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Well, for starters, if this is an internship, this question really should be directed to your mentors and coworkers. The point of the internship is to learn from them.

That said, a wireframe is a sketch to communicate the idea/concept. The term comes from 3D modeling where the wireframe is the basic primitives of the object to give a sense of form and scale without committing to a fully rendered model. (Which, prior to computers, had to be done manually with physical models, which often started as a 'frame of wire' that clay or other such substrate was applied to to flesh out the form).

In the context of web sites, wireframes serve various purposedpurposes depending on the context of the project. These can include:

  • site flow (typically done with flow charts)
  • interactions (not always easy to document in a wireframe, but its common)
  • general content structure
  • general page layout

I would NOT use Photoshop for wireframes at all. It will tempt you to add visual design and that is not something you want in your wireframes. Stick with Balsamiq or, even better (IMHO, of course)--stick with pen and paper.

As for a great web site that sells cars, I'm not sure I have seen one yet. ;)

But note that while looking at other car sites is important, your wireframe really needs to be built around your client's project's business objectives. Ideally, you'd already have some personas and project requirements to work off of.

P.S. this question probably should be moved to UX

Well, for starters, if this is an internship, this question really should be directed to your mentors and coworkers. The point of the internship is to learn from them.

That said, a wireframe is a sketch to communicate the idea/concept. The term comes from 3D modeling where the wireframe is the basic primitives of the object to give a sense of form and scale without committing to a fully rendered model.

In the context of web sites, wireframes serve various purposed depending on the context of the project. These can include:

  • site flow (typically done with flow charts)
  • interactions (not always easy to document in a wireframe, but its common)
  • general content structure
  • general page layout

I would NOT use Photoshop for wireframes at all. It will tempt you to add visual design and that is not something you want in your wireframes. Stick with Balsamiq or, even better (IMHO, of course)--stick with pen and paper.

As for a great web site that sells cars, I'm not sure I have seen one yet. ;)

But note that while looking at other car sites is important, your wireframe really needs to be built around your client's project's business objectives. Ideally, you'd already have some personas and project requirements to work off of.

P.S. this question probably should be moved to UX

Well, for starters, if this is an internship, this question really should be directed to your mentors and coworkers. The point of the internship is to learn from them.

That said, a wireframe is a sketch to communicate the idea/concept. The term comes from 3D modeling where the wireframe is the basic primitives of the object to give a sense of form and scale without committing to a fully rendered model. (Which, prior to computers, had to be done manually with physical models, which often started as a 'frame of wire' that clay or other such substrate was applied to to flesh out the form).

In the context of web sites, wireframes serve various purposes depending on the context of the project. These can include:

  • site flow (typically done with flow charts)
  • interactions (not always easy to document in a wireframe, but its common)
  • general content structure
  • general page layout

I would NOT use Photoshop for wireframes at all. It will tempt you to add visual design and that is not something you want in your wireframes. Stick with Balsamiq or, even better (IMHO, of course)--stick with pen and paper.

As for a great web site that sells cars, I'm not sure I have seen one yet. ;)

But note that while looking at other car sites is important, your wireframe really needs to be built around your client's project's business objectives. Ideally, you'd already have some personas and project requirements to work off of.

P.S. this question probably should be moved to UX

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Well, for starters, if this is an internship, this question really should be directed to your mentors and coworkers. The point of the internship is to learn from them.

That said, a wireframe is a sketch to communicate the idea/concept. The term comes from 3D modeling where the wireframe is the basic primitives of the object to give a sense of form and scale without committing to a fully rendered model.

In the context of web sites, wireframes serve various purposed depending on the context of the project. These can include:

  • site flow (typically done with flow charts)
  • interactions (not always easy to document in a wireframe, but its common)
  • general content structure
  • general page layout

I would NOT use Photoshop for wireframes at all. It will tempt you to add visual design and that is not something you want in your wireframes. Stick with Balsamiq or, even better (IMHO, of course)--stick with pen and paper.

As for a great web site that sells cars, I'm not sure I have seen one yet. ;)

But note that while looking at other car sites is important, your wireframe really needs to be built around your client's project's business objectives. Ideally, you'd already have some personas and project requirements to work off of.

P.S. this question probably should be moved to UX