421 reputation
211
bio website lordscree.blogspot.com
location Bristol, UK
age 30
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen yesterday

Dec
19
accepted What's the terminology for bad practice around emulating browser functionality in your website?
Dec
18
awarded  Nice Question
Sep
23
awarded  Yearling
Sep
14
comment What's the terminology for bad practice around emulating browser functionality in your website?
Haha, +1, and touché
Sep
14
comment What's the terminology for bad practice around emulating browser functionality in your website?
Using your principle of least astonishment, would it not be better to design your site in a way that the browser's back buttons work as the user expects them to?
Sep
14
comment What's the terminology for bad practice around emulating browser functionality in your website?
+1 for consistency. This is the main reason I'm torn between appeasing the user (because I know he's kind-of right, for the reasons you mentioned), and sticking to my own guns because of the reasons given by @MattObee and the "Teach a man to fish" example. However, I intend to argue that it's better to be consistent with 99%* of other websites than to be consistent with a previous version of an old system... * bad science
Sep
14
awarded  Student
Sep
14
asked What's the terminology for bad practice around emulating browser functionality in your website?
May
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Apr
11
answered Could scaring users be good UX?
Mar
6
awarded  Critic
Mar
6
comment Would intentionally slowing down UI help to increase sales on shopping sites?
"slowing users down on purpose is a manipulative design pattern"... Supermarkets spend millions on layout design for the store for exactly this purpose (google.co.uk/…). It's not ethics, it's sales. I fail to see how ethics has anything to do with this question - people aren't being forced to shop at a particular online store
Mar
6
comment Would intentionally slowing down UI help to increase sales on shopping sites?
I disagree. If you take a shopping site like Play.com for example, where you have various offers dotted around the page peripherals, I can really see how slowing down the page interaction at certain points would have the user's eyes taking in the rest of the page while they wait for it to load. The number of times I've clicked something, then noticed something else and gone back to it... I can see this working.
Mar
6
comment Would intentionally slowing down UI help to increase sales on shopping sites?
+1 I love the unmasked cynicism of this question =D
Feb
29
answered Validating Phonewords/Vanity Numbers
Jan
6
comment Merging firstname/last name into one field
IMO no answer could be better.
Nov
11
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
9
revised How to discover what users NEED and not what they WANT?
added 3 characters in body
Nov
9
awarded  Supporter
Nov
9
awarded  Editor