2 Added images and link text
source | link

Unless you are using colour in an application where it could be mistaken as a signal (for example traffic signs), it is actually a very good colour to use to draw attention to something.

This has been confirmed by testing. Some examples of testing results:

http://dmix.ca/2010/05/how-we-increased-our-conversion-rate-by-72/ http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/20566/Button-Color-Test-Red-Beats-Green.aspx 

That said, it is still useful to do A/B testing on your specific audience and see what works best for you.

Some examples of testing results:

How We Improved Our Conversion Rate by 72%

Green vs red buttons at Dmix

2) Changing our signup button from Green to Red

Earlier this week I came across an article by Performable that explained how changing their call-to-action from green to red increased conversion by 21%.

I had to try it out so that day I set up an A/B test on our homepage call-to-action.

So far we’ve had 600 participants and our conversion rate has increased 34%.

The Button Color A/B Test: Red Beats Green

Green vs red button at HubSpot

The result? The red button outperformed the green button by 21%.

21% more people clicked on the red button than on the green button. Everything else on the pages was the same, so it was only the button color that made this difference. This was a much larger difference that I expected.

Unless you are using colour in an application where it could be mistaken as a signal (for example traffic signs), it is actually a very good colour to use to draw attention to something.

This has been confirmed by testing. Some examples of testing results:

http://dmix.ca/2010/05/how-we-increased-our-conversion-rate-by-72/ http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/20566/Button-Color-Test-Red-Beats-Green.aspx

That said, it is still useful to do A/B testing on your specific audience and see what works best for you.

Unless you are using colour in an application where it could be mistaken as a signal (for example traffic signs), it is actually a very good colour to use to draw attention to something.

This has been confirmed by testing.  

That said, it is still useful to do A/B testing on your specific audience and see what works best for you.

Some examples of testing results:

How We Improved Our Conversion Rate by 72%

Green vs red buttons at Dmix

2) Changing our signup button from Green to Red

Earlier this week I came across an article by Performable that explained how changing their call-to-action from green to red increased conversion by 21%.

I had to try it out so that day I set up an A/B test on our homepage call-to-action.

So far we’ve had 600 participants and our conversion rate has increased 34%.

The Button Color A/B Test: Red Beats Green

Green vs red button at HubSpot

The result? The red button outperformed the green button by 21%.

21% more people clicked on the red button than on the green button. Everything else on the pages was the same, so it was only the button color that made this difference. This was a much larger difference that I expected.

1
source | link

Unless you are using colour in an application where it could be mistaken as a signal (for example traffic signs), it is actually a very good colour to use to draw attention to something.

This has been confirmed by testing. Some examples of testing results:

http://dmix.ca/2010/05/how-we-increased-our-conversion-rate-by-72/ http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/20566/Button-Color-Test-Red-Beats-Green.aspx

That said, it is still useful to do A/B testing on your specific audience and see what works best for you.