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2 Cleaned up and clarification
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It’s complicatedTrust is relative

Building a relationship with users is relative to the needs of the project. Setting up a bank account is likely to require more trust than buying toothpaste at Walmart. Many people who shop at Walmart are practically self-loathing customers, but they keep coming back for the perceived savings or convenience because "it's not that big of a deal".

Pressure as a shortcut

It's also possible to jump stages of the process by creating real or perceived pressure. For instance ...

  • By staging the collection of data later in the checkout funnel, some customers will complete the process despite distrust simply because they've already invested more time than they are willing to abandon.
  • More distressingly, mortgage applicants may be highly suspicious of lenders but will still provide considerable amounts of sensitive information with the hope of being qualified.

Outside factors

It's also important to remember that very different factors may contribute to the development of that relationship depending on your product and market. ThereTrust may be impacted by socio-political trends, economic conditions, or historical beliefs that either support or detract from trustwithout (or in spite of) any efforts by the organization to impact those beliefs.

Case in point, I once worked with a company who spent years eroding their quality and customer experience. I spoke doom and gloom about the eventual impact of their abuse of customers, but gained little traction. Only much later did I fully appreciate the considerable historical good will artificially inflating their profit margins.

You can’t control everything

The fact remains that a "brand" (which may also be a category of products or services) exists in the user's mind. The hopeful experience designer's ability to impact that reality varies greatly from one project to the next.

It’s complicated

Building a relationship with users is relative to the needs of the project. Setting up a bank account is likely to require more trust than buying toothpaste at Walmart. Many people who shop at Walmart are practically self-loathing customers, but they keep coming back for the perceived savings or convenience because "it's not that big of a deal".

It's also possible to jump stages of the process by creating real or perceived pressure. For instance ...

  • By staging the collection of data later in the checkout funnel, some customers will complete the process despite distrust simply because they've already invested more time than they are willing to abandon.
  • More distressingly, mortgage applicants may be highly suspicious of lenders but will still provide considerable amounts of sensitive information with the hope of being qualified.

It's also important to remember that very different factors may contribute to the development of that relationship depending on your product and market. There may be historical beliefs that either support or detract from trust in spite of any efforts by the organization to impact those beliefs.

You can’t control everything

The fact remains that a "brand" (which may also be a category of products or services) exists in the user's mind. The hopeful experience designer's ability to impact that reality varies greatly from one project to the next.

Trust is relative

Building a relationship with users is relative to the needs of the project. Setting up a bank account is likely to require more trust than buying toothpaste at Walmart. Many people who shop at Walmart are practically self-loathing customers, but they keep coming back for the perceived savings or convenience because "it's not that big of a deal".

Pressure as a shortcut

It's also possible to jump stages of the process by creating real or perceived pressure. For instance ...

  • By staging the collection of data later in the checkout funnel, some customers will complete the process despite distrust simply because they've already invested more time than they are willing to abandon.
  • More distressingly, mortgage applicants may be highly suspicious of lenders but will still provide considerable amounts of sensitive information with the hope of being qualified.

Outside factors

It's also important to remember that very different factors may contribute to the development of that relationship depending on your product and market. Trust may be impacted by socio-political trends, economic conditions, or historical beliefs without (or in spite of) any efforts by the organization.

Case in point, I once worked with a company who spent years eroding their quality and customer experience. I spoke doom and gloom about the eventual impact of their abuse of customers, but gained little traction. Only much later did I fully appreciate the considerable historical good will artificially inflating their profit margins.

You can’t control everything

The fact remains that a "brand" (which may also be a category of products or services) exists in the user's mind. The hopeful experience designer's ability to impact that reality varies greatly from one project to the next.

1
source | link

It’s complicated

Building a relationship with users is relative to the needs of the project. Setting up a bank account is likely to require more trust than buying toothpaste at Walmart. Many people who shop at Walmart are practically self-loathing customers, but they keep coming back for the perceived savings or convenience because "it's not that big of a deal".

It's also possible to jump stages of the process by creating real or perceived pressure. For instance ...

  • By staging the collection of data later in the checkout funnel, some customers will complete the process despite distrust simply because they've already invested more time than they are willing to abandon.
  • More distressingly, mortgage applicants may be highly suspicious of lenders but will still provide considerable amounts of sensitive information with the hope of being qualified.

It's also important to remember that very different factors may contribute to the development of that relationship depending on your product and market. There may be historical beliefs that either support or detract from trust in spite of any efforts by the organization to impact those beliefs.

You can’t control everything

The fact remains that a "brand" (which may also be a category of products or services) exists in the user's mind. The hopeful experience designer's ability to impact that reality varies greatly from one project to the next.