only proportionally small number of people (professionals) use it to make movies of high quality. This one is specialized professional software according to my self-made dictionary.

Is it a must for such 'specialized professional software' to not let user do any wrong actions?

Okay, let me try to explain, what I mean by a wrong action. For example, there is a software system for modelling physical processes. A wrong action would be if a user could model a square circle, which would spin on the ground just like a round circle.

I know, it sounds ridiculous, but perhaps since the software is specialized and professional, it should be the duty of professional user to insert a round circle instead of a square circle. Perhaps it is considered to be okay to allow wrong actions, since only a small number of people use it.

Is it considered okay for 'specialized professional software' to let the user perform wrong actions?

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    'Wrong actions' is a continuum from 'invisible, no impact' issue to 'delete everything oh god why is everything on fire'. You may wish to allow users to make some of the former mistakes, but none of the latter. You will need to be more specific for each use case you're thinking about. – Midas Feb 27 '17 at 18:17
  • @Midas (Just a thought: OP mentioned their imperfect English skills in the first sentence--not sure if this comment will be well understood. Though it is a very good point, I had to read it twice to catch what you meant... as a native English speaker.) – maxathousand Feb 27 '17 at 19:08
  • Your example doesn't make much sense and/or needs more context. – whatsisname Feb 28 '17 at 2:58
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    That said, as software has gotten better and smarter, warnings about unintended results and optimal parameters, etc, may be desirable also. I think @Midas is correct here; you need to define what's acceptably and unacceptably wrong for your context. As far as my prior comment in regard to artists, artists can do very little wrong, but that may not be true of a office worker performing data entry. – TernaryTopiary Mar 10 '17 at 10:15
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    @TernaryTopiary, thanks, very useful! Following is the copy of my other message: In our case it is probably better not to let user go alternate/error flows. But from the point of view of management of our organisation, it turns out that such decision is difficult to agree upon. So, the advice of introducing warnings is very useful as a minimal measure to escape unwanted consequences. – Andrey K. Apr 26 '17 at 13:33
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What you are talking about is called error flows or alternate flows in use case modeling. As you are mapping out the use case diagrams, you have the main flow (happy path) that gets you to your "success" post-condition. Alternate flows map the sequence of actions a user can perform that may result in an error condition or an alternate post-condition.

The short answer to your question is that it's possible to put up guardrails that prevent the user from making unexpected errors, by modeling solid use case flows that account for all possible interaction scenarios. Those guardrails might take the form of confirmation dialogs, button states, or any number of UI tricks to keep the user safe.

But as with any professional application, along with great power comes great responsibility. The key is to not let the user unexpectedly make serious errors. If they want to delete their entire project, then that's a valid use case that a user would probably want to perform at some point. But if it's easy for them to accidentally delete their projects, then that's not quality software.

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  • Thanks! In our case it is probably better not to let user go alternate/error flows. But from the point of view of management of our organisation, it turns out that such decision is difficult to agree upon. So, the advice of introducing warnings is very useful as a minimal measure to escape unwanted consequences. – Andrey K. Apr 26 '17 at 13:30

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