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I posted an answer here that I think addresses this concern in some detail.

Auto-save is a great feature where the user's work may take some time (like long forms and document editing). You spare them the mental overhead of remembering to save as they go.

Don't send the wrong message

If your system is saving incrementally as work is completed, but you also provide a Save button, the user is left to wonder what that auto-save is really doing.

Is it really saved?
Do I need to click this button too?
If I click Save will I leave the form?

Why put your users through such anxiety? Make up your mind and decide on the right pattern: manual or automatic save.

Clear visual cues

Because forms are often manually saved (for better or worse) you need to make it very clear to your users if you decide to go against that. Here are some visual cues I've used and have performed well.

Auto-save visual indictors

Provide a way out

Users occasionally (often?) change their minds. If you've been saving their work along the way, you need to provide an easy way to reverse that work. There are several features that make this work well, especially in data-critical applications.

  • Field-level undo
  • Cancel and discard all changes
  • Change log with ability to revert (for admins)

I posted an answer here that I think addresses this concern in some detail.

Auto-save is a great feature where the user's work may take some time (like long forms and document editing). You spare them the mental overhead of remembering to save as they go.

Don't send the wrong message

If your system is saving incrementally as work is completed, but you also provide a Save button, the user is left to wonder what that auto-save is really doing.

Is it really saved?
Do I need to click this button too?
If I click Save will I leave the form?

Why put your users through such anxiety? Make up your mind and decide on the right pattern: manual or automatic save.

Clear visual cues

Because forms are often manually saved (for better or worse) you need to make it very clear to your users if you decide to go against that. Here are some visual cues I've used and have performed well.

Auto-save visual indictors

I posted an answer here that I think addresses this concern in some detail.

Auto-save is a great feature where the user's work may take some time (like long forms and document editing). You spare them the mental overhead of remembering to save as they go.

Don't send the wrong message

If your system is saving incrementally as work is completed, but you also provide a Save button, the user is left to wonder what that auto-save is really doing.

Is it really saved?
Do I need to click this button too?
If I click Save will I leave the form?

Why put your users through such anxiety? Make up your mind and decide on the right pattern: manual or automatic save.

Clear visual cues

Because forms are often manually saved (for better or worse) you need to make it very clear to your users if you decide to go against that. Here are some visual cues I've used and have performed well.

Auto-save visual indictors

Provide a way out

Users occasionally (often?) change their minds. If you've been saving their work along the way, you need to provide an easy way to reverse that work. There are several features that make this work well, especially in data-critical applications.

  • Field-level undo
  • Cancel and discard all changes
  • Change log with ability to revert (for admins)
1
source | link

I posted an answer here that I think addresses this concern in some detail.

Auto-save is a great feature where the user's work may take some time (like long forms and document editing). You spare them the mental overhead of remembering to save as they go.

Don't send the wrong message

If your system is saving incrementally as work is completed, but you also provide a Save button, the user is left to wonder what that auto-save is really doing.

Is it really saved?
Do I need to click this button too?
If I click Save will I leave the form?

Why put your users through such anxiety? Make up your mind and decide on the right pattern: manual or automatic save.

Clear visual cues

Because forms are often manually saved (for better or worse) you need to make it very clear to your users if you decide to go against that. Here are some visual cues I've used and have performed well.

Auto-save visual indictors