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The main thing on the user's mind might be the price range for the shortest possible period of rent, whether that's per day/week/month.

First determine whether the user is prepared to rent for daily and/or weekly and/or monthly periods.

Example 1:

Let's say the user is thinking of days as the shortest term - ask the user for two numbers:

  • the lowest price per day (you equate that to monthly, off peak)
  • the highest price per day (you equate that to daily, peak).

Then populate the grid automatically, highlighting the cells corresponding to their lowest and highest price, and you allow the user to nudge the transition points if required.

Example 2:

Now let's say the user is thinking of weekly as the shortest term - ask the user for two numbers:

  • the lowest price per week (you equate that to monthly, off peak)
  • the highest price per week (you equate that to weekly, peak).

Then populate the grid as before, but this time you hide or disable the daily column.

This way you help the owner start off thinking in the time periods, and price ranges they already have in mind. Then you do the hard work, but let them tweak.

You can then treat the user's definition of low/high/peak as a separate chunk of information.

This is more of an outline than a spec of course, but you get the idea.

But you could add some nice little confidence boosting features like a competitivity rating bar that lets them see whether they are pricing themselves too high or too low.

The main thing on the user's mind might be the price range for the shortest possible period of rent, whether that's per day/week/month.

First determine whether the user is prepared to rent for daily and/or weekly and/or monthly periods.

Example 1:

Let's say the user is thinking of days as the shortest term - ask the user for two numbers:

  • the lowest price per day (you equate that to monthly, off peak)
  • the highest price per day (you equate that to daily, peak).

Then populate the grid automatically, highlighting the cells corresponding to their lowest and highest price, and you allow the user to nudge the transition points if required.

Example 2:

Now let's say the user is thinking of weekly as the shortest term - ask the user for two numbers:

  • the lowest price per week (you equate that to monthly, off peak)
  • the highest price per week (you equate that to weekly, peak).

Then populate the grid as before, but this time you hide or disable the daily column.

This way you help the owner start off thinking in the time periods, and price ranges they already have in mind. Then you do the hard work, but let them tweak.

This is more of an outline than a spec of course, but you get the idea.

But you could add some nice little confidence boosting features like a competitivity rating bar that lets them see whether they are pricing themselves too high or too low.

The main thing on the user's mind might be the price range for the shortest possible period of rent, whether that's per day/week/month.

First determine whether the user is prepared to rent for daily and/or weekly and/or monthly periods.

Example 1:

Let's say the user is thinking of days as the shortest term - ask the user for two numbers:

  • the lowest price per day (you equate that to monthly, off peak)
  • the highest price per day (you equate that to daily, peak).

Then populate the grid automatically, highlighting the cells corresponding to their lowest and highest price, and you allow the user to nudge the transition points if required.

Example 2:

Now let's say the user is thinking of weekly as the shortest term - ask the user for two numbers:

  • the lowest price per week (you equate that to monthly, off peak)
  • the highest price per week (you equate that to weekly, peak).

Then populate the grid as before, but this time you hide or disable the daily column.

This way you help the owner start off thinking in the time periods, and price ranges they already have in mind. Then you do the hard work, but let them tweak.

You can then treat the user's definition of low/high/peak as a separate chunk of information.

This is more of an outline than a spec of course, but you get the idea.

But you could add some nice little confidence boosting features like a competitivity rating bar that lets them see whether they are pricing themselves too high or too low.

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The main thing on the user's mind might be the price range for the shortest possible period of rent, whether that's per day/week/month.

First determine whether the user is prepared to rent for daily and/or weekly and/or monthly periods.

Example 1:

Let's say the user is thinking of days as the shortest term - ask the user for two numbers:

  • the lowest price per day (you equate that to monthly, off peak)
  • the highest price per day (you equate that to daily, peak).

Then populate the grid automatically, highlighting the cells corresponding to their lowest and highest price, and you allow the user to nudge the transition points if required.

Example 2:

Now let's say the user is thinking of weekly as the shortest term - ask the user for two numbers:

  • the lowest price per week (you equate that to monthly, off peak)
  • the highest price per week (you equate that to weekly, peak).

Then populate the grid as before, but this time you hide or disable the daily column.

This way you help the owner start off thinking in the time periods, and price ranges they already have in mind. Then you do the hard work, but let them tweak.

This is more of an outline than a spec of course, but you get the idea.

But you could add some nice little confidence boosting features like a competitivity rating bar that lets them see whether they are pricing themselves too high or too low.