Post Undeleted by Max Walter
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To skip the folders and focus on making backups of different types of files (as suggested by Jørn E. Angeltveit and AR.) might reduce the number of decisions the users have to make when starting to use the program (this will make some power users frustrated). This design is based on trying to simplify as much as possible (maybe to much).

I have skipped the tabs and hided the less used preferences and functions in "Advanced backup" and "Advanced sharing".

1) Files and folders that are common to backup are backed up from the start. The users want to see that something happens instantly when starting to use the program. 2) The backup is done on different types of files suggested by the software. The types of files may be in predefined categories, for example, Documents (docx, xlsx, pptx) or Web (html, css, js), or automagically created categories based on number of files of a certain type (*.leo), files that is used often or some other pattern. When new patterns emerge the user is notified about it in a friendly manner. This makes it easy for users to make decisions about what they want to backup. 3) I could not resist to not simplify the Preference tab as well :)

  1. Files and folders that are common to backup are backed up from the start. The users want to see that something happens instantly when starting to use the program.
  2. The backup is done on different types of files suggested by the software. The types of files may be in predefined categories, for example, Documents (docx, xlsx, pptx) or Web (html, css, js), or automagically created categories based on number of files of a certain type (*.leo), files that is used often or some other pattern. When new patterns emerge the user is notified about it in a friendly manner. This makes it easy for users to make decisions about what they want to backup.
  3. I could not resist to not simplify the Preference tab as well :)

[[Image]]enter image description here

If you have to stick to usebackup folders, I would suggest several ways of adding folders outside the main window:

  1. Context menu as suggested by ????Renaud.
  2. Drag and drop folders to the Degoo icon on the Windows desktop, the taskbar and/or the notification area in the taskbar.
  3. Drag and drop to an icon that hides on the edge of the computer screen, similar to the sun menu in Techsmith's screenshot software, Jing (http://www.techsmith.com/jing.html).

[[Image]]

I personally thinkBy personal experience, the context menu and drag and drop to the Degoo window is the simplest and most intuitive way of adding folders. The third suggestion is hard to get right, and I think Jing is one of few software that have made it work pretty well. I would test all of these alternatives and include the ones that is most often used in the final product.

To skip the folders and focus on making backups of different types of files (as suggested by Jørn E. Angeltveit and AR.) might reduce the number of decisions the users have to make when starting to use the program (this will make some power users frustrated). This design is based on trying to simplify as much as possible (maybe to much).

I have skipped the tabs and hided the less used functions in "Advanced backup" and "Advanced sharing".

1) Files and folders that are common to backup are backed up from the start. The users want to see that something happens instantly when starting to use the program. 2) The backup is done on different types of files suggested by the software. The types of files may be in predefined categories, for example, Documents (docx, xlsx, pptx) or Web (html, css, js), or automagically created categories based on number of files of a certain type (*.leo), files that is used often or some other pattern. When new patterns emerge the user is notified about it in a friendly manner. This makes it easy for users to make decisions about what they want to backup. 3) I could not resist to not simplify the Preference tab as well :)

[[Image]]

If you have to stick to use folders, I would suggest several ways of adding folders outside:

  1. Context menu as suggested by ????.
  2. Drag and drop folders to the Degoo icon on the Windows desktop, the taskbar and/or the notification area in the taskbar.
  3. Drag and drop to an icon that hides on the edge of the computer screen, similar to the sun menu in Techsmith's screenshot software, Jing (http://www.techsmith.com/jing.html).

[[Image]]

I personally think the context menu and drag and drop to the Degoo window is the simplest and most intuitive way of adding folders. The third suggestion is hard to get right, and I think Jing is one of few software that have made it work pretty well. I would test all of these alternatives and include the ones that is most often used in the final product.

To skip the folders and focus on making backups of different types of files (as suggested by Jørn E. Angeltveit and AR.) might reduce the number of decisions the users have to make when starting to use the program (this will make some power users frustrated). This design is based on trying to simplify as much as possible (maybe to much).

I have skipped the tabs and hided the less used preferences and functions in "Advanced backup" and "Advanced sharing".

  1. Files and folders that are common to backup are backed up from the start. The users want to see that something happens instantly when starting to use the program.
  2. The backup is done on different types of files suggested by the software. The types of files may be in predefined categories, for example, Documents (docx, xlsx, pptx) or Web (html, css, js), or automagically created categories based on number of files of a certain type (*.leo), files that is used often or some other pattern. When new patterns emerge the user is notified about it in a friendly manner. This makes it easy for users to make decisions about what they want to backup.
  3. I could not resist to not simplify the Preference tab as well :)

enter image description here

If you have to stick to backup folders, I would suggest several ways of adding folders outside the main window:

  1. Context menu as suggested by Renaud.
  2. Drag and drop folders to the Degoo icon on the Windows desktop, the taskbar and/or the notification area in the taskbar.
  3. Drag and drop to an icon that hides on the edge of the computer screen, similar to the sun menu in Techsmith's screenshot software, Jing (http://www.techsmith.com/jing.html).

By personal experience, the context menu and drag and drop to the Degoo window is the simplest and most intuitive way of adding folders. The third suggestion is hard to get right, and I think Jing is one of few software that have made it work pretty well. I would test all of these alternatives and include the ones that is most often used in the final product.

    Post Deleted by Max Walter
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To skip the folders and focus on making backups of different types of files (as suggested by Jørn E. Angeltveit and AR.) might reduce the number of decisions the users have to make when starting to use the program (this will make some power users frustrated). This design is based on trying to simplify as much as possible (maybe to much).

I have skipped the tabs and hided the less used functions in "Advanced backup" and "Advanced sharing".

1) Files and folders that are common to backup are backed up from the start. The users want to see that something happens instantly when starting to use the program. 2) The backup is done on different types of files suggested by the software. The types of files may be in predefined categories, for example, Documents (docx, xlsx, pptx) or Web (html, css, js), or automagically created categories based on number of files of a certain type (*.leo), files that is used often or some other pattern. When new patterns emerge the user is notified about it in a friendly manner. This makes it easy for users to make decisions about what they want to backup. 3) I could not resist to not simplify the Preference tab as well :)

[[Image]]

If you have to stick to use folders, I would suggest several ways of adding folders outside:

  1. Context menu as suggested by ????.
  2. Drag and drop folders to the Degoo icon on the Windows desktop, the taskbar and/or the notification area in the taskbar.
  3. Drag and drop to an icon that hides on the edge of the computer screen, similar to the sun menu in Techsmith's screenshot software, Jing (http://www.techsmith.com/jing.html).

[[Image]]

I personally think the context menu and drag and drop to the Degoo window is the simplest and most intuitive way of adding folders. The third suggestion is hard to get right, and I think Jing is one of few software that have made it work pretty well. I would test all of these alternatives and include the ones that is most often used in the final product.