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Our company has an Android application online, able to be downloaded. We have a lot of daily downloads and reviews, and we currently have a pretty heavily maintained rate of 4.37/5

On the other hand, he have 33 apps that hold variations of the "main app", which are targeted to different audiences. My boss wants to release them only after we do the "official release", which will be when the app raises up to 4.65/5. That's a pretty long journey, especially when there seems to be clients that want to poorly review, despite giving any hint on what did go wrong. Some comments one can read (some of them were in other languages, so there may be rephrased sentences), with their rates in parens:

  • The good client: "There was a bug since last version and I cannot get in. Please solve it" (1/5)
  • The contradictory: "Very good" (1/5)
  • The overreacting hater: "DAMMIT I DON'T REALLY LIKE YOUR APP, BUT HEY, I'M A REALLY NICE AND FUNNY GIRL. IT'S JUST IT IS THE WORST I'VE EVER SEEN IN MY LIFE!" (1/5)* *   I promise I only stripped out the name (she was even introducing herself, for some reason), but the "nice and funny girl" part is directly taken from the comment
  • The kidnapper: "Everything's nice, but I'd like to see feature too specific for us to actually deploy it. Only then I'll give you 5 stars" (3/5)

The first comment is, in fact, the best, since it states he gives us 1 star for an error that appeared in the last version. Replies to these clients may not raise us their rating directly (less often than what's desirable), but they push the app to a better finished state.

The second one is one of the not-so-uncommon people that thinks 1 star is better than 5. Trying to ask them to raise the review ends in nothing, since they seem to find 1 star as a better prize than 5 stars.

The other two comments, as you see, are quite useless, as they don't give us a good review, but they don't give us any hint on how to proceed with this either, or the process is simply impossible to meet. We've tried to get sometimes kidnapped stars from these kind of people, and they tend to ask for more features that don't give a global better value for the app.

I've faced these two kind of clients before, and they don't tend to improve ratings afterwards. Sometimes, I've even seen how the rating decreased, since they re-rated it lower than before. Even telling them that the issues were only with version X.Y.Z, and if they downloaded the last version, any error would disappear, or that W feature was implemented in a newer version he could download.

How can one talk to poor reviewers, trying to ask for more explanations or better reviews?

Our company has an Android application online, able to be downloaded. We have a lot of daily downloads and reviews, and we currently have a pretty heavily maintained rate of 4.37/5

On the other hand, he have 33 apps that hold variations of the "main app", which are targeted to different audiences. My boss wants to release them only after we do the "official release", which will be when the app raises up to 4.65/5. That's a pretty long journey, especially when there seems to be clients that want to poorly review, despite giving any hint on what did go wrong. Some comments one can read (some of them were in other languages, so there may be rephrased sentences), with their rates in parens:

  • The good client: "There was a bug since last version and I cannot get in. Please solve it" (1/5)
  • The contradictory: "Very good" (1/5)
  • The overreacting hater: "DAMMIT I DON'T REALLY LIKE YOUR APP, BUT HEY, I'M A REALLY NICE AND FUNNY GIRL. IT'S JUST IT IS THE WORST I'VE EVER SEEN IN MY LIFE!" (1/5)* * I promise I only stripped out the name (she was even introducing herself, for some reason), but the "nice and funny girl" part is directly taken from the comment
  • The kidnapper: "Everything's nice, but I'd like to see feature too specific for us to actually deploy it. Only then I'll give you 5 stars" (3/5)

The first comment is, in fact, the best, since it states he gives us 1 star for an error that appeared in the last version. Replies to these clients may not raise us their rating directly (less often than what's desirable), but they push the app to a better finished state.

The second one is one of the not-so-uncommon people that thinks 1 star is better than 5. Trying to ask them to raise the review ends in nothing, since they seem to find 1 star as a better prize than 5 stars.

The other two comments, as you see, are quite useless, as they don't give us a good review, but they don't give us any hint on how to proceed with this either, or the process is simply impossible to meet. We've tried to get sometimes kidnapped stars from these kind of people, and they tend to ask for more features that don't give a global better value for the app.

I've faced these two kind of clients before, and they don't tend to improve ratings afterwards. Sometimes, I've even seen how the rating decreased, since they re-rated it lower than before. Even telling them that the issues were only with version X.Y.Z, and if they downloaded the last version, any error would disappear, or that W feature was implemented in a newer version he could download.

How can one talk to poor reviewers, trying to ask for more explanations or better reviews?

Our company has an Android application online, able to be downloaded. We have a lot of daily downloads and reviews, and we currently have a pretty heavily maintained rate of 4.37/5

On the other hand, he have 33 apps that hold variations of the "main app", which are targeted to different audiences. My boss wants to release them only after we do the "official release", which will be when the app raises up to 4.65/5. That's a pretty long journey, especially when there seems to be clients that want to poorly review, despite giving any hint on what did go wrong. Some comments one can read (some of them were in other languages, so there may be rephrased sentences), with their rates in parens:

  • The good client: "There was a bug since last version and I cannot get in. Please solve it" (1/5)
  • The contradictory: "Very good" (1/5)
  • The overreacting hater: "DAMMIT I DON'T REALLY LIKE YOUR APP, BUT HEY, I'M A REALLY NICE AND FUNNY GIRL. IT'S JUST IT IS THE WORST I'VE EVER SEEN IN MY LIFE!" (1/5)  I promise I only stripped out the name (she was even introducing herself, for some reason), but the "nice and funny girl" part is directly taken from the comment
  • The kidnapper: "Everything's nice, but I'd like to see feature too specific for us to actually deploy it. Only then I'll give you 5 stars" (3/5)

The first comment is, in fact, the best, since it states he gives us 1 star for an error that appeared in the last version. Replies to these clients may not raise us their rating directly (less often than what's desirable), but they push the app to a better finished state.

The second one is one of the not-so-uncommon people that thinks 1 star is better than 5. Trying to ask them to raise the review ends in nothing, since they seem to find 1 star as a better prize than 5 stars.

The other two comments, as you see, are quite useless, as they don't give us a good review, but they don't give us any hint on how to proceed with this either, or the process is simply impossible to meet. We've tried to get sometimes kidnapped stars from these kind of people, and they tend to ask for more features that don't give a global better value for the app.

I've faced these two kind of clients before, and they don't tend to improve ratings afterwards. Sometimes, I've even seen how the rating decreased, since they re-rated it lower than before. Even telling them that the issues were only with version X.Y.Z, and if they downloaded the last version, any error would disappear, or that W feature was implemented in a newer version he could download.

How can one talk to poor reviewers, trying to ask for more explanations or better reviews?

4 wow, I actually wrote the rating wrong. Not critical, though
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Our company has an Android application online, able to be downloaded. We have a lot of daily downloads and reviews, and we currently have a pretty heavily maintained rate of 4.37/5

On the other hand, he have 33 apps that hold variations of the "main app", which are targeted to different audiences. My boss wants to release them only after we do the "official release", which will be when the app raises up to 4.65/5. That's a pretty long journey, especially when there seems to be clients that want to poorly review, despite giving any hint on what did go wrong. Some comments one can read (some of them were in other languages, so there may be rephrased sentences), with their rates in parens:

  • The good client: "There was a bug since last version and I cannot get in. Please solve it" (21/5)
  • The contradictory: "Very good" (1/5)
  • The overreacting hater: "DAMMIT I DON'T REALLY LIKE YOUR APP, BUT HEY, I'M A REALLY NICE AND FUNNY GIRL. IT'S JUST IT IS THE WORST I'VE EVER SEEN IN MY LIFE!" (1/5)* * I promise I only stripped out the name (she was even introducing herself, for some reason), but the "nice and funny girl" part is directly taken from the comment
  • The kidnapper: "Everything's nice, but I'd like to see feature too specific for us to actually deploy it. Only then I'll give you 5 stars" (3/5)

The first comment is, in fact, the best, since it states he gives us 1 star for an error that appeared in the last version. Replies to these clients may not raise us their rating directly (less often than what's desirable), but they push the app to a better finished state.

The second one is one of the not-so-uncommon people that thinks 1 star is better than 5. Trying to ask them to raise the review ends in nothing, since they seem to find 1 star as a better prize than 5 stars.

The other two comments, as you see, are quite useless, as they don't give us a good review, but they don't give us any hint on how to proceed with this either, or the process is simply impossible to meet. We've tried to get sometimes kidnapped stars from these kind of people, and they tend to ask for more features that don't give a global better value for the app.

I've faced these two kind of clients before, and they don't tend to improve ratings afterwards. Sometimes, I've even seen how the rating decreased, since they re-rated it lower than before. Even telling them that the issues were only with version X.Y.Z, and if they downloaded the last version, any error would disappear, or that W feature was implemented in a newer version he could download.

How can one talk to poor reviewers, trying to ask for more explanations or better reviews?

Our company has an Android application online, able to be downloaded. We have a lot of daily downloads and reviews, and we currently have a pretty heavily maintained rate of 4.37/5

On the other hand, he have 33 apps that hold variations of the "main app", which are targeted to different audiences. My boss wants to release them only after we do the "official release", which will be when the app raises up to 4.65/5. That's a pretty long journey, especially when there seems to be clients that want to poorly review, despite giving any hint on what did go wrong. Some comments one can read (some of them were in other languages, so there may be rephrased sentences), with their rates in parens:

  • The good client: "There was a bug since last version and I cannot get in. Please solve it" (2/5)
  • The contradictory: "Very good" (1/5)
  • The overreacting hater: "DAMMIT I DON'T REALLY LIKE YOUR APP, BUT HEY, I'M A REALLY NICE AND FUNNY GIRL. IT'S JUST IT IS THE WORST I'VE EVER SEEN IN MY LIFE!" (1/5)* * I promise I only stripped out the name (she was even introducing herself, for some reason), but the "nice and funny girl" part is directly taken from the comment
  • The kidnapper: "Everything's nice, but I'd like to see feature too specific for us to actually deploy it. Only then I'll give you 5 stars" (3/5)

The first comment is, in fact, the best, since it states he gives us 1 star for an error that appeared in the last version. Replies to these clients may not raise us their rating directly (less often than what's desirable), but they push the app to a better finished state.

The second one is one of the not-so-uncommon people that thinks 1 star is better than 5. Trying to ask them to raise the review ends in nothing, since they seem to find 1 star as a better prize than 5 stars.

The other two comments, as you see, are quite useless, as they don't give us a good review, but they don't give us any hint on how to proceed with this either, or the process is simply impossible to meet. We've tried to get sometimes kidnapped stars from these kind of people, and they tend to ask for more features that don't give a global better value for the app.

I've faced these two kind of clients before, and they don't tend to improve ratings afterwards. Sometimes, I've even seen how the rating decreased, since they re-rated it lower than before. Even telling them that the issues were only with version X.Y.Z, and if they downloaded the last version, any error would disappear, or that W feature was implemented in a newer version he could download.

How can one talk to poor reviewers, trying to ask for more explanations or better reviews?

Our company has an Android application online, able to be downloaded. We have a lot of daily downloads and reviews, and we currently have a pretty heavily maintained rate of 4.37/5

On the other hand, he have 33 apps that hold variations of the "main app", which are targeted to different audiences. My boss wants to release them only after we do the "official release", which will be when the app raises up to 4.65/5. That's a pretty long journey, especially when there seems to be clients that want to poorly review, despite giving any hint on what did go wrong. Some comments one can read (some of them were in other languages, so there may be rephrased sentences), with their rates in parens:

  • The good client: "There was a bug since last version and I cannot get in. Please solve it" (1/5)
  • The contradictory: "Very good" (1/5)
  • The overreacting hater: "DAMMIT I DON'T REALLY LIKE YOUR APP, BUT HEY, I'M A REALLY NICE AND FUNNY GIRL. IT'S JUST IT IS THE WORST I'VE EVER SEEN IN MY LIFE!" (1/5)* * I promise I only stripped out the name (she was even introducing herself, for some reason), but the "nice and funny girl" part is directly taken from the comment
  • The kidnapper: "Everything's nice, but I'd like to see feature too specific for us to actually deploy it. Only then I'll give you 5 stars" (3/5)

The first comment is, in fact, the best, since it states he gives us 1 star for an error that appeared in the last version. Replies to these clients may not raise us their rating directly (less often than what's desirable), but they push the app to a better finished state.

The second one is one of the not-so-uncommon people that thinks 1 star is better than 5. Trying to ask them to raise the review ends in nothing, since they seem to find 1 star as a better prize than 5 stars.

The other two comments, as you see, are quite useless, as they don't give us a good review, but they don't give us any hint on how to proceed with this either, or the process is simply impossible to meet. We've tried to get sometimes kidnapped stars from these kind of people, and they tend to ask for more features that don't give a global better value for the app.

I've faced these two kind of clients before, and they don't tend to improve ratings afterwards. Sometimes, I've even seen how the rating decreased, since they re-rated it lower than before. Even telling them that the issues were only with version X.Y.Z, and if they downloaded the last version, any error would disappear, or that W feature was implemented in a newer version he could download.

How can one talk to poor reviewers, trying to ask for more explanations or better reviews?

    Tweeted twitter.com/#!/StackUX/status/524829842756599808
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2 a poorly reviewer means an ill reviewer. A poor reviewer means someone who does not do a good job of reviewing
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    Post Migrated Here from workplace.stackexchange.com
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