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You need skeuomorphs for a new technology. It trumps OS consistency in that respect. But, above and beyond that, OS consistency is more important.

Found an article which resonated with my views. Ignore the MS vs Apple thing. http://www.cultofmac.com/180084/where-microsoft-has-more-taste-than-apple/

Traditionally, skeuomorphic design has been used to make cheap things look like their more expensive alternatives.

This is in relation to the origin of the term/trend of mimicking highly desirable artifacts using low quality products.

Skeuomorphic Design Is Cheesy: Skeuomorphic design is mostly about trickery and fakery to make unsophisticated people feel like the cheap thing they’re getting is the better thing they really want.

For example, the Find My Friends App is designed to look like a roughly sewn leather “thing.” There is no analog or traditional equivalent to an app that uses GPS to locate other people. Apple is just willy nilly deciding that this functionality should be encased in leather.

The article goes on to argue why the calendar, podcast app(old one), and other skeuomorphic designs are just odd.

My belief is, you should use the skeuomorphic design in moderation. And, rather than using that as your skin, try offering it as a 'theme'. Once, the user gets used to the 'new technology' he can switch to a more native theme and be more productive than being restricted.

On topic of the OS consistency, it is nearly impossible to have every app be consistent with your OS. You have guidelines and restrictions in the market space but you need to cut some slack. Skeuomorphic apps totally break the OS consistency (so far they seem to do it) in the sense, if you look at Mac OS X, it is a nice sleek and modern look. Thin menu bar, a trendy launchpad, nice fonts and then you have the fugly skeuomorph apps like calendar. Do you think regular users need help in using a calendar? No! It's just plain silly to do it just to make the first time user feel "Awww!", "Oh!", "Cute" whatever, but after a while it is boring and restricts the amount of functionality provided by a 'normal' design.

You need skeuomorphs during the onboarding process in a radically new technology. Like some of the touch interactions apple introduced with iphone. But, for regular purposes, it borders on cheesy to annoying. For one, it generally ends up taking more screen space than a regular design. It definitely breaks the OS consistency and it locks down the user with that interface even when the user is familiar with the technology.

Edit:

Just came across a design principle which is applicable in this case. Be consistent, not uniform.

Wherever possible we should use the same language and the same design patterns — this helps people get familiar with our services. But, when this isn’t possible, we should make sure our underlying approach is consistent. So our users will have a reasonable chance of guessing what they’re supposed to do.

This is theThe same approach which should be taken when thinking of implementing skeuomorphs. Even if you are not being 'consistent', your underlying design thinking should be uniform.

You need skeuomorphs for a new technology. It trumps OS consistency in that respect. But, above and beyond that, OS consistency is more important.

Found an article which resonated with my views. Ignore the MS vs Apple thing. http://www.cultofmac.com/180084/where-microsoft-has-more-taste-than-apple/

Traditionally, skeuomorphic design has been used to make cheap things look like their more expensive alternatives.

This is in relation to the origin of the term/trend of mimicking highly desirable artifacts using low quality products.

Skeuomorphic Design Is Cheesy: Skeuomorphic design is mostly about trickery and fakery to make unsophisticated people feel like the cheap thing they’re getting is the better thing they really want.

For example, the Find My Friends App is designed to look like a roughly sewn leather “thing.” There is no analog or traditional equivalent to an app that uses GPS to locate other people. Apple is just willy nilly deciding that this functionality should be encased in leather.

The article goes on to argue why the calendar, podcast app(old one), and other skeuomorphic designs are just odd.

My belief is, you should use the skeuomorphic design in moderation. And, rather than using that as your skin, try offering it as a 'theme'. Once, the user gets used to the 'new technology' he can switch to a more native theme and be more productive than being restricted.

On topic of the OS consistency, it is nearly impossible to have every app be consistent with your OS. You have guidelines and restrictions in the market space but you need to cut some slack. Skeuomorphic apps totally break the OS consistency (so far they seem to do it) in the sense, if you look at Mac OS X, it is a nice sleek and modern look. Thin menu bar, a trendy launchpad, nice fonts and then you have the fugly skeuomorph apps like calendar. Do you think regular users need help in using a calendar? No! It's just plain silly to do it just to make the first time user feel "Awww!", "Oh!", "Cute" whatever, but after a while it is boring and restricts the amount of functionality provided by a 'normal' design.

You need skeuomorphs during the onboarding process in a radically new technology. Like some of the touch interactions apple introduced with iphone. But, for regular purposes, it borders on cheesy to annoying. For one, it generally ends up taking more screen space than a regular design. It definitely breaks the OS consistency and it locks down the user with that interface even when the user is familiar with the technology.

Edit:

Just came across a design principle which is applicable in this case. Be consistent, not uniform.

Wherever possible we should use the same language and the same design patterns — this helps people get familiar with our services. But, when this isn’t possible, we should make sure our underlying approach is consistent. So our users will have a reasonable chance of guessing what they’re supposed to do.

This is the same approach which should be taken when thinking of implementing skeuomorphs. Even if you are not being 'consistent', your underlying design thinking should be uniform.

You need skeuomorphs for a new technology. It trumps OS consistency in that respect. But, above and beyond that, OS consistency is more important.

Found an article which resonated with my views. Ignore the MS vs Apple thing. http://www.cultofmac.com/180084/where-microsoft-has-more-taste-than-apple/

Traditionally, skeuomorphic design has been used to make cheap things look like their more expensive alternatives.

This is in relation to the origin of the term/trend of mimicking highly desirable artifacts using low quality products.

Skeuomorphic Design Is Cheesy: Skeuomorphic design is mostly about trickery and fakery to make unsophisticated people feel like the cheap thing they’re getting is the better thing they really want.

For example, the Find My Friends App is designed to look like a roughly sewn leather “thing.” There is no analog or traditional equivalent to an app that uses GPS to locate other people. Apple is just willy nilly deciding that this functionality should be encased in leather.

The article goes on to argue why the calendar, podcast app(old one), and other skeuomorphic designs are just odd.

My belief is, you should use the skeuomorphic design in moderation. And, rather than using that as your skin, try offering it as a 'theme'. Once, the user gets used to the 'new technology' he can switch to a more native theme and be more productive than being restricted.

On topic of the OS consistency, it is nearly impossible to have every app be consistent with your OS. You have guidelines and restrictions in the market space but you need to cut some slack. Skeuomorphic apps totally break the OS consistency (so far they seem to do it) in the sense, if you look at Mac OS X, it is a nice sleek and modern look. Thin menu bar, a trendy launchpad, nice fonts and then you have the fugly skeuomorph apps like calendar. Do you think regular users need help in using a calendar? No! It's just plain silly to do it just to make the first time user feel "Awww!", "Oh!", "Cute" whatever, but after a while it is boring and restricts the amount of functionality provided by a 'normal' design.

You need skeuomorphs during the onboarding process in a radically new technology. Like some of the touch interactions apple introduced with iphone. But, for regular purposes, it borders on cheesy to annoying. For one, it generally ends up taking more screen space than a regular design. It definitely breaks the OS consistency and it locks down the user with that interface even when the user is familiar with the technology.

Edit:

Just came across a design principle which is applicable in this case. Be consistent, not uniform.

Wherever possible we should use the same language and the same design patterns — this helps people get familiar with our services. But, when this isn’t possible, we should make sure our underlying approach is consistent. So our users will have a reasonable chance of guessing what they’re supposed to do.

The same approach should be taken when thinking of implementing skeuomorphs. Even if you are not being 'consistent', your underlying design thinking should be uniform.

2 added 604 characters in body
source | link

You need skeuomorphs for a new technology. It trumps OS consistency in that respect. But, above and beyond that, OS consistency is more important.

Found an article which resonated with my views. Ignore the MS vs Apple thing. http://www.cultofmac.com/180084/where-microsoft-has-more-taste-than-apple/

Traditionally, skeuomorphic design has been used to make cheap things look like their more expensive alternatives.

This is in relation to the origin of the term/trend of mimicking highly desirable artifacts using low quality products.

Skeuomorphic Design Is Cheesy: Skeuomorphic design is mostly about trickery and fakery to make unsophisticated people feel like the cheap thing they’re getting is the better thing they really want.

For example, the Find My Friends App is designed to look like a roughly sewn leather “thing.” There is no analog or traditional equivalent to an app that uses GPS to locate other people. Apple is just willy nilly deciding that this functionality should be encased in leather.

The article goes on to argue why the calendar, podcast app(old one), and other skeuomorphic designs are just odd.

My belief is, you should use the skeuomorphic design in moderation. And, rather than using that as your skin, try offering it as a 'theme'. Once, the user gets used to the 'new technology' he can switch to a more native theme and be more productive than being restricted.

On topic of the OS consistency, it is nearly impossible to have every app be consistent with your OS. You have guidelines and restrictions in the market space but you need to cut some slack. Skeuomorphic apps totally break the OS consistency (so far they seem to do it) in the sense, if you look at Mac OS X, it is a nice sleek and modern look. Thin menu bar, a trendy launchpad, nice fonts and then you have the fugly skeuomorph apps like calendar. Do you think regular users need help in using a calendar? No! It's just plain silly to do it just to make the first time user feel "Awww!", "Oh!", "Cute" whatever, but after a while it is boring and restricts the amount of functionality provided by a 'normal' design.

You need skeuomorphs during the onboarding process in a radically new technology. Like some of the touch interactions apple introduced with iphone. But, for regular purposes, it borders on cheesy to annoying. For one, it generally ends up taking more screen space than a regular design. It definitely breaks the OS consistency and it locks down the user with that interface even when the user is familiar with the technology.

Edit:

Just came across a design principle which is applicable in this case. Be consistent, not uniform.

Wherever possible we should use the same language and the same design patterns — this helps people get familiar with our services. But, when this isn’t possible, we should make sure our underlying approach is consistent. So our users will have a reasonable chance of guessing what they’re supposed to do.

This is the same approach which should be taken when thinking of implementing skeuomorphs. Even if you are not being 'consistent', your underlying design thinking should be uniform.

You need skeuomorphs for a new technology. It trumps OS consistency in that respect. But, above and beyond that, OS consistency is more important.

Found an article which resonated with my views. Ignore the MS vs Apple thing. http://www.cultofmac.com/180084/where-microsoft-has-more-taste-than-apple/

Traditionally, skeuomorphic design has been used to make cheap things look like their more expensive alternatives.

This is in relation to the origin of the term/trend of mimicking highly desirable artifacts using low quality products.

Skeuomorphic Design Is Cheesy: Skeuomorphic design is mostly about trickery and fakery to make unsophisticated people feel like the cheap thing they’re getting is the better thing they really want.

For example, the Find My Friends App is designed to look like a roughly sewn leather “thing.” There is no analog or traditional equivalent to an app that uses GPS to locate other people. Apple is just willy nilly deciding that this functionality should be encased in leather.

The article goes on to argue why the calendar, podcast app(old one), and other skeuomorphic designs are just odd.

My belief is, you should use the skeuomorphic design in moderation. And, rather than using that as your skin, try offering it as a 'theme'. Once, the user gets used to the 'new technology' he can switch to a more native theme and be more productive than being restricted.

On topic of the OS consistency, it is nearly impossible to have every app be consistent with your OS. You have guidelines and restrictions in the market space but you need to cut some slack. Skeuomorphic apps totally break the OS consistency (so far they seem to do it) in the sense, if you look at Mac OS X, it is a nice sleek and modern look. Thin menu bar, a trendy launchpad, nice fonts and then you have the fugly skeuomorph apps like calendar. Do you think regular users need help in using a calendar? No! It's just plain silly to do it just to make the first time user feel "Awww!", "Oh!", "Cute" whatever, but after a while it is boring and restricts the amount of functionality provided by a 'normal' design.

You need skeuomorphs during the onboarding process in a radically new technology. Like some of the touch interactions apple introduced with iphone. But, for regular purposes, it borders on cheesy to annoying. For one, it generally ends up taking more screen space than a regular design. It definitely breaks the OS consistency and it locks down the user with that interface even when the user is familiar with the technology.

You need skeuomorphs for a new technology. It trumps OS consistency in that respect. But, above and beyond that, OS consistency is more important.

Found an article which resonated with my views. Ignore the MS vs Apple thing. http://www.cultofmac.com/180084/where-microsoft-has-more-taste-than-apple/

Traditionally, skeuomorphic design has been used to make cheap things look like their more expensive alternatives.

This is in relation to the origin of the term/trend of mimicking highly desirable artifacts using low quality products.

Skeuomorphic Design Is Cheesy: Skeuomorphic design is mostly about trickery and fakery to make unsophisticated people feel like the cheap thing they’re getting is the better thing they really want.

For example, the Find My Friends App is designed to look like a roughly sewn leather “thing.” There is no analog or traditional equivalent to an app that uses GPS to locate other people. Apple is just willy nilly deciding that this functionality should be encased in leather.

The article goes on to argue why the calendar, podcast app(old one), and other skeuomorphic designs are just odd.

My belief is, you should use the skeuomorphic design in moderation. And, rather than using that as your skin, try offering it as a 'theme'. Once, the user gets used to the 'new technology' he can switch to a more native theme and be more productive than being restricted.

On topic of the OS consistency, it is nearly impossible to have every app be consistent with your OS. You have guidelines and restrictions in the market space but you need to cut some slack. Skeuomorphic apps totally break the OS consistency (so far they seem to do it) in the sense, if you look at Mac OS X, it is a nice sleek and modern look. Thin menu bar, a trendy launchpad, nice fonts and then you have the fugly skeuomorph apps like calendar. Do you think regular users need help in using a calendar? No! It's just plain silly to do it just to make the first time user feel "Awww!", "Oh!", "Cute" whatever, but after a while it is boring and restricts the amount of functionality provided by a 'normal' design.

You need skeuomorphs during the onboarding process in a radically new technology. Like some of the touch interactions apple introduced with iphone. But, for regular purposes, it borders on cheesy to annoying. For one, it generally ends up taking more screen space than a regular design. It definitely breaks the OS consistency and it locks down the user with that interface even when the user is familiar with the technology.

Edit:

Just came across a design principle which is applicable in this case. Be consistent, not uniform.

Wherever possible we should use the same language and the same design patterns — this helps people get familiar with our services. But, when this isn’t possible, we should make sure our underlying approach is consistent. So our users will have a reasonable chance of guessing what they’re supposed to do.

This is the same approach which should be taken when thinking of implementing skeuomorphs. Even if you are not being 'consistent', your underlying design thinking should be uniform.

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source | link

You need skeuomorphs for a new technology. It trumps OS consistency in that respect. But, above and beyond that, OS consistency is more important.

Found an article which resonated with my views. Ignore the MS vs Apple thing. http://www.cultofmac.com/180084/where-microsoft-has-more-taste-than-apple/

Traditionally, skeuomorphic design has been used to make cheap things look like their more expensive alternatives.

This is in relation to the origin of the term/trend of mimicking highly desirable artifacts using low quality products.

Skeuomorphic Design Is Cheesy: Skeuomorphic design is mostly about trickery and fakery to make unsophisticated people feel like the cheap thing they’re getting is the better thing they really want.

For example, the Find My Friends App is designed to look like a roughly sewn leather “thing.” There is no analog or traditional equivalent to an app that uses GPS to locate other people. Apple is just willy nilly deciding that this functionality should be encased in leather.

The article goes on to argue why the calendar, podcast app(old one), and other skeuomorphic designs are just odd.

My belief is, you should use the skeuomorphic design in moderation. And, rather than using that as your skin, try offering it as a 'theme'. Once, the user gets used to the 'new technology' he can switch to a more native theme and be more productive than being restricted.

On topic of the OS consistency, it is nearly impossible to have every app be consistent with your OS. You have guidelines and restrictions in the market space but you need to cut some slack. Skeuomorphic apps totally break the OS consistency (so far they seem to do it) in the sense, if you look at Mac OS X, it is a nice sleek and modern look. Thin menu bar, a trendy launchpad, nice fonts and then you have the fugly skeuomorph apps like calendar. Do you think regular users need help in using a calendar? No! It's just plain silly to do it just to make the first time user feel "Awww!", "Oh!", "Cute" whatever, but after a while it is boring and restricts the amount of functionality provided by a 'normal' design.

You need skeuomorphs during the onboarding process in a radically new technology. Like some of the touch interactions apple introduced with iphone. But, for regular purposes, it borders on cheesy to annoying. For one, it generally ends up taking more screen space than a regular design. It definitely breaks the OS consistency and it locks down the user with that interface even when the user is familiar with the technology.