3 replaced http://ux.stackexchange.com/ with https://ux.stackexchange.com/
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In my experience the most result sets are only from one or a few sources. Thus there is no need to have scrollbars or collapsible containers; just display all results and cap the maximum per source.

multiple sources to the side

(I have recently been working on such a search results page, we had 3 source categories and one banner for special keywords. You can see it in full action here and here a bit more empty including the banner.)

This puts the meta-information (from which source a result is) out of the main view. The result itself is more important then to know from which category it comes. And it also makes it possible to scan which categories returned results by looking at the side.

Some tips I just copied from our solution back then, because I think they are good for your situation as well:

  • putting the categories to the side as explained above
  • usually show maximum three results from each category, put the others behind a link (that shows everything from that source, paginated as with Google)
  • hide categories with no results

And some things I also would do (which we didn't do then):

  • show more (than three) results from a source if other sources have less or zero

Phil saidPhil said to open the "more results" in a new page. I would usually open links in the same window, as often people know to find the back button. But in your case, test it! I think in such a high speed place as a call center where they've already accustomed to certain behavior it is important to follow what they as used to.

PS: I think your thought of having everything in one page is good, way better then having to search in different page, not only for fast places. Also, whenever your technology changes to make it possible to rank between the sources: think, design and test again. It might be good to have results grouped by category. However, it might be good to test with ordering categories.

In my experience the most result sets are only from one or a few sources. Thus there is no need to have scrollbars or collapsible containers; just display all results and cap the maximum per source.

multiple sources to the side

(I have recently been working on such a search results page, we had 3 source categories and one banner for special keywords. You can see it in full action here and here a bit more empty including the banner.)

This puts the meta-information (from which source a result is) out of the main view. The result itself is more important then to know from which category it comes. And it also makes it possible to scan which categories returned results by looking at the side.

Some tips I just copied from our solution back then, because I think they are good for your situation as well:

  • putting the categories to the side as explained above
  • usually show maximum three results from each category, put the others behind a link (that shows everything from that source, paginated as with Google)
  • hide categories with no results

And some things I also would do (which we didn't do then):

  • show more (than three) results from a source if other sources have less or zero

Phil said to open the "more results" in a new page. I would usually open links in the same window, as often people know to find the back button. But in your case, test it! I think in such a high speed place as a call center where they've already accustomed to certain behavior it is important to follow what they as used to.

PS: I think your thought of having everything in one page is good, way better then having to search in different page, not only for fast places. Also, whenever your technology changes to make it possible to rank between the sources: think, design and test again. It might be good to have results grouped by category. However, it might be good to test with ordering categories.

In my experience the most result sets are only from one or a few sources. Thus there is no need to have scrollbars or collapsible containers; just display all results and cap the maximum per source.

multiple sources to the side

(I have recently been working on such a search results page, we had 3 source categories and one banner for special keywords. You can see it in full action here and here a bit more empty including the banner.)

This puts the meta-information (from which source a result is) out of the main view. The result itself is more important then to know from which category it comes. And it also makes it possible to scan which categories returned results by looking at the side.

Some tips I just copied from our solution back then, because I think they are good for your situation as well:

  • putting the categories to the side as explained above
  • usually show maximum three results from each category, put the others behind a link (that shows everything from that source, paginated as with Google)
  • hide categories with no results

And some things I also would do (which we didn't do then):

  • show more (than three) results from a source if other sources have less or zero

Phil said to open the "more results" in a new page. I would usually open links in the same window, as often people know to find the back button. But in your case, test it! I think in such a high speed place as a call center where they've already accustomed to certain behavior it is important to follow what they as used to.

PS: I think your thought of having everything in one page is good, way better then having to search in different page, not only for fast places. Also, whenever your technology changes to make it possible to rank between the sources: think, design and test again. It might be good to have results grouped by category. However, it might be good to test with ordering categories.

2 added feedback on question's mockups, fixed wrong quote from Phil
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IIn my experience the most result sets are only from one or a few sources. Thus there is no need to have scrollbars or collapsible containers; just display all results and cap the maximum per source.

multiple sources to the side

(I have recently been working on such a search results page, we had 3 source categories and one banner for special keywords.

multiple sources to the side

(You You can see it in full action here and here a bit more empty including the banner.)

This puts the meta-information, from (from which source a result is,) out of the main view. The result itself is more important then to know from which category it comes. And it also makes it possible to scan which categories returned results by looking at the side.

Some thingstips I just copycopied from our solution back then, because I think they are good for your situation as well:

  • putting the categories to the leftside as explained above
  • usually show maximum three results from each category, put the others behind a linkothers behind a link (that shows everything from that source, paginated as with Google)
  • hide categories with no results

And some things I also would do (which we didn't do then):

  • show more (than three) results from a source if other sources have less or zero

Phil said to open the "more results" in a new page.Phil said to open the "more results" in a new page. I would usually open links in the notsame do that (people mostlywindow, as often people know to find the back button). But in your case, test it! I think in such a high speed place as a call center where they've already accustomed to certain behavior it is important to follow what they as used to.

PS: I think your thought of having everything in one page is good, way better then having to search in different page, not only for fast places. Also, whenever your technology changes to make it possible to rank between the sources: think, design and test again. It might be good to have results grouped by category. However, it might be good to test with ordering categories.

I have recently been working on such a search results page, we had 3 source categories and one banner for special keywords.

multiple sources to the side

(You can see it in full action here and here a bit more empty including the banner.)

This puts the meta-information, from which source a result is, out of the main view. The result is more important then to know from which category it comes. And it also makes it possible to scan which categories returned results by looking at the side.

Some things I just copy from our solution back then, because I think they are good for your situation as well:

  • putting the categories to the left as explained above
  • usually show maximum three results from each category, put the others behind a link (that shows everything from that source, paginated as with Google)
  • hide categories with no results

And some things I also would do (which we didn't do then):

  • show more results from a source if other sources have less or zero

Phil said to open the "more results" in a new page. I would usually not do that (people mostly know to find the back button). But in your case, test it! I think in such a high speed place as a call center where they've already accustomed to certain behavior it is important to follow what they as used to.

In my experience the most result sets are only from one or a few sources. Thus there is no need to have scrollbars or collapsible containers; just display all results and cap the maximum per source.

multiple sources to the side

(I have recently been working on such a search results page, we had 3 source categories and one banner for special keywords. You can see it in full action here and here a bit more empty including the banner.)

This puts the meta-information (from which source a result is) out of the main view. The result itself is more important then to know from which category it comes. And it also makes it possible to scan which categories returned results by looking at the side.

Some tips I just copied from our solution back then, because I think they are good for your situation as well:

  • putting the categories to the side as explained above
  • usually show maximum three results from each category, put the others behind a link (that shows everything from that source, paginated as with Google)
  • hide categories with no results

And some things I also would do (which we didn't do then):

  • show more (than three) results from a source if other sources have less or zero

Phil said to open the "more results" in a new page. I would usually open links in the same window, as often people know to find the back button. But in your case, test it! I think in such a high speed place as a call center where they've already accustomed to certain behavior it is important to follow what they as used to.

PS: I think your thought of having everything in one page is good, way better then having to search in different page, not only for fast places. Also, whenever your technology changes to make it possible to rank between the sources: think, design and test again. It might be good to have results grouped by category. However, it might be good to test with ordering categories.

1
source | link

I have recently been working on such a search results page, we had 3 source categories and one banner for special keywords.

multiple sources to the side

(You can see it in full action here and here a bit more empty including the banner.)

This puts the meta-information, from which source a result is, out of the main view. The result is more important then to know from which category it comes. And it also makes it possible to scan which categories returned results by looking at the side.

Some things I just copy from our solution back then, because I think they are good for your situation as well:

  • putting the categories to the left as explained above
  • usually show maximum three results from each category, put the others behind a link (that shows everything from that source, paginated as with Google)
  • hide categories with no results

And some things I also would do (which we didn't do then):

  • show more results from a source if other sources have less or zero

Phil said to open the "more results" in a new page. I would usually not do that (people mostly know to find the back button). But in your case, test it! I think in such a high speed place as a call center where they've already accustomed to certain behavior it is important to follow what they as used to.