A message from our CEO about the future of Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange. Read now.
4 added 264 characters in body
source | link

Sadly there is no standard for the name of such an email - all your suggestions are used. But consider the following:

  • Verification Email - used when you can still access services, but need to verify your email in the meantime.
  • Activation Email - used when services (account) are not accessible until email activation takes place. You can argue that there is some more urgency in 'activating' than in 'verifying'.
  • Confirmation Email - I prefer to think of this as something sent as a confirmation of something (purchase confirmation, password change confirmation). You can say that the email is to confirm the user's email address.

Here are a few examples to get you started (starting with my favourite):

The Noun Project

Please Verify your Noun Project account

Noun Project Email

The good:

  • Very minimalistic design.

The bad:

  • email subject and content terms don't match. Subject says 'Verify' while content says 'Activate'.
  • No need for the 'Activate Account' heading. It is redundant to the button, which is the primary action point.
  • Link contrast somewhat low.

MailChimp

Activate your MailChimp account.

MailChimp Activation Email

The good:

  • Monkey and "Just one more step..." make the system appear more fun and the sentence should motivate people to click on the button.

The bad:

  • No need for the line asking people to click on the button. PeopleMost people should get it without these instructions (and even if they won't get it - people often try the most probable possible action when inconclusive).
  • Nobody caresFew will care for the address of the company, or the copyright clause. Users at this point and user eyes will most often skip this. The address of the company does promote trust, but such soft goal is likely to have already been satisfied prior registrations.
  • No links in case the email was sent by mistake, or if people have problems when clicking the button.

Pinterest

Please confirm your email

Pinterest Confirmation Email

The good:

  • Nice design.

The bad:

  • Again, no real need for the sentence next to the button.
  • Two exclamation marks can be considered style that is not ideal. Exclamation marks should be used sparingly for a very specific desired effect.
  • The long link is ugly, and in my view unnecessary. This is even more odd as the Privacy Policy is given as a normal link.

Sadly there is no standard for the name of such an email - all your suggestions are used. But consider the following:

  • Verification Email - used when you can still access services, but need to verify your email in the meantime.
  • Activation Email - used when services (account) are not accessible until email activation takes place. You can argue that there is some more urgency in 'activating' than in 'verifying'.
  • Confirmation Email - I prefer to think of this as something sent as a confirmation of something (purchase confirmation, password change confirmation). You can say that the email is to confirm the user's email address.

Here are a few examples to get you started (starting with my favourite):

The Noun Project

Please Verify your Noun Project account

Noun Project Email

The good:

  • Very minimalistic design.

The bad:

  • email subject and content terms don't match. Subject says 'Verify' while content says 'Activate'.
  • No need for the 'Activate Account' heading. It is redundant to the button, which is the primary action point.
  • Link contrast somewhat low.

MailChimp

Activate your MailChimp account.

MailChimp Activation Email

The good:

  • Monkey and "Just one more step..." make the system appear more fun and the sentence should motivate people to click on the button.

The bad:

  • No need for the line asking people to click on the button. People should get it without these instructions.
  • Nobody cares for the address of the company, or the copyright clause. Users eyes will skip this.
  • No links in case the email was sent by mistake, or if people have problems when clicking the button.

Pinterest

Please confirm your email

Pinterest Confirmation Email

The good:

  • Nice design.

The bad:

  • Again, no real need for the sentence next to the button.
  • Two exclamation marks can be considered style that is not ideal. Exclamation marks should be used sparingly for a very specific desired effect.
  • The long link is ugly, and in my view unnecessary. This is even more odd as the Privacy Policy is given as a normal link.

Sadly there is no standard for the name of such an email - all your suggestions are used. But consider the following:

  • Verification Email - used when you can still access services, but need to verify your email in the meantime.
  • Activation Email - used when services (account) are not accessible until email activation takes place. You can argue that there is some more urgency in 'activating' than in 'verifying'.
  • Confirmation Email - I prefer to think of this as something sent as a confirmation of something (purchase confirmation, password change confirmation). You can say that the email is to confirm the user's email address.

Here are a few examples to get you started (starting with my favourite):

The Noun Project

Please Verify your Noun Project account

Noun Project Email

The good:

  • Very minimalistic design.

The bad:

  • email subject and content terms don't match. Subject says 'Verify' while content says 'Activate'.
  • No need for the 'Activate Account' heading. It is redundant to the button, which is the primary action point.
  • Link contrast somewhat low.

MailChimp

Activate your MailChimp account.

MailChimp Activation Email

The good:

  • Monkey and "Just one more step..." make the system appear more fun and the sentence should motivate people to click on the button.

The bad:

  • No need for the line asking people to click on the button. Most people should get it without these instructions (and even if they won't get it - people often try the most probable possible action when inconclusive).
  • Few will care for the address of the company, or the copyright clause at this point and user eyes will most often skip this. The address of the company does promote trust, but such soft goal is likely to have already been satisfied prior registrations.
  • No links in case the email was sent by mistake, or if people have problems when clicking the button.

Pinterest

Please confirm your email

Pinterest Confirmation Email

The good:

  • Nice design.

The bad:

  • Again, no real need for the sentence next to the button.
  • Two exclamation marks can be considered style that is not ideal. Exclamation marks should be used sparingly for a very specific desired effect.
  • The long link is ugly, and in my view unnecessary. This is even more odd as the Privacy Policy is given as a normal link.
3 deleted 133 characters in body
source | link

Sadly there is no standard for the name of such an email - all your suggestions are used. But consider the following:

  • Verification Email - used when you can still access services, but need to verify youyour email in the meantime.
  • Activation Email - used when services (account) are not accessible until email activation takes place. You can argue that there is some more urgency in 'activating' than in 'verifying'.
  • Confirmation Email - I prefer thinkingto think of this isas something sendsent as a confirmation of something (purchase confirmation, password change confirmation). You can say that the email is to confirm the user's email address, but term can result some confusion when you write it on the site: "We have sent you a confirmation email. Please confirm your email".

Here are a few examples to get you started (starting with my favourite):

The Noun Project

Please Verify your Noun Project account

Noun Project Email

The good:

  • Very minimalistic design.

The bad:

  • email subject and content terms don't match. Subject says 'Verify' while content says 'Activate'.
  • No need for the 'Activate Account' heading. It is redundant to the button, which is the primary action point.
  • Link contrast somewhat low.

MailChimp

Activate your MailChimp account.

MailChimp Activation Email

The good:

  • Monkey and "Just one more step..." make the system appear more fun and the sentence should motivate people to click on the button.

The bad:

  • No need for the line asking people to click on the button. People should get it without these instructions.
  • Nobody cares for the address of the company, or the copyright clause. Users eyes will skip this.
  • No links in case the email was sent by mistake, or if people have problems when clicking the button.

Pinterest

Please confirm your email

Pinterest Confirmation Email

The good:

  • Nice design.

The bad:

  • Again, no real need for the sentence next to the button.
  • Two exclamation marks can be considered style that is not ideal. Exclamation marks should be used sparingly for a very specific desired effect.
  • The long link is ugly, and in my view unnecessary. This is even more odd as the Privacy Policy is given as a normal link.

Sadly there is no standard for the name of such an email - all your suggestions are used. But consider the following:

  • Verification Email - used when you can still access services, but need to verify you email in the meantime.
  • Activation Email - used when services (account) are not accessible until email activation takes place. You can argue that there is some more urgency in 'activating' than in 'verifying'.
  • Confirmation Email - I prefer thinking of this is something send as a confirmation of something (purchase confirmation, password change confirmation). You can say that the email is to confirm the user's email address, but term can result some confusion when you write it on the site: "We have sent you a confirmation email. Please confirm your email".

Here are a few examples to get you started (starting with my favourite):

The Noun Project

Please Verify your Noun Project account

Noun Project Email

The good:

  • Very minimalistic design.

The bad:

  • email subject and content terms don't match. Subject says 'Verify' while content says 'Activate'.
  • No need for the 'Activate Account' heading. It is redundant to the button, which is the primary action point.
  • Link contrast somewhat low.

MailChimp

Activate your MailChimp account.

MailChimp Activation Email

The good:

  • Monkey and "Just one more step..." make the system appear more fun and the sentence should motivate people to click on the button.

The bad:

  • No need for the line asking people to click on the button. People should get it without these instructions.
  • Nobody cares for the address of the company, or the copyright clause. Users eyes will skip this.
  • No links in case the email was sent by mistake, or if people have problems when clicking the button.

Pinterest

Please confirm your email

Pinterest Confirmation Email

The good:

  • Nice design.

The bad:

  • Again, no real need for the sentence next to the button.
  • Two exclamation marks can be considered style that is not ideal. Exclamation marks should be used sparingly for a very specific desired effect.
  • The long link is ugly, and in my view unnecessary. This is even more odd as the Privacy Policy is given as a normal link.

Sadly there is no standard for the name of such an email - all your suggestions are used. But consider the following:

  • Verification Email - used when you can still access services, but need to verify your email in the meantime.
  • Activation Email - used when services (account) are not accessible until email activation takes place. You can argue that there is some more urgency in 'activating' than in 'verifying'.
  • Confirmation Email - I prefer to think of this as something sent as a confirmation of something (purchase confirmation, password change confirmation). You can say that the email is to confirm the user's email address.

Here are a few examples to get you started (starting with my favourite):

The Noun Project

Please Verify your Noun Project account

Noun Project Email

The good:

  • Very minimalistic design.

The bad:

  • email subject and content terms don't match. Subject says 'Verify' while content says 'Activate'.
  • No need for the 'Activate Account' heading. It is redundant to the button, which is the primary action point.
  • Link contrast somewhat low.

MailChimp

Activate your MailChimp account.

MailChimp Activation Email

The good:

  • Monkey and "Just one more step..." make the system appear more fun and the sentence should motivate people to click on the button.

The bad:

  • No need for the line asking people to click on the button. People should get it without these instructions.
  • Nobody cares for the address of the company, or the copyright clause. Users eyes will skip this.
  • No links in case the email was sent by mistake, or if people have problems when clicking the button.

Pinterest

Please confirm your email

Pinterest Confirmation Email

The good:

  • Nice design.

The bad:

  • Again, no real need for the sentence next to the button.
  • Two exclamation marks can be considered style that is not ideal. Exclamation marks should be used sparingly for a very specific desired effect.
  • The long link is ugly, and in my view unnecessary. This is even more odd as the Privacy Policy is given as a normal link.
2 added 1767 characters in body
source | link

Sadly there is no standard for the name of such an email - all your suggestions are used. I prefer 'Verification' as I find it most reflective to whatBut consider the email is for - verifying your email.following:

  • Verification Email - used when you can still access services, but need to verify you email in the meantime.
  • Activation Email - used when services (account) are not accessible until email activation takes place. You can argue that there is some more urgency in 'activating' than in 'verifying'.
  • Confirmation Email - I prefer thinking of this is something send as a confirmation of something (purchase confirmation, password change confirmation). You can say that the email is to confirm the user's email address, but term can result some confusion when you write it on the site: "We have sent you a confirmation email. Please confirm your email".

Here are a few examples to get you started (starting with my favourite):

The Noun Project

Please Verify your Noun Project account

Noun Project Email

The good:

  • Very minimalistic design.

The bad:

  • email subject and content terms don't match. Subject says 'Verify' while content says 'Activate'.
  • No need for the 'Activate Account' heading. It is redundant to the button, which is the primary action point.
  • Link contrast somewhat low.

MailChimp

Activate your MailChimp account.

MailChimp Activation Email

The good:

  • Monkey and "Just one more step..." make the system appear more fun and the sentence should motivate people to click on the button.

The bad:

  • No need for the line asking people to click on the button. People should get it without these instructions.
  • Nobody cares for the address of the company, or the copyright clause. Users eyes will skip this.
  • No links in case the email was sent by mistake, or if people have problems when clicking the button.

Pinterest

Please confirm your email

Pinterest Confirmation Email

The good:

  • Nice design.

The bad:

  • Again, no real need for the sentence next to the button.
  • Two exclamation marks can be considered style that is not ideal. Exclamation marks should be used sparingly for a very specific desired effect.
  • The long link is ugly, and in my view unnecessary. This is even more odd as the Privacy Policy is given as a normal link.

Sadly there is no standard for the name of such an email - all your suggestions are used. I prefer 'Verification' as I find it most reflective to what the email is for - verifying your email.

Here are a few examples to get you started (starting with my favourite):

The Noun Project

Please Verify your Noun Project account

Noun Project Email

MailChimp

Activate your MailChimp account.

MailChimp Activation Email

Pinterest

Please confirm your email

Pinterest Confirmation Email

Sadly there is no standard for the name of such an email - all your suggestions are used. But consider the following:

  • Verification Email - used when you can still access services, but need to verify you email in the meantime.
  • Activation Email - used when services (account) are not accessible until email activation takes place. You can argue that there is some more urgency in 'activating' than in 'verifying'.
  • Confirmation Email - I prefer thinking of this is something send as a confirmation of something (purchase confirmation, password change confirmation). You can say that the email is to confirm the user's email address, but term can result some confusion when you write it on the site: "We have sent you a confirmation email. Please confirm your email".

Here are a few examples to get you started (starting with my favourite):

The Noun Project

Please Verify your Noun Project account

Noun Project Email

The good:

  • Very minimalistic design.

The bad:

  • email subject and content terms don't match. Subject says 'Verify' while content says 'Activate'.
  • No need for the 'Activate Account' heading. It is redundant to the button, which is the primary action point.
  • Link contrast somewhat low.

MailChimp

Activate your MailChimp account.

MailChimp Activation Email

The good:

  • Monkey and "Just one more step..." make the system appear more fun and the sentence should motivate people to click on the button.

The bad:

  • No need for the line asking people to click on the button. People should get it without these instructions.
  • Nobody cares for the address of the company, or the copyright clause. Users eyes will skip this.
  • No links in case the email was sent by mistake, or if people have problems when clicking the button.

Pinterest

Please confirm your email

Pinterest Confirmation Email

The good:

  • Nice design.

The bad:

  • Again, no real need for the sentence next to the button.
  • Two exclamation marks can be considered style that is not ideal. Exclamation marks should be used sparingly for a very specific desired effect.
  • The long link is ugly, and in my view unnecessary. This is even more odd as the Privacy Policy is given as a normal link.
1
source | link