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It completely depends on the product and target audience.

In many large corporate environments running line of business apps, version numbers are a critical part of the release process. The IT guys want to know that this specific version of that application is supported on these operating systems and without that info you're not getting installed.

Similarly, if you mention that your app will auto-update their clients underneath them then you'll be politely shown the door.

If, on the other hand you're deploying directly onto end-users desktops then you have more latitude to be a bit more 21st century about things.

If the application can share data with other products or versions of itself then versions also become important - if you have the latest version you may not be able to share data with other users who have older versions, so people need a way of identifying exactly what they have.

However it could be argued that those aren't "typical" usage patterns. To answer the question - I don't think end users directly care about version numbers, butalthough they might care that their appinstalled version is "the latest". EndJust remember that end users might not be your only customer though!

It completely depends on the product and target audience.

In many large corporate environments running line of business apps, version numbers are a critical part of the release process. The IT guys want to know that this specific version of that application is supported on these operating systems and without that info you're not getting installed.

Similarly, if you mention that your app will auto-update their clients underneath them then you'll be politely shown the door.

If, on the other hand you're deploying directly onto end-users desktops then you have more latitude to be a bit more 21st century about things.

To answer the question - I don't think end users care about version numbers, but they might care that their app is "the latest". End users might not be your only customer though!

It completely depends on the product and target audience.

In many large corporate environments running line of business apps, version numbers are a critical part of the release process. The IT guys want to know that this specific version of that application is supported on these operating systems and without that info you're not getting installed.

Similarly, if you mention that your app will auto-update their clients underneath them then you'll be politely shown the door.

If, on the other hand you're deploying directly onto end-users desktops then you have more latitude to be a bit more 21st century about things.

If the application can share data with other products or versions of itself then versions also become important - if you have the latest version you may not be able to share data with other users who have older versions, so people need a way of identifying exactly what they have.

However it could be argued that those aren't "typical" usage patterns. To answer the question - I don't think end users directly care about version numbers, although they might care that their installed version is "the latest". Just remember that end users might not be your only customer!

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source | link

It completely depends on the product and target audience.

In many large corporate environments running line of business apps, version numbers are a critical part of the release process. The IT guys want to know that this specific version of that application is supported on these operating systems and without that info you're not getting installed.

Similarly, if you mention that your app will auto-update their clients underneath them then you'll be politely shown the door.

If, on the other hand you're deploying directly onto end-users desktops then you have more latitude to be a bit more 21st century about things.

To answer the question - I don't think end users care about version numbers, but they might care that their app is "the latest". End users might not be your only customer though!