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I'm conducting a survey for an enterprise product used in IT security. There are two main goals:

  1. Find out whether users have any major obstacles when using the product.
  2. Find out what are the most common tasks, across the board.

I designed a survey and would like to check if you see any obvious (or not so obvious) problems with how the questions are framed.

The survey:

  • How many long have you been using [the product]?
  • How would you rate your overall familiarity with [the product]?
  • What is, in your opinion, the core purpose of [the product] in your environment/organisation?
  • What are the most common tasks you do when using [the product]?
  • Where does [the product] meet your expectations?
  • Where does it fall short?
  • What are your worst paint points when using [the product]?
  • Which of the below do you do most often? (select multiple if applicable)*

regarding the last question: there will be a short list of common tasks I've aggregated via interviews so far

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"How many long have you been using [the product]?" - what do you expect this question to reveal?

"How would you rate your overall familiarity with [the product]?" - what do you expect this question to reveal?

"What is, in your opinion, the core purpose of [the product] in your environment/organisation?" - what do you expect this question to reveal?

"What are the most common tasks you do when using [the product]?" - sounds ok, I'd put this as first question, so as to base all my subsequent questions on the most common tasks

"Where does [the product] meet your expectations?" - this questions doesn't make much sense to me. Good UI/UX is about removing obstacles above all. When UI/UX is good, it rarely brings some strong emotion in the user, it just feels ok and natural and simply doesn't notice anything special, and does not have much to say. Lack of any special comments about an interface is usually the testimony for excellent work.

"Where does it fall short?" - doesn't this coincide with "What are your worst paint points when using [the product]?"?

"Which of the below do you do most often? (select multiple if applicable)" - doesn't this coincide with "What are the most common tasks you do when using [the product]?"?


In short: I'd leave only the "What are your worst paint points when using [the product]?"? question, plus "What are the most common tasks you do when using [the product]?" Then I'd ask the respondent to carry out a few of the common tasks with this product in front of my eyes.

  • Regarding the first two questions: I can't have an expectation as the only measure of access to these users I'll ever get is an impersonal survey like this. I'm using these two questions to weed out who's who so to speak. Good comments on the other questions. – codeWolf Jan 26 '17 at 13:02
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Instead of asking "Which of the below do you do most often? (select multiple if applicable)*" and "What are the most common tasks you do when using [the product]?", I would ask "How often do you perform xx task?" and list out each task the product does.

I'd also ask about the user's role at work.

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I believe that the Support side of a product should also be considered when the issue is UX. If your costumer requested Support assistance, that could be a positive experience or a major obstacle when using the product.

With this, I would add a point like: Have you ever requested support from our Support Team? If yes, how would you rate it?

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