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Both mouse and keyboard have their own universal language. Mouse has it's move, hover, click, drag, drop, double-click, right-click, wheel up/down, middle-click style universal language.

Keyboard has Tab, Enter, Shift-Tab, Ctrl-Tab, Cursor keys, Shift+Cursor keys, Ctrl-C/X/V/Z/A/Y, Ctrl-W, PgUp, PgDn, Home, End etc. That is called CUA (Common User Access) standard and is quite compatible across operating systems.

Similar to how we can explore an application with mouse, we can actually explore an application using keyboard too. When I want to check out the menu I just press Alt on Windows and navigate with cursor keys. Or I hold Alt key and see what gets underlined and press that letter.

When you learn that universal language once, learning application specific functionality for keyboard may not be too different than the mouse. You actually perform the same ritual with mouse too only you're not aware of it. When you use your paint program, if the icon is unfamiliar, you hover on it to learn what it does, and when you do that in some cases you are presented with a shortcut key in paranthesesparentheses too.

Despite their commonality there are two very important differences between the two:

  • Keyboard navigation is more sequential hence lacks "direct pointing" and dragging abilities
  • Mouse sucks at typing :)

That means they are complementary and can be more efficient than the other in certain scenarios. I think Jeff Atwood's approach about leveraging both when which is more efficient is very sane.

Both mouse and keyboard have their own universal language. Mouse has it's move, hover, click, drag, drop, double-click, right-click, wheel up/down, middle-click style universal language.

Keyboard has Tab, Enter, Shift-Tab, Ctrl-Tab, Cursor keys, Shift+Cursor keys, Ctrl-C/X/V/Z/A/Y, Ctrl-W, PgUp, PgDn, Home, End etc. That is called CUA (Common User Access) standard and is quite compatible across operating systems.

Similar to how we can explore an application with mouse, we can actually explore an application using keyboard too. When I want to check out the menu I just press Alt on Windows and navigate with cursor keys. Or I hold Alt key and see what gets underlined and press that letter.

When you learn that universal language once, learning application specific functionality for keyboard may not be too different than the mouse. You actually perform the same ritual with mouse too only you're not aware of it. When you use your paint program, if the icon is unfamiliar, you hover on it to learn what it does, and when you do that in some cases you are presented with a shortcut key in parantheses too.

Despite their commonality there are two very important differences between the two:

  • Keyboard navigation is more sequential hence lacks "direct pointing" and dragging abilities
  • Mouse sucks at typing :)

That means they are complementary and can be more efficient than the other in certain scenarios. I think Jeff Atwood's approach about leveraging both when which is more efficient is very sane.

Both mouse and keyboard have their own universal language. Mouse has it's move, hover, click, drag, drop, double-click, right-click, wheel up/down, middle-click style universal language.

Keyboard has Tab, Enter, Shift-Tab, Ctrl-Tab, Cursor keys, Shift+Cursor keys, Ctrl-C/X/V/Z/A/Y, Ctrl-W, PgUp, PgDn, Home, End etc. That is called CUA (Common User Access) standard and is quite compatible across operating systems.

Similar to how we can explore an application with mouse, we can actually explore an application using keyboard too. When I want to check out the menu I just press Alt on Windows and navigate with cursor keys. Or I hold Alt key and see what gets underlined and press that letter.

When you learn that universal language once, learning application specific functionality for keyboard may not be too different than the mouse. You actually perform the same ritual with mouse too only you're not aware of it. When you use your paint program, if the icon is unfamiliar, you hover on it to learn what it does, and when you do that in some cases you are presented with a shortcut key in parentheses too.

Despite their commonality there are two very important differences between the two:

  • Keyboard navigation is more sequential hence lacks "direct pointing" and dragging abilities
  • Mouse sucks at typing :)

That means they are complementary and can be more efficient than the other in certain scenarios. I think Jeff Atwood's approach about leveraging both when which is more efficient is very sane.

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source | link

Both mouse and keyboard have their own universal language. Mouse has it's move, hover, click, drag, drop, double-click, right-click, wheel up/down, middle-click style universal language.

Keyboard has Tab, Enter, Shift-Tab, Ctrl-Tab, Cursor keys, Shift+Cursor keys, Ctrl-C/X/V/Z/A/Y, Ctrl-W, PgUp, PgDn, Home, End etc. That is called CUA (Common User Access) standard and is quite compatible across operating systems.

Similar to how we can explore an application with mouse, we can actually explore an application using keyboard too. When I want to check out the menu I just press Alt on Windows and navigate with cursor keys. Or I hold Alt key and see what gets underlined and press that letter.

When you learn that universal language once, learning application specific functionality for keyboard may not be too different than the mouse. You actually perform the same ritual with mouse too only you're not aware of it. When you use your paint program, if the icon is unfamiliar, you hover on it to learn what it does, and when you do that in some cases you are presented with a shortcut key in parantheses too.

Despite their commonality there are two very important differences between the two:

  • Keyboard navigation is more sequential hence lacks "direct pointing" and dragging abilities
  • Mouse sucks at typing :)

That means they are complementary and can be more efficient than the other in certain scenarios. I think Jeff Atwood's approach about leveraging both when which is more efficient is very sane.