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visits member for 3 years
seen Mar 12 at 19:03

Apr
3
comment Should users be able to zoom in a responsive webdesign?
Not only is resolution not standard, but DPI is not standard. I couldn't tell you how many times I've wanted to Zoom out on a mobile website but was unable to.
Jan
15
comment Computer login with password only, without username
Keep in mind that having passwords only would also prevent you from disabling an account for too many bad logins.
Mar
6
awarded  Critic
Jan
31
comment Refusing a user permission to click a URL
@BenBrocka, Because links that just don't work without an explanation would be an annoyance. I find alttext type tooltips to not be effective. Now, any smart-tooltip that could provide a link or possibly just making the padlock click-able would be fine by me.
Jan
30
comment Refusing a user permission to click a URL
and how is "potentially creates noise and distraction" not harmful...?
Jan
30
comment Refusing a user permission to click a URL
@codeinthehole, then what's your argument to why it shouldn't be shown? if it's not harmful in the slightest, then I can't see why it shouldn't be shown. Notice, that if your argument concludes that showing useless links can have any sort of bad outcome, then it would be harmful.
Jan
30
comment Refusing a user permission to click a URL
+1, but I would still make it a black hyperlink, linking to information on where to obtain such access if you feel you need it.
Jan
30
comment Refusing a user permission to click a URL
@codeinthehole, I would argue those are the same. If it's not useful to show the content exists, then showing that it exists should be considered harmful
Jan
30
answered Refusing a user permission to click a URL
Jan
27
comment How long should a press-and-hold-button action be?
Of course, for phones, turning off the phone can be rather "risky". If this is done on accident, it's an inconvenience. This should be considered when choosing the length of the long press. If it's not risky, one second is likely more than enough.
Dec
30
comment Traffic lights: why yellow before green?
Whatever the reason, I wish we had this in USA. I am tired of looking at the side to look for when the crosstraffic light has turned yellow. Do I need it? No. But if you're impatient it's a nice FYI.
Dec
30
comment Any actual reason for complicated UIs?
I was doing bit of a reach to get examples. (obviously). Minimal designs are typically more well thought-out and therefore are less likely to have issues. On the other hand, "complicated" designs that are well thought-out rarely have issues either. The reason there is bias against complicated UIs is because then end up being the norm for quick and dirty designs... but that doesn't mean there is an issue with them by nature.
Dec
30
comment Any actual reason for complicated UIs?
Oh, I have a great one. The combine feature of windows 7 taskbar. switching to a program where you have multiple windows requires you to make two clicks that are far from each other. The OSX Dock has similar issues. These are terrible designs from my use case perspective. I want as much information available on my taskbar as possible and as few clicks as possible to get things done.
Dec
30
comment Any actual reason for complicated UIs?
You've never had software that's tedious to use? These aren't blantant examples but.. 1)OSX 2)Microsoft ribbon 3)evernote. I know I've used other software that are better examples but I usually run away from such a thing.
Dec
29
comment Any actual reason for complicated UIs?
A good minimal design hides features that are not used often. ie. google. But sometimes these features might be the ones you want. If a minimalistic design requires you to click 10 times to get an action done that you do 10 times a day.. well, thats a bad design (at least for your use case)
Dec
28
awarded  Commentator
Dec
28
comment Any actual reason for complicated UIs?
@CamiloMartin, while I agree to an extent, I'll also add that (in my inexperienced opinion), it seems like some of these customer service woudln't be able to "handle" things like hotkeys. Simple point and click with mass information on single screens seems better. I've seen circumstances where someone where I will show someone how to use an "advanced" feature like hotkeys to do something in 1/3 the time, but since they are so used to the previous method, they won't use it. "hotkeys" are just too "advanced" for them.
Dec
28
awarded  Editor
Dec
28
revised Any actual reason for complicated UIs?
added 1 characters in body
Dec
28
comment Any actual reason for complicated UIs?
+1, it really depends on the use case of the interface. Customer service reps need the most common functionailty available ASAP. Because of how often the App is used, they easily adapt to cluttered UIs. See my answer below for more elaboration ux.stackexchange.com/a/15508/7275