2 Clarified answer to nr 2.
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1. Leading the user

Instead of a knob you could use a remote control, that would let the user know that they should control the TV and try clicking on the buttons.

If you really want the knobs then you can just let them "shine" once in a while. This is very common in video games.

Here's a video from Enslaved: Watch the small "bricks" on the wall shine up in this video, they almost blink.

2. Turning the knob

Either let it "turn up one step" per click, so you can just click away and it'll wrap around from last to first setting. Or make it click-draggable (left to right) but this might be harder to communicate without a hover-tip, some arrows or something. I'd go with clicks.

1. Leading the user

Instead of a knob you could use a remote control, that would let the user know that they should control the TV and try clicking on the buttons.

If you really want the knobs then you can just let them "shine" once in a while. This is very common in video games.

Here's a video from Enslaved: Watch the small "bricks" on the wall shine up in this video, they almost blink.

2. Turning the knob

Either let it "turn up one step" per click, so you can just click away and it'll wrap around from last to first setting. Or make it click-draggable (left to right) but this might be harder to communicate without a hover-tip, some arrows or something.

1. Leading the user

Instead of a knob you could use a remote control, that would let the user know that they should control the TV and try clicking on the buttons.

If you really want the knobs then you can just let them "shine" once in a while. This is very common in video games.

Here's a video from Enslaved: Watch the small "bricks" on the wall shine up in this video, they almost blink.

2. Turning the knob

Either let it "turn up one step" per click, so you can just click away and it'll wrap around from last to first setting. Or make it click-draggable (left to right) but this might be harder to communicate without a hover-tip, some arrows or something. I'd go with clicks.

1
source | link

1. Leading the user

Instead of a knob you could use a remote control, that would let the user know that they should control the TV and try clicking on the buttons.

If you really want the knobs then you can just let them "shine" once in a while. This is very common in video games.

Here's a video from Enslaved: Watch the small "bricks" on the wall shine up in this video, they almost blink.

2. Turning the knob

Either let it "turn up one step" per click, so you can just click away and it'll wrap around from last to first setting. Or make it click-draggable (left to right) but this might be harder to communicate without a hover-tip, some arrows or something.