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Hrm... theyThey buttons are so close that people could easily click the opposite of what they want. I think it would be beneficial to consider a different paradigm of marking a "pass"?

As to your question, apparently 70-95% of people in the world are right handed (source), which makes me think it would be better to have the preferred action near the right side edge of the screen. There is less room for accidentally pressing the fail action because extra skin would just hit the edge of the device and not inadvertently hit the wrong button.

This article by Luke Wroblewski might also be useful for you to look at how people tend to use navigate on mobile devices with only one thumb.

Hrm... they are so close that people could easily click the opposite of what they want. I think it would be beneficial to consider a different paradigm of marking a "pass"?

As to your question, apparently 70-95% of people in the world are right handed (source), which makes me think it would be better to have the preferred action near the right side edge of the screen. There is less room for accidentally pressing the fail action because extra skin would just hit the edge of the device and not inadvertently hit the wrong button.

This article by Luke Wroblewski might also be useful for you to look at how people tend to use navigate on mobile devices with only one thumb.

They buttons are so close that people could easily click the opposite of what they want. I think it would be beneficial to consider a different paradigm of marking a "pass"?

As to your question, apparently 70-95% of people in the world are right handed (source), which makes me think it would be better to have the preferred action near the right side edge of the screen. There is less room for accidentally pressing the fail action because extra skin would just hit the edge of the device and not inadvertently hit the wrong button.

This article by Luke Wroblewski might also be useful to look at how people tend to use navigate on mobile devices with only one thumb.

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source | link

Hrm... they are so close that people could easily click the opposite of what they want. I think it would be beneficial to consider a different paradigm of marking a "pass"?

As to your question, apparently 70-95% of people in the world are right handed (source), which makes me think it would be better to have the preferred action near the right side edge of the screen. There is less room for accidentally pressing the fail action because extra skin would just hit the edge of the device and not inadvertently hit the wrong button.

This article by Luke Wroblewski might also be useful for you to look at how people tend to use navigate on mobile devices with only one thumb.