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Well as adrianh pointed out it depends on who your user base is and what is "disablity" you are looking at. I have found that certain methods work better with certain groups:

  1. People with spinal cord/muscular disablities : I have found that Participatory design to be very useful in working with spinal cord/muscular disabilities as they are often willing to provide inputs on why specific designs would work and how they would like a specific design to be. The act of involving them at an early stage also allows the researcher insight into the challenges faced by them and the unique methodologies used by them face those challenges.However, I have found that usability testing is greatly disliked by most people with disabilities (unless they were part of the design process) as they consensus is that the design was implemented without considering the issues faced by them

  2. Visually impaired people : If you are just trying to gather information about a potential application,standard methods like interviews work just great.However you should be aware of the challenge of trying to depict the functionality of the application to them.however if needed,initial usability testing can also be done by the use of screen readers to which would help the user in navigating around the application.Also look at options of providing braille cards for card sorting if that's an option for you.This is a good read: Usability Tips and Tools for the Visually Impaired on the Web

  3. Deaf people : You can conduct standard usability tests or card sorting exercises but ensure that the objective of the exercise is communicated clearly through written text or by the user of visual graphics which clearly explain what the user is expected to do to achieve what goal.Also ensure you have plenty of spare materials (papers,post it notes) around which can be used to communicate what you are trying to do and what you would like them to do next

Improving Deaf Accessibility in Remote Usability Testing

I haven't worked with mute people or got the opportunity to observe any of my professors/friends work with them so I cant comment on what works and what doesn't but I would imagine that communication would be the key driving factor and the users should be provided with material which would help them communicate by using their other senses such as eyes,years and physical actions such as writing it out or even acting it out.

Great Question !

These are some excellent links I found with regards to interacting with people with disabilities while working with them :

Well as adrianh pointed out it depends on who your user base is and what is "disablity" you are looking at. I have found that certain methods work better with certain groups:

  1. People with spinal cord/muscular disablities : I have found that Participatory design to be very useful in working with spinal cord/muscular disabilities as they are often willing to provide inputs on why specific designs would work and how they would like a specific design to be. The act of involving them at an early stage also allows the researcher insight into the challenges faced by them and the unique methodologies used by them face those challenges.However, I have found that usability testing is greatly disliked by most people with disabilities (unless they were part of the design process) as they consensus is that the design was implemented without considering the issues faced by them

  2. Visually impaired people : If you are just trying to gather information about a potential application,standard methods like interviews work just great.However you should be aware of the challenge of trying to depict the functionality of the application to them.however if needed,initial usability testing can also be done by the use of screen readers to which would help the user in navigating around the application.This is a good read: Usability Tips and Tools for the Visually Impaired on the Web

  3. Deaf people : You can conduct standard usability tests or card sorting exercises but ensure that the objective of the exercise is communicated clearly through written text or by the user of visual graphics which clearly explain what the user is expected to do to achieve what goal.Also ensure you have plenty of spare materials (papers,post it notes) around which can be used to communicate what you are trying to do and what you would like them to do next

Improving Deaf Accessibility in Remote Usability Testing

I haven't worked with mute people or got the opportunity to observe any of my professors/friends work with them so I cant comment on what works and what doesn't but I would imagine that communication would be the key driving factor and the users should be provided with material which would help them communicate by using their other senses such as eyes,years and physical actions such as writing it out or even acting it out.

Great Question !

Well as adrianh pointed out it depends on who your user base is and what is "disablity" you are looking at. I have found that certain methods work better with certain groups:

  1. People with spinal cord/muscular disablities : I have found that Participatory design to be very useful in working with spinal cord/muscular disabilities as they are often willing to provide inputs on why specific designs would work and how they would like a specific design to be. The act of involving them at an early stage also allows the researcher insight into the challenges faced by them and the unique methodologies used by them face those challenges.However, I have found that usability testing is greatly disliked by most people with disabilities (unless they were part of the design process) as they consensus is that the design was implemented without considering the issues faced by them

  2. Visually impaired people : If you are just trying to gather information about a potential application,standard methods like interviews work just great.However you should be aware of the challenge of trying to depict the functionality of the application to them.however if needed,initial usability testing can also be done by the use of screen readers to which would help the user in navigating around the application.Also look at options of providing braille cards for card sorting if that's an option for you.This is a good read: Usability Tips and Tools for the Visually Impaired on the Web

  3. Deaf people : You can conduct standard usability tests or card sorting exercises but ensure that the objective of the exercise is communicated clearly through written text or by the user of visual graphics which clearly explain what the user is expected to do to achieve what goal.Also ensure you have plenty of spare materials (papers,post it notes) around which can be used to communicate what you are trying to do and what you would like them to do next

Improving Deaf Accessibility in Remote Usability Testing

I haven't worked with mute people or got the opportunity to observe any of my professors/friends work with them so I cant comment on what works and what doesn't but I would imagine that communication would be the key driving factor and the users should be provided with material which would help them communicate by using their other senses such as eyes,years and physical actions such as writing it out or even acting it out.

Great Question !

These are some excellent links I found with regards to interacting with people with disabilities while working with them :

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source | link

Well as adrianh pointed out it depends on who your user base is and what is "disablity" you are looking at. I have found that certain methods work better with certain groups:

  1. People with spinal cord/muscular disablities : I have found that Participatory design to be very useful in working with spinal cord/muscular disabilities as they are often willing to provide inputs on why specific designs would work and how they would like a specific design to be. The act of involving them at an early stage also allows the researcher insight into the challenges faced by them and the unique methodologies used by them face those challenges.However, I have found that usability testing is greatly disliked by most people with disabilities (unless they were part of the design process) as they consensus is that the design was implemented without considering the issues faced by them

  2. Visually impaired people : If you are just trying to gather information about a potential application,standard methods like interviews work just great.However you should be aware of the challenge of trying to depict the functionality of the application to them.however if needed,initial usability testing can also be done by the use of screen readers to which would help the user in navigating around the application.This is a good read: Usability Tips and Tools for the Visually Impaired on the Web

  3. Deaf people : You can conduct standard usability tests or card sorting exercises but ensure that the objective of the exercise is communicated clearly through written text or by the user of visual graphics which clearly explain what the user is expected to do to achieve what goal.Also ensure you have plenty of spare materials (papers,post it notes) around which can be used to communicate what you are trying to do and what you would like them to do next

Improving Deaf Accessibility in Remote Usability Testing

I haven't worked with mute people or got the opportunity to observe any of my professors/friends work with them so I cant comment on what works and what doesn't but I would imagine that communication would be the key driving factor and the users should be provided with material which would help them communicate by using their other senses such as eyes,years and physical actions such as writing it out or even acting it out.

Great Question !