4 inserted a quotation from the linked source so that when the link breaks, the answer still has value
source | link

There is an old article I got from the ACM library on Human-Computer-Interaction that provides some useful feedback.

(The ACM library is not very intuitive, but Microsoft have a PDF version of it)

An initial study attempted to demonstrate that users are significantly more productive and more satisfied when carrying out complex, multiple window tasks across larger screen surfaces. In the user study reported, users carried out multiple-step, cognitively loaded tasks on both a 15" and a 46.5" display (using triple projections). Users were significantly faster working on the large display. In addition, all but one participant preferred carrying out the tasks on the larger display surface, and user satisfaction measures were significantly better for the larger display. […] We have also indicated a variety of user interface redesign ideas for the traditional GUI desktop that would better support large display surface users, including designs that leave windows layouts open and available to the user, and better cursor "travel" and visualization techniques. It is our intention to further refine our ideas, including novel window and task management software UI ideas.

The simple answer to your question is- yes, users want multiple windows. Based on research, according to the article, the average user has 4 active windows on screen at any one time. For me personally, I kind of see this question as a no-brainer. When was the last time anyone only used one window?

Microsoft... what were they thinking?

There is an old article I got from the ACM library on Human-Computer-Interaction that provides some useful feedback.

(The ACM library is not very intuitive, but Microsoft have a PDF version of it)

The simple answer to your question is- yes, users want multiple windows. Based on research, according to the article, the average user has 4 active windows on screen at any one time. For me personally, I kind of see this question as a no-brainer. When was the last time anyone only used one window?

Microsoft... what were they thinking?

There is an old article I got from the ACM library on Human-Computer-Interaction that provides some useful feedback.

(The ACM library is not very intuitive, but Microsoft have a PDF version of it)

An initial study attempted to demonstrate that users are significantly more productive and more satisfied when carrying out complex, multiple window tasks across larger screen surfaces. In the user study reported, users carried out multiple-step, cognitively loaded tasks on both a 15" and a 46.5" display (using triple projections). Users were significantly faster working on the large display. In addition, all but one participant preferred carrying out the tasks on the larger display surface, and user satisfaction measures were significantly better for the larger display. […] We have also indicated a variety of user interface redesign ideas for the traditional GUI desktop that would better support large display surface users, including designs that leave windows layouts open and available to the user, and better cursor "travel" and visualization techniques. It is our intention to further refine our ideas, including novel window and task management software UI ideas.

The simple answer to your question is- yes, users want multiple windows. Based on research, according to the article, the average user has 4 active windows on screen at any one time. For me personally, I kind of see this question as a no-brainer. When was the last time anyone only used one window?

Microsoft... what were they thinking?

3 Replaced original link with the one suggested by Dan D.
source | link

There is an old article I got from the ACM library on Human-Computer-Interaction that provides some useful feedback.

(The ACM library is not very intuitive. I found a copy of it in Google docs. You will have to scan through the doc to find the exact area, but you can look at 'pg. 15 para 4 Conclusion'but Microsoft have a PDF version of it)

The simple answer to your question is- yes, users want multiple windows. Based on research, according to the article, the average user has 4 active windows on screen at any one time. For me personally, I kind of see this question as a no-brainer. When was the last time anyone only used one window?

Microsoft... what were they thinking?

There is an old article I got from the ACM library on Human-Computer-Interaction that provides some useful feedback.

(The ACM library is not very intuitive. I found a copy of it in Google docs. You will have to scan through the doc to find the exact area, but you can look at 'pg. 15 para 4 Conclusion')

The simple answer to your question is- yes, users want multiple windows. Based on research, according to the article, the average user has 4 active windows on screen at any one time. For me personally, I kind of see this question as a no-brainer. When was the last time anyone only used one window?

Microsoft... what were they thinking?

There is an old article I got from the ACM library on Human-Computer-Interaction that provides some useful feedback.

(The ACM library is not very intuitive, but Microsoft have a PDF version of it)

The simple answer to your question is- yes, users want multiple windows. Based on research, according to the article, the average user has 4 active windows on screen at any one time. For me personally, I kind of see this question as a no-brainer. When was the last time anyone only used one window?

Microsoft... what were they thinking?

2 Added link into the answer that was provided in the comments.
source | link

I tried to findThere is an old article I got from the ACM libraryACM library on Human-Computer-Interaction for you, but it's turning outthat provides some useful feedback.

(The ACM library is not very intuitive. I found a copy of it in Google docs. You will have to bescan through the proverbial needle in a haystackdoc to find the exact area, but you can look at 'pg. 15 para 4 Conclusion')

The simple answer to your question is- yes, users want multiple windows. Based on research, according to the article, the average user has 4 active windows on screen at any one time. For me personally, I kind of see this question as a no-brainer. When was the last time anyone only used one window?

Microsoft... what were they thinking?

I tried to find an old article I got from the ACM library on Human-Computer-Interaction for you, but it's turning out to be the proverbial needle in a haystack. The simple answer to your question is- yes, users want multiple windows. Based on research, according to the article, the average user has 4 active windows on screen at any one time. For me personally, I kind of see this question as a no-brainer. When was the last time anyone only used one window?

Microsoft... what were they thinking?

There is an old article I got from the ACM library on Human-Computer-Interaction that provides some useful feedback.

(The ACM library is not very intuitive. I found a copy of it in Google docs. You will have to scan through the doc to find the exact area, but you can look at 'pg. 15 para 4 Conclusion')

The simple answer to your question is- yes, users want multiple windows. Based on research, according to the article, the average user has 4 active windows on screen at any one time. For me personally, I kind of see this question as a no-brainer. When was the last time anyone only used one window?

Microsoft... what were they thinking?

1
source | link