4 deleted 14 characters in body
source | link

Bells and Whistles

the things that something, especially a device or machine, has or does that are not necessary but that make it more exciting or interesting

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/bells+and+whistles

Please note, bells and whistles do not necessarily make noise. This term has been around since long before websites.

Chrome

In software design, folks used to talk about "Chrome" being the non-functional parts of the software that just looked nice. But "Chrome" pretty universally means the browser and its related technology now. Also the world Chrome was typicallyoften used negatively, as something that designers tended to include too much of. (And there's something to be said for being careful about that.)

Nielsen Norman Group defines chrome as follows:

'Chrome' is the user interface overhead that surrounds user data and web page content. Although chrome obesity can eat half of the available pixels, a reasonable amount enhances usability.

An example of chrome would be the clock that appears on Mac and Windows GUI screens. It’s generally useful, but generally not strictly relevant to the task at hand.

Bells and Whistles

the things that something, especially a device or machine, has or does that are not necessary but that make it more exciting or interesting

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/bells+and+whistles

Please note, bells and whistles do not necessarily make noise. This term has been around since long before websites.

Chrome

In software design, folks used to talk about "Chrome" being the non-functional parts of the software that just looked nice. But "Chrome" pretty universally means the browser and its related technology now. Also the world Chrome was typically used negatively, as something that designers tended to include too much of. (And there's something to be said for being careful about that.)

Nielsen Norman Group defines chrome as follows:

'Chrome' is the user interface overhead that surrounds user data and web page content. Although chrome obesity can eat half of the available pixels, a reasonable amount enhances usability.

An example of chrome would be the clock that appears on Mac and Windows GUI screens. It’s generally useful, but generally not strictly relevant to the task at hand.

Bells and Whistles

the things that something, especially a device or machine, has or does that are not necessary but that make it more exciting or interesting

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/bells+and+whistles

Please note, bells and whistles do not necessarily make noise. This term has been around since long before websites.

Chrome

In software design, folks used to talk about "Chrome" being the non-functional parts of the software that just looked nice. But "Chrome" pretty universally means the browser and its related technology now. Also the world Chrome was often used negatively, as something that designers tended to include too much of. (And there's something to be said for being careful about that.)

Nielsen Norman Group defines chrome as follows:

'Chrome' is the user interface overhead that surrounds user data and web page content. Although chrome obesity can eat half of the available pixels, a reasonable amount enhances usability.

An example of chrome would be the clock that appears on Mac and Windows GUI screens. It’s generally useful, but not strictly relevant to the task at hand.

3 added 481 characters in body
source | link

Bells and Whistles

the things that something, especially a device or machine, has or does that are not necessary but that make it more exciting or interesting

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/bells+and+whistles

Please note, bells and whistles do not necessarily make noise. This term has been around since long before websites.

Chrome

In software design, folks used to talk about "Chrome""Chrome" being the non-functional parts of the software that just looked nice. But "Chrome" pretty universally means the browser and its related technology now. Also the world Chrome was typically used negatively, as something that designers tended to include too much of. (And there's something to be said for being careful about that.)

Nielsen Norman Group defines chrome as follows:

'Chrome' is the user interface overhead that surrounds user data and web page content. Although chrome obesity can eat half of the available pixels, a reasonable amount enhances usability.

An example of chrome would be the clock that appears on Mac and Windows GUI screens. It’s generally useful, but generally not strictly relevant to the task at hand.

Bells and Whistles

the things that something, especially a device or machine, has or does that are not necessary but that make it more exciting or interesting

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/bells+and+whistles

Please note, bells and whistles do not necessarily make noise. This term has been around since long before websites.

Chrome

In software design, folks used to talk about "Chrome" being the non-functional parts of the software that just looked nice. But "Chrome" pretty universally means the browser and its related technology now. Also the world Chrome was typically used negatively, as something that designers tended to include too much of. (And there's something to be said for being careful about that.)

Bells and Whistles

the things that something, especially a device or machine, has or does that are not necessary but that make it more exciting or interesting

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/bells+and+whistles

Please note, bells and whistles do not necessarily make noise. This term has been around since long before websites.

Chrome

In software design, folks used to talk about "Chrome" being the non-functional parts of the software that just looked nice. But "Chrome" pretty universally means the browser and its related technology now. Also the world Chrome was typically used negatively, as something that designers tended to include too much of. (And there's something to be said for being careful about that.)

Nielsen Norman Group defines chrome as follows:

'Chrome' is the user interface overhead that surrounds user data and web page content. Although chrome obesity can eat half of the available pixels, a reasonable amount enhances usability.

An example of chrome would be the clock that appears on Mac and Windows GUI screens. It’s generally useful, but generally not strictly relevant to the task at hand.

2 added 457 characters in body
source | link

Bells and Whistles

the things that something, especially a device or machine, has or does that are not necessary but that make it more exciting or interesting

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/bells+and+whistles

Please note, bells and whistles do not necessarily make noise. This term has been around since long before websites.

Chrome

In software design, folks used to talk about "Chrome" being the non-functional parts of the software that just looked nice. But "Chrome" pretty universally means the browser and its related technology now. Also the world Chrome was typically used negatively, as something that designers tended to include too much of. (And there's something to be said for being careful about that.)

Bells and Whistles

the things that something, especially a device or machine, has or does that are not necessary but that make it more exciting or interesting

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/bells+and+whistles

Please note, bells and whistles do not necessarily make noise.

Bells and Whistles

the things that something, especially a device or machine, has or does that are not necessary but that make it more exciting or interesting

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/bells+and+whistles

Please note, bells and whistles do not necessarily make noise. This term has been around since long before websites.

Chrome

In software design, folks used to talk about "Chrome" being the non-functional parts of the software that just looked nice. But "Chrome" pretty universally means the browser and its related technology now. Also the world Chrome was typically used negatively, as something that designers tended to include too much of. (And there's something to be said for being careful about that.)

1
source | link