4 edited title
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I've always wondered something, about how Maps (and a lot of other apps, like the native iOS weather app) convert city names and street names to Hangul (the Korean alphabet), as apposed to leaving them in English. (I have my phone is Korean as an attempt to aid myself in learning Korean)

The picture at the bottom is of somewhere near downtown Orlando. Wouldn't it be more useful if they remained in English? I can only see pros to doing so:

  1. If they were in English, a Korean-only speaker would still be able to match the symbols to the physical street signs, something they could not do if they had no idea how to pronounce the letters and

  2. A Korean-only speaker unfamiliar with the area would have a very difficult time showing the map to someone native to the area to help get further, more detailed instructions.

  3. Lastly, these are names, so these can't possibly all be official translations and, in my opinion, more likely to contain errors, making finding a street with the map potentially more difficult than it was originally.

Especially on the flip side, where someone from the US traveling to South Korea is a lot less likely to understand the pronunciation rules of Hangul. I would think it'd be much easier to navigate if the name displayed in Maps were as physically accurate as possible.

What are the pros to converting the alphabet in these cases?

enter image description hereiPhone 8 Plus iOS 11

Just in case, I've taken a screenshot in the same area with a Pixel 2 XL on Android 8.1 with the same behavior, so it more assuredly is the app doing the transliteration instead of the OS

Pixel 2 XL Android 8.2

I've always wondered something, about how Maps (and a lot of other apps, like the native iOS weather app) convert city names and street names to Hangul (the Korean alphabet), as apposed to leaving them in English. (I have my phone is Korean as an attempt to aid myself in learning Korean)

The picture at the bottom is of somewhere near downtown Orlando. Wouldn't it be more useful if they remained in English? I can only see pros to doing so:

  1. If they were in English, a Korean-only speaker would still be able to match the symbols to the physical street signs, something they could not do if they had no idea how to pronounce the letters and

  2. A Korean-only speaker unfamiliar with the area would have a very difficult time showing the map to someone native to the area to help get further, more detailed instructions.

  3. Lastly, these are names, so these can't possibly all be official translations and, in my opinion, more likely to contain errors, making finding a street with the map potentially more difficult than it was originally.

Especially on the flip side, where someone from the US traveling to South Korea is a lot less likely to understand the pronunciation rules of Hangul. I would think it'd be much easier to navigate if the name displayed in Maps were as physically accurate as possible.

What are the pros to converting the alphabet in these cases?

enter image description here

I've always wondered something, about how Maps (and a lot of other apps, like the native iOS weather app) convert city names and street names to Hangul (the Korean alphabet), as apposed to leaving them in English. (I have my phone is Korean as an attempt to aid myself in learning Korean)

The picture at the bottom is of somewhere near downtown Orlando. Wouldn't it be more useful if they remained in English? I can only see pros to doing so:

  1. If they were in English, a Korean-only speaker would still be able to match the symbols to the physical street signs, something they could not do if they had no idea how to pronounce the letters and

  2. A Korean-only speaker unfamiliar with the area would have a very difficult time showing the map to someone native to the area to help get further, more detailed instructions.

  3. Lastly, these are names, so these can't possibly all be official translations and, in my opinion, more likely to contain errors, making finding a street with the map potentially more difficult than it was originally.

Especially on the flip side, where someone from the US traveling to South Korea is a lot less likely to understand the pronunciation rules of Hangul. I would think it'd be much easier to navigate if the name displayed in Maps were as physically accurate as possible.

What are the pros to converting the alphabet in these cases?

iPhone 8 Plus iOS 11

Just in case, I've taken a screenshot in the same area with a Pixel 2 XL on Android 8.1 with the same behavior, so it more assuredly is the app doing the transliteration instead of the OS

Pixel 2 XL Android 8.2

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Why does Google Maps translate/transliterate English street names to Hangul?

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    Bumped by Community user
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    Bumped by Community user
    Tweeted twitter.com/StackUX/status/948852483740389376
2 added 271 characters in body
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I've always wondered something, about how Maps (and a lot of other apps, like the native iOS weather app) convert city names and street names to Hangul (the Korean alphabet), as apposed to leaving them in English. (I have my phone is Korean as an attempt to aid myself in learning Korean)

The picture at the bottom is of somewhere near downtown Orlando. Wouldn't it be more useful if they remained in English? I can only see pros to doing so:

  1. If they were in English, a Korean-only speaker would still be able to match the symbols to the physical street signs, something they could not do if they had no idea how to pronounce the letters and

  2. A Korean-only speaker unfamiliar with the area would have a very difficult time showing the map to someone native to the area to help get further, more detailed instructions.

  3. Lastly, these are names, so these can't possibly all be official translations and, in my opinion, more likely to contain errors, making finding a street with the map potentially more difficult than it was originally.

Especially on the flip side, where someone from the US traveling to South Korea is a lot less likely to understand the pronunciation rules of Hangul. I would think it'd be much easier to navigate if the name displayed in Maps were as physically accurate as possible.

What are the pros to converting the alphabet in these cases? 

enter image description here

I've always wondered something, about how Maps (and a lot of other apps, like the native iOS weather app) convert city names and street names to Hangul (the Korean alphabet), as apposed to leaving them in English. (I have my phone is Korean as an attempt to aid myself in learning Korean)

The picture at the bottom is of somewhere near downtown Orlando. Wouldn't it be more useful if they remained in English? I can only see pros to doing so:

  1. If they were in English, a Korean-only speaker would still be able to match the symbols to the physical street signs, something they could not do if they had no idea how to pronounce the letters and

  2. A Korean-only speaker unfamiliar with the area would have a very difficult time showing the map to someone native to the area to help get further, more detailed instructions.

  3. Lastly, these are names, so these can't possibly all be official translations and, in my opinion, more likely to contain errors, making finding a street with the map potentially more difficult than it was originally.

What are the pros to converting the alphabet in these cases?

enter image description here

I've always wondered something, about how Maps (and a lot of other apps, like the native iOS weather app) convert city names and street names to Hangul (the Korean alphabet), as apposed to leaving them in English. (I have my phone is Korean as an attempt to aid myself in learning Korean)

The picture at the bottom is of somewhere near downtown Orlando. Wouldn't it be more useful if they remained in English? I can only see pros to doing so:

  1. If they were in English, a Korean-only speaker would still be able to match the symbols to the physical street signs, something they could not do if they had no idea how to pronounce the letters and

  2. A Korean-only speaker unfamiliar with the area would have a very difficult time showing the map to someone native to the area to help get further, more detailed instructions.

  3. Lastly, these are names, so these can't possibly all be official translations and, in my opinion, more likely to contain errors, making finding a street with the map potentially more difficult than it was originally.

Especially on the flip side, where someone from the US traveling to South Korea is a lot less likely to understand the pronunciation rules of Hangul. I would think it'd be much easier to navigate if the name displayed in Maps were as physically accurate as possible.

What are the pros to converting the alphabet in these cases? 

enter image description here

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