3 replaced http://ux.stackexchange.com/ with https://ux.stackexchange.com/
source | link

This should be very helpful - it's a tool that lets you simulate the appearance of colours for people with different color vision.

http://www.iamcal.com/toys/colors/

description: 1 in 12 people have some sort of color deficiency. When you're designing for the web, this means that 1 in 12 people might not be able to see your site. That's alot of people. This tool helps you simulate the appearance of our site's colors for people with different color visions. Select text and background colors from the palette below, then choose a color vision mode.

To test your website, try this:

http://colorfilter.wickline.org/

Enter the URL for the web site you want to test, and select a color blindness type. The tool will then show you the web site like the color blind user will see it. (credit to Jørn E. Angeltveit for posting it in response to http://ux.stackexchange.com/questions/71/what-are-good-resources-for-testing-ui-design-for-color-blind-usersWhat are good resources for testing UI design for color-blind users?)

Best practice? WCAG 2.0 is your friend: have a text alternative that includes information that is conveyed by color differences in the image.

more:

http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/quickref/#qr-visual-audio-contrast-without-color

This should be very helpful - it's a tool that lets you simulate the appearance of colours for people with different color vision.

http://www.iamcal.com/toys/colors/

description: 1 in 12 people have some sort of color deficiency. When you're designing for the web, this means that 1 in 12 people might not be able to see your site. That's alot of people. This tool helps you simulate the appearance of our site's colors for people with different color visions. Select text and background colors from the palette below, then choose a color vision mode.

To test your website, try this:

http://colorfilter.wickline.org/

Enter the URL for the web site you want to test, and select a color blindness type. The tool will then show you the web site like the color blind user will see it. (credit to Jørn E. Angeltveit for posting it in response to http://ux.stackexchange.com/questions/71/what-are-good-resources-for-testing-ui-design-for-color-blind-users)

Best practice? WCAG 2.0 is your friend: have a text alternative that includes information that is conveyed by color differences in the image.

more:

http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/quickref/#qr-visual-audio-contrast-without-color

This should be very helpful - it's a tool that lets you simulate the appearance of colours for people with different color vision.

http://www.iamcal.com/toys/colors/

description: 1 in 12 people have some sort of color deficiency. When you're designing for the web, this means that 1 in 12 people might not be able to see your site. That's alot of people. This tool helps you simulate the appearance of our site's colors for people with different color visions. Select text and background colors from the palette below, then choose a color vision mode.

To test your website, try this:

http://colorfilter.wickline.org/

Enter the URL for the web site you want to test, and select a color blindness type. The tool will then show you the web site like the color blind user will see it. (credit to Jørn E. Angeltveit for posting it in response to What are good resources for testing UI design for color-blind users?)

Best practice? WCAG 2.0 is your friend: have a text alternative that includes information that is conveyed by color differences in the image.

more:

http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/quickref/#qr-visual-audio-contrast-without-color

2 added a link to a tool to test specific website.
source | link

This should be very helpful - it's a tool that lets you simulate the appearance of colours for people with different color vision.

http://www.iamcal.com/toys/colors/

description: 1 in 12 people have some sort of color deficiency. When you're designing for the web, this means that 1 in 12 people might not be able to see your site. That's alot of people. This tool helps you simulate the appearance of our site's colors for people with different color visions. Select text and background colors from the palette below, then choose a color vision mode.

Best practice?To test your website, try this:

http://colorfilter.wickline.org/

Enter the URL for the web site you want to test, and select a color blindness type. The tool will then show you the web site like the color blind user will see it. (credit to Jørn E. Angeltveit for posting it in response to http://ux.stackexchange.com/questions/71/what-are-good-resources-for-testing-ui-design-for-color-blind-users)

Best practice? WCAG 2.0 is your friend. As usual with any images, have: have a text alternative that includes information that is conveyed by color differences in the image.

more:

http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/quickref/#qr-visual-audio-contrast-without-color

This should be very helpful - it's a tool that lets you simulate the appearance of colours for people with different color vision.

http://www.iamcal.com/toys/colors/

description: 1 in 12 people have some sort of color deficiency. When you're designing for the web, this means that 1 in 12 people might not be able to see your site. That's alot of people. This tool helps you simulate the appearance of our site's colors for people with different color visions. Select text and background colors from the palette below, then choose a color vision mode.

Best practice? WCAG 2.0 is your friend. As usual with any images, have a text alternative that includes information that is conveyed by color differences in the image.

more:

http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/quickref/#qr-visual-audio-contrast-without-color

This should be very helpful - it's a tool that lets you simulate the appearance of colours for people with different color vision.

http://www.iamcal.com/toys/colors/

description: 1 in 12 people have some sort of color deficiency. When you're designing for the web, this means that 1 in 12 people might not be able to see your site. That's alot of people. This tool helps you simulate the appearance of our site's colors for people with different color visions. Select text and background colors from the palette below, then choose a color vision mode.

To test your website, try this:

http://colorfilter.wickline.org/

Enter the URL for the web site you want to test, and select a color blindness type. The tool will then show you the web site like the color blind user will see it. (credit to Jørn E. Angeltveit for posting it in response to http://ux.stackexchange.com/questions/71/what-are-good-resources-for-testing-ui-design-for-color-blind-users)

Best practice? WCAG 2.0 is your friend: have a text alternative that includes information that is conveyed by color differences in the image.

more:

http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/quickref/#qr-visual-audio-contrast-without-color

1
source | link

This should be very helpful - it's a tool that lets you simulate the appearance of colours for people with different color vision.

http://www.iamcal.com/toys/colors/

description: 1 in 12 people have some sort of color deficiency. When you're designing for the web, this means that 1 in 12 people might not be able to see your site. That's alot of people. This tool helps you simulate the appearance of our site's colors for people with different color visions. Select text and background colors from the palette below, then choose a color vision mode.

Best practice? WCAG 2.0 is your friend. As usual with any images, have a text alternative that includes information that is conveyed by color differences in the image.

more:

http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/quickref/#qr-visual-audio-contrast-without-color