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2 Reorganized points.
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Let 3 days ago === mean 3 days ago always.

If you don't plan on ever supporting due dates on weekends as your question implies, I'd go with tobybot's great suggestion that suggests adding the exact due date in parentheses to be explicit in this ambiguous situation. Additionally, if you're 24 hours overdue on a Thursday, saying "1 day ago" is not ambiguous, thus, you could skip adding the parentheses.

But I'd be cautious...

I'd argue that saying "3(not 3 business days overdue" is much less ambiguous because 3 days ago === 3 days ago always).

For example, itIt seems perfectly reasonable for a MMonday-FFriday company to want to schedule server maintenance to be due on Sunday morning when traffic to their web services is low. If youyour UI usually exclude weekendsreflects number of business days, when they come in on Monday morning, alerting them that their event is "1 day overdue" when it actually was due on Sunday morning would be difficult to communicate.

An additional benefit: by not caring about which days are business days, your UI feedback isn't dependent on keeping company holiday data up to date. 1 day means 1 day regardless of whether or not the office was open.

However...

If you plan on:

  • Never allowing due dates to be on weekends
  • Requiring business closure data to be up to date

I'd go with tobybot's great suggestion that suggests adding the exact due date in parentheses to be explicit in this ambiguous situation.

(Additionally, if you're 24 hours overdue on a Thursday, saying "1 day ago" is likely not ambiguous, thus, you could skip adding the parentheses.)

3 days ago === 3 days ago always.

If you don't plan on ever supporting due dates on weekends as your question implies, I'd go with tobybot's great suggestion that suggests adding the exact due date in parentheses to be explicit in this ambiguous situation. Additionally, if you're 24 hours overdue on a Thursday, saying "1 day ago" is not ambiguous, thus, you could skip adding the parentheses.

But I'd be cautious...

I'd argue that saying "3 days overdue" is much less ambiguous because 3 days ago === 3 days ago always.

For example, it seems perfectly reasonable for a M-F company to want to schedule server maintenance to be due on Sunday morning when traffic to their web services is low. If you usually exclude weekends, when they come in on Monday morning, alerting them that their event is "1 day overdue" when it actually was due on Sunday morning would be difficult to communicate.

Let 3 days ago mean 3 days ago (not 3 business days).

It seems perfectly reasonable for a Monday-Friday company to want to schedule server maintenance to be due on Sunday morning when traffic to their web services is low. If your UI usually reflects number of business days, when they come in on Monday morning, alerting them that their event is "1 day overdue" when it actually was due on Sunday morning would be difficult to communicate.

An additional benefit: by not caring about which days are business days, your UI feedback isn't dependent on keeping company holiday data up to date. 1 day means 1 day regardless of whether or not the office was open.

However...

If you plan on:

  • Never allowing due dates to be on weekends
  • Requiring business closure data to be up to date

I'd go with tobybot's great suggestion that suggests adding the exact due date in parentheses to be explicit in this ambiguous situation.

(Additionally, if you're 24 hours overdue on a Thursday, saying "1 day ago" is likely not ambiguous, thus, you could skip adding the parentheses.)

1
source | link

3 days ago === 3 days ago always.

If you don't plan on ever supporting due dates on weekends as your question implies, I'd go with tobybot's great suggestion that suggests adding the exact due date in parentheses to be explicit in this ambiguous situation. Additionally, if you're 24 hours overdue on a Thursday, saying "1 day ago" is not ambiguous, thus, you could skip adding the parentheses.

But I'd be cautious...

I'd argue that saying "3 days overdue" is much less ambiguous because 3 days ago === 3 days ago always.

For example, it seems perfectly reasonable for a M-F company to want to schedule server maintenance to be due on Sunday morning when traffic to their web services is low. If you usually exclude weekends, when they come in on Monday morning, alerting them that their event is "1 day overdue" when it actually was due on Sunday morning would be difficult to communicate.