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I think sliders are bad practice in general when it comes to selecting a precise number.

A slider is a good choice when you know that users think of the value as a relative quantity, not a numeric value. For example, users think about setting their audio volume to low or medium—not about setting the value to 2 or 5. — Microsoft

Sliders are functional when it comes to something like volume, where the exact number doesn't really matter. I know I like the volume on my TV somewhere between 10 and 15, it doesn't really matter.
But when selecting a quantitiy, it becomes a different matter entirely. I once came across a concept app for grocery shopping. The user could select the quantity with a slider. You normally want to buy an exact number of certain item, not somewhere between 10 and 15 items, no, you want exactly 12 eggs.
The problem with that particular case was that a slider was easy in use with a low range of numbers. If the range was from 0 to 10, you could easily make the steps in grids so the number would be easily to select. But when selecting an amount of items, where should the max be? Some people buy their groceries in bulk, other don't.

You mentioned some people add +1 en -1 buttons to sliders. That just gives me the shivers. It's like tying a ribbon around a pig to try to make it more pretty. You shouldn't go adding stuff to something that is already broken trying to fix it. You'll just make a bulky mess.

Therefor I kind of like your idea. The alternatives to sliders are normal input field or numeric input field with the arrow up and down to increase or decrease the number. But the first can be considered cumbersome and the second doesn't work on touch devices.

My only concern is it's sensitivity. Holding something down on a touch device can be difficult. I don't know how difficult it is on a technical level to detect the touch-and-hold event. But on a practical level it could be difficult for the user to use. People aren't always sitting in a chair when using their phones. They're walking or they're in the bus. Keeping connection with your screen can be difficult when you're on a bumpy road.

A similar concept without the need of having to hold your finger down would be a slider you control by making long or short swiping gestures.
A long swipe gesture (over X amount of pixels) will move the sliders faster and further depending on the speed of the swipe. Short swipes will move the slider by +1 or -1.

I think sliders are bad practice in general when it comes to selecting a precise number.

A slider is a good choice when you know that users think of the value as a relative quantity, not a numeric value. For example, users think about setting their audio volume to low or medium—not about setting the value to 2 or 5. — Microsoft

Sliders are functional when it comes to something like volume, where the exact number doesn't really matter. I know I like the volume on my TV somewhere between 10 and 15, it doesn't really matter.
But when selecting a quantitiy, it becomes a different matter entirely. I once came across a concept app for grocery shopping. The user could select the quantity with a slider. You normally want to buy an exact number of certain item, not somewhere between 10 and 15 items, no, you want exactly 12 eggs.
The problem with that particular case was that a slider was easy in use with a low range of numbers. If the range was from 0 to 10, you could easily make the steps in grids so the number would be easily to select. But when selecting an amount of items, where should the max be? Some people buy their groceries in bulk, other don't.

You mentioned some people add +1 en -1 buttons to sliders. That just gives me the shivers. It's like tying a ribbon around a pig to try to make it more pretty. You shouldn't go adding stuff to something that is already broken trying to fix it. You'll just make a bulky mess.

Therefor I kind of like your idea. The alternatives to sliders are normal input field or numeric input field with the arrow up and down to increase or decrease the number. But the first can be considered cumbersome and the second doesn't work on touch devices.

I think sliders are bad practice in general when it comes to selecting a precise number.

A slider is a good choice when you know that users think of the value as a relative quantity, not a numeric value. For example, users think about setting their audio volume to low or medium—not about setting the value to 2 or 5. — Microsoft

Sliders are functional when it comes to something like volume, where the exact number doesn't really matter. I know I like the volume on my TV somewhere between 10 and 15, it doesn't really matter.
But when selecting a quantitiy, it becomes a different matter entirely. I once came across a concept app for grocery shopping. The user could select the quantity with a slider. You normally want to buy an exact number of certain item, not somewhere between 10 and 15 items, no, you want exactly 12 eggs.
The problem with that particular case was that a slider was easy in use with a low range of numbers. If the range was from 0 to 10, you could easily make the steps in grids so the number would be easily to select. But when selecting an amount of items, where should the max be? Some people buy their groceries in bulk, other don't.

You mentioned some people add +1 en -1 buttons to sliders. That just gives me the shivers. It's like tying a ribbon around a pig to try to make it more pretty. You shouldn't go adding stuff to something that is already broken trying to fix it. You'll just make a bulky mess.

Therefor I kind of like your idea. The alternatives to sliders are normal input field or numeric input field with the arrow up and down to increase or decrease the number. But the first can be considered cumbersome and the second doesn't work on touch devices.

My only concern is it's sensitivity. Holding something down on a touch device can be difficult. I don't know how difficult it is on a technical level to detect the touch-and-hold event. But on a practical level it could be difficult for the user to use. People aren't always sitting in a chair when using their phones. They're walking or they're in the bus. Keeping connection with your screen can be difficult when you're on a bumpy road.

A similar concept without the need of having to hold your finger down would be a slider you control by making long or short swiping gestures.
A long swipe gesture (over X amount of pixels) will move the sliders faster and further depending on the speed of the swipe. Short swipes will move the slider by +1 or -1.

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I think sliders are bad practice in general when it comes to selecting a precise number.

A slider is a good choice when you know that users think of the value as a relative quantity, not a numeric value. For example, users think about setting their audio volume to low or medium—not about setting the value to 2 or 5. — Microsoft

Sliders are functional when it comes to something like volume, where the exact number doesn't really matter. I know I like the volume on my TV somewhere between 10 and 15, it doesn't really matter.
But when selecting a quantitiy, it becomes a different matter entirely. I once came across a concept app for grocery shopping. The user could select the quantity with a slider. You normally want to buy an exact number of certain item, not somewhere between 10 and 15 items, no, you want exactly 12 eggs.
The problem with that particular case was that a slider was easy in use with a low range of numbers. If itthe range was from 0 to 10, you could easily make the steps in grids so the number would be for the amount of pounds of meat a little bit more or less wouldn't really mattereasily to select. But when buying, let's say, sixpacksselecting an amount of beeritems, youwhere should the max be? Some people buy their groceries in bulk, other don't want.

You mentioned some people add +1 en -1 buttons to sliders. That just gives me the shivers. It's like tying a ribbon around a pig to try to make it more pretty. You shouldn't go adding stuff to something that is already broken trying to fix it. You'll just make a bulky mess.

Therefor I kind of like your idea. The alternatives to sliders are normal input field or numeric input field with the arrow up and down to increase or decrease the number. But the first can be considered cumbersome and the second doesn't work on touch devices.

I think sliders are bad practice in general when it comes to selecting a precise number.

A slider is a good choice when you know that users think of the value as a relative quantity, not a numeric value. For example, users think about setting their audio volume to low or medium—not about setting the value to 2 or 5. — Microsoft

Sliders are functional when it comes to something like volume, where the exact number doesn't really matter. I know I like the volume on my TV somewhere between 10 and 15, it doesn't really matter.
But when selecting a quantitiy, it becomes a different matter entirely. I once came across a concept app for grocery shopping. The user could select the quantity with a slider. If it would be for the amount of pounds of meat a little bit more or less wouldn't really matter. But when buying, let's say, sixpacks of beer, you don't want to

I think sliders are bad practice in general when it comes to selecting a precise number.

A slider is a good choice when you know that users think of the value as a relative quantity, not a numeric value. For example, users think about setting their audio volume to low or medium—not about setting the value to 2 or 5. — Microsoft

Sliders are functional when it comes to something like volume, where the exact number doesn't really matter. I know I like the volume on my TV somewhere between 10 and 15, it doesn't really matter.
But when selecting a quantitiy, it becomes a different matter entirely. I once came across a concept app for grocery shopping. The user could select the quantity with a slider. You normally want to buy an exact number of certain item, not somewhere between 10 and 15 items, no, you want exactly 12 eggs.
The problem with that particular case was that a slider was easy in use with a low range of numbers. If the range was from 0 to 10, you could easily make the steps in grids so the number would be easily to select. But when selecting an amount of items, where should the max be? Some people buy their groceries in bulk, other don't.

You mentioned some people add +1 en -1 buttons to sliders. That just gives me the shivers. It's like tying a ribbon around a pig to try to make it more pretty. You shouldn't go adding stuff to something that is already broken trying to fix it. You'll just make a bulky mess.

Therefor I kind of like your idea. The alternatives to sliders are normal input field or numeric input field with the arrow up and down to increase or decrease the number. But the first can be considered cumbersome and the second doesn't work on touch devices.

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I think sliders are bad practice in general when it comes to selecting a precise number.

A slider is a good choice when you know that users think of the value as a relative quantity, not a numeric value. For example, users think about setting their audio volume to low or medium—not about setting the value to 2 or 5. — Microsoft

Sliders are functional when it comes to something like volume, where the exact number doesn't really matter. I know I like the volume on my TV somewhere between 10 and 15, it doesn't really matter.
But when selecting a quantitiy, it becomes a different matter entirely. I once came across a concept app for grocery shopping. The user could select the quantity with a slider. If it would be for the amount of pounds of meat a little bit more or less wouldn't really matter. But when buying, let's say, sixpacks of beer, you don't want to