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Your breakpoints should be defined by your content and your content only.

Take each element case by case and decide based on ease of content consumption at what point it should break into some other layout configuration.

It's a mistake to silo everything on a site into predetermined screen widths as you'll end up individual elements which are little bit stretched or a little bit squashed and therefore harder to read or click. Elements that would actually have benefitted from another 100 pixels either way before breaking. To do this successfully you must focus on the content of those elements rather than on a set breakpoints.

It's also a wise move to break away from the idea of tablet, mobile and desktop because in reality things are more fluid. Thinking about content ahead of devices and their technical specs is how to win with this one. A good example of this is laptops, many of which have touch screen interfaces and are technically mobile, i.e. used over wireless or on transport etc, but from whose screensize you cannot deduce this information, hence tying screen sizes to device types can be very misleading and impact on the user experience.

Your breakpoints should be defined by your content and your content only.

Take each element case by case and decide based on ease of content consumption at what point it should break into some other layout configuration.

It's a mistake to silo everything on a site into predetermined screen widths as you'll end up individual elements which are little bit stretched or a little bit squashed and therefore harder to read or click. Elements that would actually have benefitted from another 100 pixels either way before breaking. To do this successfully you must focus on the content of those elements rather than on a set breakpoints.

It's also a wise move to break away from the idea of tablet, mobile and desktop because in reality things are more fluid. Thinking about content ahead of devices and their technical specs is how to win with this one.

Your breakpoints should be defined by your content and your content only.

Take each element case by case and decide based on ease of content consumption at what point it should break into some other layout configuration.

It's a mistake to silo everything on a site into predetermined screen widths as you'll end up individual elements which are little bit stretched or a little bit squashed and therefore harder to read or click. Elements that would actually have benefitted from another 100 pixels either way before breaking. To do this successfully you must focus on the content of those elements rather than on a set breakpoints.

It's also a wise move to break away from the idea of tablet, mobile and desktop because in reality things are more fluid. Thinking about content ahead of devices and their technical specs is how to win with this one. A good example of this is laptops, many of which have touch screen interfaces and are technically mobile, i.e. used over wireless or on transport etc, but from whose screensize you cannot deduce this information, hence tying screen sizes to device types can be very misleading and impact on the user experience.

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source | link

Your breakpoints should be defined by your content and your content only.

Take each element case by case and decide based on ease of content consumption at what point it should break into some other layout configuration.

It's a mistake to silo everything on a site into predetermined screen widths as you'll end up individual elements which are little bit stretched or a little bit squashed and therefore harder to read or click. Elements that would actually have benefitted from another 100 pixels either way before breaking. To do this successfully you must focus on the content of those elements rather than on a set breakpoints.

It's also a wise move to break away from the idea of tablet, mobile and desktop because in reality things are more fluid. Thinking about content ahead of devices and their technical specs is how to win with this one.