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2 Fixed the wrong use of the word "dialer"
source | link

Here's why:

Current Scenario

Such keyboards appear in two cases:

  • Number keyboard - Such keyboards ONLY appear when you need to dial-in a phone number or search for a contact. The need of having the letters is because of the functionality that allows the users to even type out names. People don't remember numbers anymore but traditionally, a dialer has to allow a number input. Such a keyboard would however allow you to actually type in a name.

  • T9 keyboard - Current touch phones still have the option of a T9 input pattern which is/was seen in the phones we now call "feature phones". The purpose could be throwback or for convenience (for people who have wide fingers and find it hard to hit the QWERTY keys accurately)

In the past

Feels weird to call the T9 keyboard as the "past" but yeah, let's consider it as they have almost disappeared.

For those keyboards, the letters HAD to be put with numbers as the primary action was dialing a number while text inputs were still considered secondary.

DialKeypad Telephones

Yes, physical dialerkeypad phones also had a similar keypad and even people born in the 90's (like me) won't know why. So, why did they have letterletters?

I haven't personally used it but there was a time when phone numbers used to ACTUALLY **start with letters*. The area codes weren't used to be numbers rather were actual initials.

Like RE7009 (RE=regent)

If you see advertisements from the 70's through early 90's, you'll notice the use of letters at the end of phone numbers. Like 1800-100-LOVE or 1800-100-TALK

The letters weren't actually letters but used to represent the numbers you're supposed to hit on the phone depending on the letters below them. That was because it would easier to remember 1800-100-LOVE rather than 1800-100-5683

Here's why:

Current Scenario

Such keyboards appear in two cases:

  • Number keyboard - Such keyboards ONLY appear when you need to dial-in a phone number or search for a contact. The need of having the letters is because of the functionality that allows the users to even type out names. People don't remember numbers anymore but traditionally, a dialer has to allow a number input. Such a keyboard would however allow you to actually type in a name.

  • T9 keyboard - Current touch phones still have the option of a T9 input pattern which is/was seen in the phones we now call "feature phones". The purpose could be throwback or for convenience (for people who have wide fingers and find it hard to hit the QWERTY keys accurately)

In the past

Feels weird to call the T9 keyboard as the "past" but yeah, let's consider it as they have almost disappeared.

For those keyboards, the letters HAD to be put with numbers as the primary action was dialing a number while text inputs were still considered secondary.

Dial Telephones

Yes, physical dialer phones also had a similar keypad and even people born in the 90's (like me) won't know why. So, why did they have letter?

I haven't personally used it but there was a time when phone numbers used to ACTUALLY **start with letters*. The area codes weren't used to be numbers rather were actual initials.

Like RE7009 (RE=regent)

If you see advertisements from the 70's through early 90's, you'll notice the use of letters at the end of phone numbers. Like 1800-100-LOVE or 1800-100-TALK

The letters weren't actually letters but used to represent the numbers you're supposed to hit on the phone depending on the letters below them. That was because it would easier to remember 1800-100-LOVE rather than 1800-100-5683

Here's why:

Current Scenario

Such keyboards appear in two cases:

  • Number keyboard - Such keyboards ONLY appear when you need to dial-in a phone number or search for a contact. The need of having the letters is because of the functionality that allows the users to even type out names. People don't remember numbers anymore but traditionally, a dialer has to allow a number input. Such a keyboard would however allow you to actually type in a name.

  • T9 keyboard - Current touch phones still have the option of a T9 input pattern which is/was seen in the phones we now call "feature phones". The purpose could be throwback or for convenience (for people who have wide fingers and find it hard to hit the QWERTY keys accurately)

In the past

Feels weird to call the T9 keyboard as the "past" but yeah, let's consider it as they have almost disappeared.

For those keyboards, the letters HAD to be put with numbers as the primary action was dialing a number while text inputs were still considered secondary.

Keypad Telephones

Yes, physical keypad phones also had a similar keypad and even people born in the 90's (like me) won't know why. So, why did they have letters?

I haven't personally used it but there was a time when phone numbers used to ACTUALLY **start with letters*. The area codes weren't used to be numbers rather were actual initials.

Like RE7009 (RE=regent)

If you see advertisements from the 70's through early 90's, you'll notice the use of letters at the end of phone numbers. Like 1800-100-LOVE or 1800-100-TALK

The letters weren't actually letters but used to represent the numbers you're supposed to hit on the phone depending on the letters below them. That was because it would easier to remember 1800-100-LOVE rather than 1800-100-5683

1
source | link

Here's why:

Current Scenario

Such keyboards appear in two cases:

  • Number keyboard - Such keyboards ONLY appear when you need to dial-in a phone number or search for a contact. The need of having the letters is because of the functionality that allows the users to even type out names. People don't remember numbers anymore but traditionally, a dialer has to allow a number input. Such a keyboard would however allow you to actually type in a name.

  • T9 keyboard - Current touch phones still have the option of a T9 input pattern which is/was seen in the phones we now call "feature phones". The purpose could be throwback or for convenience (for people who have wide fingers and find it hard to hit the QWERTY keys accurately)

In the past

Feels weird to call the T9 keyboard as the "past" but yeah, let's consider it as they have almost disappeared.

For those keyboards, the letters HAD to be put with numbers as the primary action was dialing a number while text inputs were still considered secondary.

Dial Telephones

Yes, physical dialer phones also had a similar keypad and even people born in the 90's (like me) won't know why. So, why did they have letter?

I haven't personally used it but there was a time when phone numbers used to ACTUALLY **start with letters*. The area codes weren't used to be numbers rather were actual initials.

Like RE7009 (RE=regent)

If you see advertisements from the 70's through early 90's, you'll notice the use of letters at the end of phone numbers. Like 1800-100-LOVE or 1800-100-TALK

The letters weren't actually letters but used to represent the numbers you're supposed to hit on the phone depending on the letters below them. That was because it would easier to remember 1800-100-LOVE rather than 1800-100-5683