3 Adding block quoting for third-party content.
source | link

It's a balancing act... you want the option to add promo codes available to those who need it, but to not have it on the radar for those who don't.

Here are some hard statistics on the effect of coupon codes on cart abandonment: In one usability test, removing the coupon code field increased overall conversion from 3.8% to 5.1% (an increase of 34%). In another study by PayPal/comScore, 27% of users said that "wanting to look for a coupon" was a "very important reason" for abandoning their cart.

Get Elastic has, hands-down, the best list of suggestions for combatting this problem: "6 Ways to Tackle the Promo Code Problem". Their suggestions are as follows:

  1. Use targeted selling rules: Don't have promo codes at all; simply send custom "pre-discounted" links to targeted users (as you suggest).
  2. Issue private promo codes: Link promo codes to the specific user, so they can't be shared. My concern with this approach is it still suggests the availability of a coupon to someone who isn't you, and may still harm conversion (even as it protects your margins).
  3. Use the promo box to build your email list: Provide a tip near the promo code field prompting people to sign up for your newsletter (for instance).
  4. Link to your own offer page: Keep people on your site by giving them your own coupons (as Macys.com does)
  5. Bank on synonyms: Avoid the words "coupon" and "discount" when labeling the field. I don't care for this approach for most use cases, though, as users are trained to understand most of the suggested lesser-known synonyms at this point.
  6. Don’t make it a box: Normally, UX is about reducing the number of steps to complete a task, but in this case, you can improve the experience of your non-coupon-using customers by hiding the promo code box under a button or link that says "Have a coupon code?" This approach has worked well for me in the past.
  1. Use targeted selling rules: Don't have promo codes at all; simply send custom "pre-discounted" links to targeted users (as you suggest).
  2. Issue private promo codes: Link promo codes to the specific user, so they can't be shared. My concern with this approach is it still suggests the availability of a coupon to someone who isn't you, and may still harm conversion (even as it protects your margins).
  3. Use the promo box to build your email list: Provide a tip near the promo code field prompting people to sign up for your newsletter (for instance).
  4. Link to your own offer page: Keep people on your site by giving them your own coupons (as Macys.com does)
  5. Bank on synonyms: Avoid the words "coupon" and "discount" when labeling the field. I don't care for this approach for most use cases, though, as users are trained to understand most of the suggested lesser-known synonyms at this point.
  6. Don’t make it a box: Normally, UX is about reducing the number of steps to complete a task, but in this case, you can improve the experience of your non-coupon-using customers by hiding the promo code box under a button or link that says "Have a coupon code?" This approach has worked well for me in the past.

Ultimately, the right approach is going to be case-specific for your products and customers. Good luck!

It's a balancing act... you want the option to add promo codes available to those who need it, but to not have it on the radar for those who don't.

Here are some hard statistics on the effect of coupon codes on cart abandonment: In one usability test, removing the coupon code field increased overall conversion from 3.8% to 5.1% (an increase of 34%). In another study by PayPal/comScore, 27% of users said that "wanting to look for a coupon" was a "very important reason" for abandoning their cart.

Get Elastic has, hands-down, the best list of suggestions for combatting this problem: "6 Ways to Tackle the Promo Code Problem". Their suggestions are as follows:

  1. Use targeted selling rules: Don't have promo codes at all; simply send custom "pre-discounted" links to targeted users (as you suggest).
  2. Issue private promo codes: Link promo codes to the specific user, so they can't be shared. My concern with this approach is it still suggests the availability of a coupon to someone who isn't you, and may still harm conversion (even as it protects your margins).
  3. Use the promo box to build your email list: Provide a tip near the promo code field prompting people to sign up for your newsletter (for instance).
  4. Link to your own offer page: Keep people on your site by giving them your own coupons (as Macys.com does)
  5. Bank on synonyms: Avoid the words "coupon" and "discount" when labeling the field. I don't care for this approach for most use cases, though, as users are trained to understand most of the suggested lesser-known synonyms at this point.
  6. Don’t make it a box: Normally, UX is about reducing the number of steps to complete a task, but in this case, you can improve the experience of your non-coupon-using customers by hiding the promo code box under a button or link that says "Have a coupon code?" This approach has worked well for me in the past.

Ultimately, the right approach is going to be case-specific for your products and customers. Good luck!

It's a balancing act... you want the option to add promo codes available to those who need it, but to not have it on the radar for those who don't.

Here are some hard statistics on the effect of coupon codes on cart abandonment: In one usability test, removing the coupon code field increased overall conversion from 3.8% to 5.1% (an increase of 34%). In another study by PayPal/comScore, 27% of users said that "wanting to look for a coupon" was a "very important reason" for abandoning their cart.

Get Elastic has, hands-down, the best list of suggestions for combatting this problem: "6 Ways to Tackle the Promo Code Problem". Their suggestions are as follows:

  1. Use targeted selling rules: Don't have promo codes at all; simply send custom "pre-discounted" links to targeted users (as you suggest).
  2. Issue private promo codes: Link promo codes to the specific user, so they can't be shared. My concern with this approach is it still suggests the availability of a coupon to someone who isn't you, and may still harm conversion (even as it protects your margins).
  3. Use the promo box to build your email list: Provide a tip near the promo code field prompting people to sign up for your newsletter (for instance).
  4. Link to your own offer page: Keep people on your site by giving them your own coupons (as Macys.com does)
  5. Bank on synonyms: Avoid the words "coupon" and "discount" when labeling the field. I don't care for this approach for most use cases, though, as users are trained to understand most of the suggested lesser-known synonyms at this point.
  6. Don’t make it a box: Normally, UX is about reducing the number of steps to complete a task, but in this case, you can improve the experience of your non-coupon-using customers by hiding the promo code box under a button or link that says "Have a coupon code?" This approach has worked well for me in the past.

Ultimately, the right approach is going to be case-specific for your products and customers. Good luck!

2 Adding more detail on the context of the problem.
source | link

It's a balancing act... you want the option to add promo codes available to those who need it, but to not have it on the radar for those who don't.

Here are some hard statistics on the effect of coupon codes on cart abandonment: In one usability test, removing the coupon code field increased overall conversion from 3.8% to 5.1% (an increase of 34%). In another study by PayPal/comScore, 27% of users said that "wanting to look for a coupon" was a "very important reason" for abandoning their cart.

Get Elastic has, hands-down, the best list of suggestions for combatting this problem: "6 Ways to Tackle the Promo Code Problem". Their suggestions are as follows:

  1. Use targeted selling rules: Don't have promo codes at all; simply send custom "pre-discounted" links to targeted users (as you suggest).
  2. Issue private promo codes: Link promo codes to the specific user, so they can't be shared. My concern with this approach is it still suggests the availability of a coupon to someone who isn't you, and may still harm conversion (even as it protects your margins).
  3. Use the promo box to build your email list: Provide a tip near the promo code field prompting people to sign up for your newsletter (for instance).
  4. Link to your own offer page: Keep people on your site by giving them your own coupons (as Macys.com does)
  5. Bank on synonyms: Avoid the words "coupon" and "discount" when labeling the field. I don't care for this approach for most use cases, though, as users are trained to understand most of the suggested lesser-known synonyms at this point.
  6. Don’t make it a box: Normally, UX is about reducing the number of steps to complete a task, but in this case, you can improve the experience of your non-coupon-using customers by hiding the promo code box under a button or link that says "Have a coupon code?" This approach has worked well for me in the past.

Ultimately, the right approach is going to be case-specific for your products and customers. Good luck!

It's a balancing act... you want the option to add promo codes available to those who need it, but to not have it on the radar for those who don't.

Get Elastic has, hands-down, the best list of suggestions for combatting this problem: "6 Ways to Tackle the Promo Code Problem". Their suggestions are as follows:

  1. Use targeted selling rules: Don't have promo codes at all; simply send custom "pre-discounted" links to targeted users (as you suggest).
  2. Issue private promo codes: Link promo codes to the specific user, so they can't be shared. My concern with this approach is it still suggests the availability of a coupon to someone who isn't you, and may still harm conversion (even as it protects your margins).
  3. Use the promo box to build your email list: Provide a tip near the promo code field prompting people to sign up for your newsletter (for instance).
  4. Link to your own offer page: Keep people on your site by giving them your own coupons (as Macys.com does)
  5. Bank on synonyms: Avoid the words "coupon" and "discount" when labeling the field. I don't care for this approach for most use cases, though, as users are trained to understand most of the suggested lesser-known synonyms at this point.
  6. Don’t make it a box: Normally, UX is about reducing the number of steps to complete a task, but in this case, you can improve the experience of your non-coupon-using customers by hiding the promo code box under a button or link that says "Have a coupon code?" This approach has worked well for me in the past.

Ultimately, the right approach is going to be case-specific for your products and customers. Good luck!

It's a balancing act... you want the option to add promo codes available to those who need it, but to not have it on the radar for those who don't.

Here are some hard statistics on the effect of coupon codes on cart abandonment: In one usability test, removing the coupon code field increased overall conversion from 3.8% to 5.1% (an increase of 34%). In another study by PayPal/comScore, 27% of users said that "wanting to look for a coupon" was a "very important reason" for abandoning their cart.

Get Elastic has, hands-down, the best list of suggestions for combatting this problem: "6 Ways to Tackle the Promo Code Problem". Their suggestions are as follows:

  1. Use targeted selling rules: Don't have promo codes at all; simply send custom "pre-discounted" links to targeted users (as you suggest).
  2. Issue private promo codes: Link promo codes to the specific user, so they can't be shared. My concern with this approach is it still suggests the availability of a coupon to someone who isn't you, and may still harm conversion (even as it protects your margins).
  3. Use the promo box to build your email list: Provide a tip near the promo code field prompting people to sign up for your newsletter (for instance).
  4. Link to your own offer page: Keep people on your site by giving them your own coupons (as Macys.com does)
  5. Bank on synonyms: Avoid the words "coupon" and "discount" when labeling the field. I don't care for this approach for most use cases, though, as users are trained to understand most of the suggested lesser-known synonyms at this point.
  6. Don’t make it a box: Normally, UX is about reducing the number of steps to complete a task, but in this case, you can improve the experience of your non-coupon-using customers by hiding the promo code box under a button or link that says "Have a coupon code?" This approach has worked well for me in the past.

Ultimately, the right approach is going to be case-specific for your products and customers. Good luck!

1
source | link

It's a balancing act... you want the option to add promo codes available to those who need it, but to not have it on the radar for those who don't.

Get Elastic has, hands-down, the best list of suggestions for combatting this problem: "6 Ways to Tackle the Promo Code Problem". Their suggestions are as follows:

  1. Use targeted selling rules: Don't have promo codes at all; simply send custom "pre-discounted" links to targeted users (as you suggest).
  2. Issue private promo codes: Link promo codes to the specific user, so they can't be shared. My concern with this approach is it still suggests the availability of a coupon to someone who isn't you, and may still harm conversion (even as it protects your margins).
  3. Use the promo box to build your email list: Provide a tip near the promo code field prompting people to sign up for your newsletter (for instance).
  4. Link to your own offer page: Keep people on your site by giving them your own coupons (as Macys.com does)
  5. Bank on synonyms: Avoid the words "coupon" and "discount" when labeling the field. I don't care for this approach for most use cases, though, as users are trained to understand most of the suggested lesser-known synonyms at this point.
  6. Don’t make it a box: Normally, UX is about reducing the number of steps to complete a task, but in this case, you can improve the experience of your non-coupon-using customers by hiding the promo code box under a button or link that says "Have a coupon code?" This approach has worked well for me in the past.

Ultimately, the right approach is going to be case-specific for your products and customers. Good luck!