3 deleted 9 characters in body
source | link

I usually like to show an error message on top that summarizes all errors on the page, plus in each location, highlight what is wrong.

For example with a form, on top you would say that email, phone and address are required, and in the form, set all of these three fields in red with a text along the lines of "this field is required" (or something something more specific, depending on how it failed a requirementthe requirements).

However, I usually keep the error message [on top] always open (because quite a few customers complained the message was gone before they're finisheddone reading it, so leaving it open instead(instead of disappearing after a few seconds) made everyone happy).


So in short for your question, yes they will be trained to look on top (Twitter does it too for example), it's the natural thing to look when something suddendly moves, but if you can add extra hints, so much the better. And I might suggest not to auto-hide the message, give a "close" button option instead (I quite like how StackExchange does it personally).

I usually like to show an error message on top that summarizes all errors on the page, plus in each location, highlight what is wrong.

For example with a form, on top you would say that email, phone and address are required, and in the form, set all of these three fields in red with a text along the lines of "this field is required" (or something something more specific, depending on how it failed a requirement).

However, I usually keep the error message [on top] always open (because quite a few customers complained the message was gone before they're finished reading it, so leaving it open instead of disappearing after a few seconds made everyone happy).


So in short for your question, yes they will be trained to look on top (Twitter does it too for example), it's the natural thing to look when something suddendly moves, but if you can add extra hints, so much the better. And I might suggest not to auto-hide the message, give a "close" button option instead (I quite like how StackExchange does it personally).

I usually like to show an error message on top that summarizes all errors on the page, plus in each location, highlight what is wrong.

For example with a form, on top you would say that email, phone and address are required, and in the form, set all of these three fields in red with a text along the lines of "this field is required" (or something more specific, depending on how it failed the requirements).

However, I usually keep the error message [on top] always open (because quite a few customers complained the message was gone before they're done reading it, so leaving it open (instead of disappearing after a few seconds) made everyone happy).


So in short for your question, yes they will be trained to look on top (Twitter does it too for example), it's the natural thing to look when something suddendly moves, but if you can add extra hints, so much the better. And I might suggest not to auto-hide the message, give a "close" button option instead (I quite like how StackExchange does it personally).

2 added 375 characters in body; added 52 characters in body; deleted 12 characters in body; added 8 characters in body
source | link

I usually like to show an error message on top that summarizes all errorserror message on top that summarizes all errors on the page, plu,s in each location, highlight what is wrongplus in each location, highlight what is wrong.

For example with a form, on top you would say that email, phone and address are required, and in the form, set all of these three fields in red with a text along the lines of "this field is required" (or something something more specific, depending on how it failed a requirement).

However, I usually keep the error message [on top] always open (because quite a few customers complained the message was gone before they're finished reading it, so leaving it open instead of disappearing after a few seconds made everyone happy).


So in short for your question, yes they will be trained to look on top (Twitter does it too for example), it's the natural thing to look when something suddendly moves, but if you can in addition giveadd extra hints, it's evenso much the better. And I might suggest not to auto-hide the message, give a "close" button option instead (I quite like how StackExchange does it personally).

I usually like to show an error message on top that summarizes all errors on the page, plu,s in each location, highlight what is wrong.

For example with a form, on top you would say that email, phone and address are required, and in the form, set all of these three fields in red with a text along the lines of "this field is required" (or something something more specific, depending on how it failed a requirement).


So in short for your question, yes they will be trained to look on top (Twitter does it too for example), it's the natural thing, but if you can in addition give extra hints, it's even better.

I usually like to show an error message on top that summarizes all errors on the page, plus in each location, highlight what is wrong.

For example with a form, on top you would say that email, phone and address are required, and in the form, set all of these three fields in red with a text along the lines of "this field is required" (or something something more specific, depending on how it failed a requirement).

However, I usually keep the error message [on top] always open (because quite a few customers complained the message was gone before they're finished reading it, so leaving it open instead of disappearing after a few seconds made everyone happy).


So in short for your question, yes they will be trained to look on top (Twitter does it too for example), it's the natural thing to look when something suddendly moves, but if you can add extra hints, so much the better. And I might suggest not to auto-hide the message, give a "close" button option instead (I quite like how StackExchange does it personally).

1
source | link

I usually like to show an error message on top that summarizes all errors on the page, plu,s in each location, highlight what is wrong.

For example with a form, on top you would say that email, phone and address are required, and in the form, set all of these three fields in red with a text along the lines of "this field is required" (or something something more specific, depending on how it failed a requirement).


So in short for your question, yes they will be trained to look on top (Twitter does it too for example), it's the natural thing, but if you can in addition give extra hints, it's even better.