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I want to know a user friendly company email such as:

  • support@example.com | Doesn't address sales/business enquiries
  • business@example.com | Too specific
  • billing@example.com | Too specific
  • hello@example.com | Human-like and friendly (probably not usable for things like email confirmation emails & notifications)
  • myname@example.com | Too many emails to my personal email.

Is it possible to combine all the above in a single email or would I have to use multiple emails? (obviously my own personal company email but besides that)

Notes:

  • I need to send user registration confirmation emails, notifications, support emails, sales emails, business partnership emails, marketing emails + more

What emails would you suggest and which ones for what?

  • Another one to consider might be the one I see more than any other these days: info@example.com, which covers a lot of the general use cases. – calum_b Feb 19 '17 at 17:00
3

Use a mail for each specific task.

While you may group some tasks, it's a good idea to provide the user with a hint of what is the mail about, and it will also help you to make a distinction between friendly email accounts and important or business like notifications.

Basically, the rules of categorization and hierarchies are applied to both your visible online presence (website, app) as well as the processes derived from such presence.

By doing such discrimination, you help the user take appropriate measures. For example: I block some accounts from some sites, but not other accounts that may contain important information. Otherwise, I'd block everything (important and not important) or simply get annoyed and stop using the service. Or even worse: continue using it but ignoring all mails, including those that I actually need, which may cause issues for me as a final user, and will cause more issues for you as site owner.

In short: give control to the user and keep control for yourself. Is a win-win situation

  • 1
    Good answer and good point on the possibility of users blocking some of the accounts. – Alvaro Feb 19 '17 at 17:12
  • 1
    gracias @Alvaro :) – Devin Feb 19 '17 at 20:02
0

There are 2 more possibilities. All system generated emails coming from a generic address Eg

Noreply@company.com

And make it clear to the user that this is not to correct email to get a response from.

Then in the body of the email have the relevant reply email or a link to a contact page which then allows the user to pick the most appropriate email address to contact.

Alternatively, you could use

Contact@company.com

Which could be a catch all for a human to forward to the relevant department.

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