2 replaced http://ux.stackexchange.com/ with https://ux.stackexchange.com/
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The problem looks to me like it can be solved using Closed Card Sorting technique

It's a well-known, quick and inexpensive activity for guiding information architecture work.

Some quotes from the article:

The process involves sorting a series of cards, each labeled with a piece of content or functionality, into groups that make sense to users or participants.

... card sorting “can provide insight into users’ mental models, illuminating the way that they often tacitly group, sort and label tasks and content within their own heads.”

By analyzing the card sorting data, you would then have a glimpse into the users’ mental model, which in turn can increase findability, and make the navigation easier to use.

As for the three options you presented, have a look as well on this related questionthis related question on this site.

Hope it helps.

The problem looks to me like it can be solved using Closed Card Sorting technique

It's a well-known, quick and inexpensive activity for guiding information architecture work.

Some quotes from the article:

The process involves sorting a series of cards, each labeled with a piece of content or functionality, into groups that make sense to users or participants.

... card sorting “can provide insight into users’ mental models, illuminating the way that they often tacitly group, sort and label tasks and content within their own heads.”

By analyzing the card sorting data, you would then have a glimpse into the users’ mental model, which in turn can increase findability, and make the navigation easier to use.

As for the three options you presented, have a look as well on this related question on this site.

Hope it helps.

The problem looks to me like it can be solved using Closed Card Sorting technique

It's a well-known, quick and inexpensive activity for guiding information architecture work.

Some quotes from the article:

The process involves sorting a series of cards, each labeled with a piece of content or functionality, into groups that make sense to users or participants.

... card sorting “can provide insight into users’ mental models, illuminating the way that they often tacitly group, sort and label tasks and content within their own heads.”

By analyzing the card sorting data, you would then have a glimpse into the users’ mental model, which in turn can increase findability, and make the navigation easier to use.

As for the three options you presented, have a look as well on this related question on this site.

Hope it helps.

1
source | link

The problem looks to me like it can be solved using Closed Card Sorting technique

It's a well-known, quick and inexpensive activity for guiding information architecture work.

Some quotes from the article:

The process involves sorting a series of cards, each labeled with a piece of content or functionality, into groups that make sense to users or participants.

... card sorting “can provide insight into users’ mental models, illuminating the way that they often tacitly group, sort and label tasks and content within their own heads.”

By analyzing the card sorting data, you would then have a glimpse into the users’ mental model, which in turn can increase findability, and make the navigation easier to use.

As for the three options you presented, have a look as well on this related question on this site.

Hope it helps.