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Dec
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
16
awarded  Yearling
Dec
16
awarded  Explainer
Dec
16
comment Most User Friendly Color Picker
Yeah, but the slider in the second color picker only goes darker; you can't use it to lighten a color, or tone it with gray.
Dec
16
revised Most User Friendly Color Picker
no need for all the "tittle"s; misc. copyedits
Dec
16
suggested approved edit on Most User Friendly Color Picker
Dec
16
comment Most User Friendly Color Picker
Replied below A. Sim's answer, since I feel it belongs there.
Dec
16
comment Most User Friendly Color Picker
While I agree that most users would likely want to pick a hue (e.g. green) first, and then maybe tint or shade it down, I don't see how that makes the second color picker better than the others. On the contrary, the second design mixes the hue and tint into the same color wheel, so that if the user decides, say, that they want this green, but a little lighter, they'll have to guesstimate where on the wheel that will be and try aim their mouse carefully to avoid changing the hue too. The last two designs seem a lot more usable to me in that respect. (They're also direction-neutral.)
Dec
16
answered Most User Friendly Color Picker
Oct
29
comment When should you mark something as read?
That reminds me, I should probably remember to click that "mark as read" button the next time I'm on Facebook. :-/
Oct
29
comment When should you mark something as read?
@DanHenderson: Looking at the code, though, I'm fairly sure that's not a deliberate feature. (It mostly looks like just a side effect of not wanting to clear all the alert icons as soon as any dropdown is opened.) In any case, I don't think it's clearly documented or advertised anywhere, so it's at best a "hidden feature" for experienced users. It might also just be a bug, or perhaps a misbug.
Sep
23
comment Best practices to design a 404 error page
Technically, you can sometimes tell that it's your fault, e.g. if the request contains a Referer(sic) header pointing back to your site. Whether it's worth altering the error message for this special case is questionable; however, it's definitely worth logging at least. (Fortunately, most webservers do log that information by default.)
Jan
26
comment What cues can I use to nudge users away from setting extreme values on a slider?
@samgak: Could you edit that screenshot into your question above? I think it would help to see clearly what your sliders currently look like.
Jan
24
comment What cues can I use to nudge users away from setting extreme values on a slider?
@samgak: Since this is not a critical feature (the software remains perfectly usable even without it), using color cues is probably safe enough. Presumably, the intersection of the sets of people who are both a) colorblind, and b) dumb enough to crank the sliders to the max and complain about the results, is small enough to tolerate. But if you want to be sure, use a width cue also.
Jan
12
awarded  Caucus
Nov
13
comment Adding a “none of the above” option to a list of checkboxes
+1 for noting that, whatever we do on the client side, the input still needs to be validated on the server after being submitted.
Oct
19
awarded  Yearling
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
22
comment Does the Oxford Comma increase readability?
It's actually kind of hard to tell, but the way it sounds to me, when I try to speak you example sentence naturally, is that the gaps between "sausages" and "bacon" and between "bacon" and "eggs" are of fairly similar length, but the unstressed "and" falls into the second gap, partially filling it. (If "bacon and eggs" were a single phrase, like "services and support" in the example above, I'd read it all run together, as in "bacon-n'-eggs". Alas, that looks silly in writing.)
Jun
12
answered Will forcing response time to the average time as a minimum improve UX?