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So age and gender are the two main filters that people use to start browsing clothes on a physical store and also on the web. I understand this, they are in fact the two most probable mutually exclusive criteria: "Someone who is looking for women clothes most probably isn't interested in simultaneously looking for man clothes", "Someone who looks for adult clothes isn't interested in simultaneoussimultaneously looking for kids clothes".

But this isn't really necessary in a web environment, people could just enter the store and see all products and then have the filters at their disposal, including the typically "man" and "women" filter that is commonly showed on a main menu (in my case "girl", "boy" and "unisex"). This is helpful in my case where i think soon to be mothers would like to browse kids clothes without having to limit the browsing to a gender or age. Why? Because the gender of the baby may be unknown and although they could browse the "unisex" department they may also like to see the options for boy and girl simultaneous. The may have twins, a boy and a girl, and would rather shop for both of them at a time. They may also like to browse clothes for 3 month old and 6 month old at the same time, babies grow very fast and mothers sometimes purchase clothes for different ages. In conclusion, age and gender are not as mutually exclusive in babies.

So age and gender are the two main filters that people use to start browsing clothes on a physical store and also on the web. I understand this, they are in fact the two most probable mutually exclusive criteria: "Someone who is looking for women clothes most probably isn't interested in simultaneously looking for man clothes", "Someone who looks for adult clothes isn't interested in simultaneous looking for kids clothes".

But this isn't really necessary in a web environment, people could just enter the store and see all products and then have the filters at their disposal, including the typically "man" and "women" filter that is commonly showed on a main menu (in my case "girl", "boy" and "unisex"). This is helpful in my case where i think soon to be mothers would like to browse kids clothes without having to limit the browsing to a gender or age. Why? Because the gender of the baby may be unknown and although they could browse the "unisex" department they may also like to see the options for boy and girl simultaneous. They may also like to browse clothes for 3 month old and 6 month old at the same time, babies grow very fast and mothers sometimes purchase clothes for different ages.

So age and gender are the two main filters that people use to start browsing clothes on a physical store and also on the web. I understand this, they are in fact the two most probable mutually exclusive criteria: "Someone who is looking for women clothes most probably isn't interested in simultaneously looking for man clothes", "Someone who looks for adult clothes isn't interested in simultaneously looking for kids clothes".

But this isn't really necessary in a web environment, people could just enter the store and see all products and then have the filters at their disposal, including the typically "man" and "women" filter that is commonly showed on a main menu (in my case "girl", "boy" and "unisex"). This is helpful in my case where i think soon to be mothers would like to browse kids clothes without having to limit the browsing to a gender or age. Why? Because the gender of the baby may be unknown and although they could browse the "unisex" department they may also like to see the options for boy and girl simultaneous. The may have twins, a boy and a girl, and would rather shop for both of them at a time. They may also like to browse clothes for 3 month old and 6 month old at the same time, babies grow very fast and mothers sometimes purchase clothes for different ages. In conclusion, age and gender are not as mutually exclusive in babies.

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How to show a costumerconsumer products in a eCommerce Site with only filters?

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Hot How to show a costumer products in a eCommerce Site with only filters?

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