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Assumptions

Assumptions

  • it's just a message to test, e.g. a tagline on your site that explains what the site/product is about, not a bunch of features at once
  • $40 is too much for that (I agree) but assumingI guess $3 would be ok
  • in personpersonal interview preferred over anonymous test (at least alwaysthis is my preference - so much richer feedback)

Try "Starbucks testing"*

Try Starbucks testing*

Here is how it works:

  • Go to a coffee house or similar place where people spend some time
  • Find people that could be users of your site/service
  • RightApproach them afterright after they bought a coffee is the moment toand ask them:
  •  
    ""YouYou just bought a coffee. Can I buy you a muffin and get two minutes of your time for a quick feedback on my website?""
  • Ask your questions and Makemake them talk as much as possible without influencing them
  • Get inspired by the answers and Findfind out if your message works

The last question, especially if the message/site didn't work well, is to explain the intention and ask them what they would have understood better. But only do this as the last thing, don't get into a debate take the comment with a grain of salt.


*I call this Starbucks testing because it works especially well in coffee houses where people are relaxed and spending some leisure time. UsuallyOften they're very open to talk to me. It might be different in other countries or cultures. I think key success factors are that they get a little reward for their time investment and to make them understand that you won't be trying to sell something.

If you want to learn more about user testing in a quick and informative way I'd also suggest Rocket surgery made easy by Steve Krug - an enjoyable and entertaining read.

Assumptions

  • it's just a message to test, e.g. a tagline on your site that explains what the site/product is about
  • $40 is too much for that (I agree) but assuming $3 would be ok
  • in person preferred (at least always my preference - so much richer feedback)

Try "Starbucks testing"*

Here is how it works:

  • Go to a coffee house or similar place where people spend some time
  • Find people that could be users of your site/service
  • Right after they bought a coffee is the moment to ask them:
  •  "You just bought a coffee. Can I buy you a muffin and get two minutes of your time for a quick feedback on my website?"
  • Make them talk as much as possible without influencing them
  • Find out if your message works

The last question, especially if the message/site didn't work well, is to explain the intention and ask them what they would have understood better. But only do this as the last thing, don't get into a debate take the comment with a grain of salt.


*I call this Starbucks testing because it works especially well in coffee houses where people are relaxed and spending some leisure time. Usually they're very open to talk to me. It might be different in other countries or cultures. I think key success factors are that they get a little reward for their time investment and to make them understand that you won't be trying to sell something.

If you want to learn more about user testing in a quick and informative way I'd also suggest Rocket surgery made easy by Steve Krug.

Assumptions

  • it's just a message to test, e.g. a tagline on your site that explains what the site/product is about, not a bunch of features at once
  • $40 is too much for that (I agree) but I guess $3 would be ok
  • personal interview preferred over anonymous test (at least this is my preference - so much richer feedback)

Try Starbucks testing*

Here is how it works:

  • Go to a coffee house or similar place where people spend some time
  • Find people that could be users of your site
  • Approach them right after they bought a coffee and ask them:
    "You just bought a coffee. Can I buy you a muffin and get two minutes of your time for a quick feedback on my website?"
  • Ask your questions and make them talk as much as possible without influencing them
  • Get inspired by the answers and find out if your message works

The last question, especially if the message/site didn't work well, is to explain the intention and ask them what they would have understood better. But only do this as the last thing, don't get into a debate take the comment with a grain of salt.


*I call this Starbucks testing because it works especially well in coffee houses where people are relaxed and spending some leisure time. Often they're open to talk. It might be different in other countries or cultures. I think key success factors are that they get a little reward for their time investment and to make them understand that you won't be trying to sell something.

If you want to learn more about user testing I'd suggest Rocket surgery made easy by Steve Krug - an enjoyable and entertaining read.

3 added 7 characters in body
source | link

Assumptions

  • it's just a message to test, e.g. a tagline on your site that explains what the site/product is about
  • $40 is too much for that (I agree) but assuming $3 would be ok
  • in person preferred (at least always my preference - so much richer feedback)

Try "Starbucks testing"*

Here is how it works:

  • Go to a coffee house or similar place where people spend some time
  • Find people that could be users of your site/service
  • Right after they bought a coffee is the moment to ask them:
  • "You just bought a coffee. Can I buy you a muffin and get two minutes of your time for a quick feedback on my website?"
  • Make them talk as much as possible without influencing them
  • Find out if your message works

The last question, especially if the message/site didn't work well, is to explain the intention and ask them what they would have understood better. But only do this as the last thing, don't get into a debate take the comment with a grain of salt.

 

*I call this Starbucks testing because it works especially well in coffee houses where people are relaxed and spending some leisure time. Usually they're very open to talk to me. It might be different in other countries or cultures. I think key success factors are that they get a little reward for their time investment and to make them understand that you won't be trying to sell something.

If you want to learn more about user testing in a quick and informative way I'd also suggest Rocket surgery made easy by Steve Krug.

Assumptions

  • it's just a message to test, e.g. a tagline on your site that explains what the site/product is about
  • $40 is too much for that (I agree) but assuming $3 would be ok
  • in person preferred (at least always my preference - so much richer feedback)

Try "Starbucks testing"*

Here is how it works:

  • Go to a coffee house or similar place where people spend some time
  • Find people that could be users of your site/service
  • Right after they bought a coffee is the moment to ask them:
  • "You just bought a coffee. Can I buy you a muffin and get two minutes of your time for a quick feedback on my website?"
  • Make them talk as much as possible without influencing them
  • Find out if your message works

The last question, especially if the message/site didn't work well, is to explain the intention and ask them what they would have understood better. But only do this as the last thing, don't get into a debate take the comment with a grain of salt.

*I call this Starbucks testing because it works especially well in coffee houses where people are relaxed and spending some leisure time. Usually they're very open to talk to me. It might be different in other countries or cultures. I think key success factors are that they get a little reward for their time investment and to make them understand that you won't be trying to sell something.

If you want to learn more about user testing in a quick and informative way I'd also suggest Rocket surgery made easy by Steve Krug.

Assumptions

  • it's just a message to test, e.g. a tagline on your site that explains what the site/product is about
  • $40 is too much for that (I agree) but assuming $3 would be ok
  • in person preferred (at least always my preference - so much richer feedback)

Try "Starbucks testing"*

Here is how it works:

  • Go to a coffee house or similar place where people spend some time
  • Find people that could be users of your site/service
  • Right after they bought a coffee is the moment to ask them:
  • "You just bought a coffee. Can I buy you a muffin and get two minutes of your time for a quick feedback on my website?"
  • Make them talk as much as possible without influencing them
  • Find out if your message works

The last question, especially if the message/site didn't work well, is to explain the intention and ask them what they would have understood better. But only do this as the last thing, don't get into a debate take the comment with a grain of salt.

 

*I call this Starbucks testing because it works especially well in coffee houses where people are relaxed and spending some leisure time. Usually they're very open to talk to me. It might be different in other countries or cultures. I think key success factors are that they get a little reward for their time investment and to make them understand that you won't be trying to sell something.

If you want to learn more about user testing in a quick and informative way I'd also suggest Rocket surgery made easy by Steve Krug.

2 added 258 characters in body
source | link

Assumptions

  • it's just a message to test, e.g. a tagline on your site that explains what the site/product is about
  • $40 is too much for that (I agree) but assuming $3 would be ok
  • in person preferred (at least always my preference - so much richer feedback)

Try "Starbucks testing"*

Here is how it works:

  • Go to a coffee house or similar place where people spend some time
  • Find people that could be users of your site/service
  • Right after they bought a coffee is the moment to ask them:
  • "You just bought a coffee. Can I buy you a muffin and get two minutes of your time for a quick feedback on my website?"
  • Enjoy the conversation and makeMake them talk as much as possible, and appreciate any feedback without influencing them
  • Find out if your message works

The last question, especially if the message/site didn't work well, is to explain the intention and ask them what they would have understood better. But only do this as the last thing, don't get into a debate take the comment with a grain of salt.

*I call this Starbucks testing because it works especially well in coffee houses where people are relaxed and spending some leisure time. Usually they're very open to talk to me. It might be different in other countries or cultures. I think key success factors are that they get a little reward for their time investment and to make them understand that you won't be trying to sell something.

If you want to learn more about user testing in a quick and informative way I'd also suggest Rocket surgery made easy by Steve Krug.

Assumptions

  • it's just a message to test, e.g. a tagline on your site that explains what the site/product is about
  • $40 is too much for that (I agree) but assuming $3 would be ok
  • in person preferred (at least always my preference - so much richer feedback)

Try "Starbucks testing"*

Here is how it works:

  • Go to a coffee house or similar place where people spend some time
  • Find people that could be users of your site/service
  • Right after they bought a coffee is the moment to ask them:
  • "You just bought a coffee. Can I buy you a muffin and get two minutes of your time for a quick feedback on my website?"
  • Enjoy the conversation and make them talk as much as possible, and appreciate any feedback

*I call this Starbucks testing because it works especially well in coffee houses where people are relaxed and spending some leisure time. Usually they're very open to talk to me. It might be different in other countries or cultures. I think key success factors are that they get a little reward for their time investment and to make them understand that you won't be trying to sell something.

If you want to learn more about user testing in a quick and informative way I'd also suggest Rocket surgery made easy by Steve Krug.

Assumptions

  • it's just a message to test, e.g. a tagline on your site that explains what the site/product is about
  • $40 is too much for that (I agree) but assuming $3 would be ok
  • in person preferred (at least always my preference - so much richer feedback)

Try "Starbucks testing"*

Here is how it works:

  • Go to a coffee house or similar place where people spend some time
  • Find people that could be users of your site/service
  • Right after they bought a coffee is the moment to ask them:
  • "You just bought a coffee. Can I buy you a muffin and get two minutes of your time for a quick feedback on my website?"
  • Make them talk as much as possible without influencing them
  • Find out if your message works

The last question, especially if the message/site didn't work well, is to explain the intention and ask them what they would have understood better. But only do this as the last thing, don't get into a debate take the comment with a grain of salt.

*I call this Starbucks testing because it works especially well in coffee houses where people are relaxed and spending some leisure time. Usually they're very open to talk to me. It might be different in other countries or cultures. I think key success factors are that they get a little reward for their time investment and to make them understand that you won't be trying to sell something.

If you want to learn more about user testing in a quick and informative way I'd also suggest Rocket surgery made easy by Steve Krug.

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