2 replaced http://ux.stackexchange.com/ with https://ux.stackexchange.com/
source | link

Between your two options, what is best would depend on whether the users are primarily Mac users (arrows) or PC users (+). In this case, you would be choosing based on established conventions of desktop applications.

If you are concerned about the collapsed arrow looking like a play button, I have seen these rendered as empty triangles when collapsed. This has the added benefit of having less visual weight too. If the icon is small enough and appears to be part of a hierarchy, anyone mistaking it for a play button will be able to learn your visual convention on first usage.

This other thread seems relevant: What's the best way to view a deep hierarchy?What's the best way to view a deep hierarchy?.

Generally speaking, collapsing / expanding deep hierarchies are not a very good user experience except in limited scenarios (typically for advanced users or power users). They also introduce many usability issues of their own, especially on the web (ie. what does BACK button do?) Instead, I suggest exploring a drill-down approach, giving users increasing relevance and focus, rather than maintaining reference points to an entire collection. If there is a clear way to return to the top (ie breadcrumbs or other visuals) then this would probably be worth exploring.

Between your two options, what is best would depend on whether the users are primarily Mac users (arrows) or PC users (+). In this case, you would be choosing based on established conventions of desktop applications.

If you are concerned about the collapsed arrow looking like a play button, I have seen these rendered as empty triangles when collapsed. This has the added benefit of having less visual weight too. If the icon is small enough and appears to be part of a hierarchy, anyone mistaking it for a play button will be able to learn your visual convention on first usage.

This other thread seems relevant: What's the best way to view a deep hierarchy?.

Generally speaking, collapsing / expanding deep hierarchies are not a very good user experience except in limited scenarios (typically for advanced users or power users). They also introduce many usability issues of their own, especially on the web (ie. what does BACK button do?) Instead, I suggest exploring a drill-down approach, giving users increasing relevance and focus, rather than maintaining reference points to an entire collection. If there is a clear way to return to the top (ie breadcrumbs or other visuals) then this would probably be worth exploring.

Between your two options, what is best would depend on whether the users are primarily Mac users (arrows) or PC users (+). In this case, you would be choosing based on established conventions of desktop applications.

If you are concerned about the collapsed arrow looking like a play button, I have seen these rendered as empty triangles when collapsed. This has the added benefit of having less visual weight too. If the icon is small enough and appears to be part of a hierarchy, anyone mistaking it for a play button will be able to learn your visual convention on first usage.

This other thread seems relevant: What's the best way to view a deep hierarchy?.

Generally speaking, collapsing / expanding deep hierarchies are not a very good user experience except in limited scenarios (typically for advanced users or power users). They also introduce many usability issues of their own, especially on the web (ie. what does BACK button do?) Instead, I suggest exploring a drill-down approach, giving users increasing relevance and focus, rather than maintaining reference points to an entire collection. If there is a clear way to return to the top (ie breadcrumbs or other visuals) then this would probably be worth exploring.

1
source | link

Between your two options, what is best would depend on whether the users are primarily Mac users (arrows) or PC users (+). In this case, you would be choosing based on established conventions of desktop applications.

If you are concerned about the collapsed arrow looking like a play button, I have seen these rendered as empty triangles when collapsed. This has the added benefit of having less visual weight too. If the icon is small enough and appears to be part of a hierarchy, anyone mistaking it for a play button will be able to learn your visual convention on first usage.

This other thread seems relevant: What's the best way to view a deep hierarchy?.

Generally speaking, collapsing / expanding deep hierarchies are not a very good user experience except in limited scenarios (typically for advanced users or power users). They also introduce many usability issues of their own, especially on the web (ie. what does BACK button do?) Instead, I suggest exploring a drill-down approach, giving users increasing relevance and focus, rather than maintaining reference points to an entire collection. If there is a clear way to return to the top (ie breadcrumbs or other visuals) then this would probably be worth exploring.