1,919 reputation
157
bio website sleeplessgeek.blogspot.com
location Augusta, GA
age
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen Oct 10 at 16:20

I started learning web development with the most basic tools: Notepad and HTML. It was all just tinkering for a few years, then I dug into CSS, Javascript, PHP and MySQL at a job where those skills were needed. A couple of jobs later, I'm working in Ruby on Rails, using Rspec and Cucumber, and gearing up to work with Riak.


Mar
5
comment The Hamburger Icon - menu or drag affordance?
Got here by Googling the term after seeing this Tweet: twitter.com/jmspool/status/441224973047574528 I think it sums it up well. "The hamburger icon is the 2014 technique for providing mystery meat navigation. (And, thus, appropriately named.)"
Mar
4
comment What to call “Cancel” when “Cancel” is already the default action?
@KitGrose - I'd say "Keep Subscription" rather than "Don't cancel"
Mar
7
comment Would intentionally slowing down UI help to increase sales on shopping sites?
@ytk - grocery store A sometimes succeeds in selling me gum because they are slow, so I have to wait in line, and the gum is right next to me. So that's good for them, right? Maybe. But I hate waiting, so sometimes I go to grocery store B, which is faster, and A loses my business. That's my anecdotal viewpoint, but research is the best way to know what to do.
Mar
7
comment Would intentionally slowing down UI help to increase sales on shopping sites?
"you do wish the customers to take time to look at the art, rather than browsing through text description, reviews, related products etc". I still don't think you want to enforce a speed limit. An art gallery lets you walk through however you want, but strives to make each piece compelling enough that you'll want to pause, through quality, lighting, etc. In fact, being able to quickly skip pieces I don't like makes me more likely to find something I do like. As for distractions, you can ensure that the art remains large and central on-screen as I read any related text.
Mar
6
comment Would intentionally slowing down UI help to increase sales on shopping sites?
@LordScree - you clicked something. That means you gave them more information: "this thing is interesting to me." If the page loaded instantly, wouldn't you now be looking at even better targeted offers than before? In any case, the bottom line is that research backs up the "faster is better" point of view.
Dec
28
comment Any actual reason for complicated UIs?
There is a difference between complex and confusing. A cockpit control panel is necessarily complex because flying a plane is complex. A good UI there wouldn't be simple, but would make the most important information the most visible, the most often-used controls the most accessible, and the most "dangerous" ones difficult to press by accident. (No "eject the pilot" button next to the intercom button, for example.)
Oct
10
comment Should date validation allow “091011”?
@Bevan - I'd say that inconsistency makes the learning much curve harder. "You do it this way... but then you have to do this to get it to work in browser X... but that messes up browser Y unless you do that..." By comparison, writing server-side code is straightforward because there is one interpreter. If you did it wrong, you will know as soon as you run your code; you don't have to look at it in 10 different browsers and still get vague user feedback saying it's wrong.
Oct
7
comment Should date validation allow “091011”?
"Be liberal in what you accept" can actually backfire. Incorrect HTML markup is ambiguous; if browsers had historically rejected and refused to display it, coders would have learned to do it right. Instead they took a best guess how how to display it, and each one guessed differently. Then we got lots of bad legacy markup for which browsers had to maintain backwards compatability.