4,452 reputation
829
bio website alexfeinman.net
location Boston, MA
age
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen 2 days ago

I'm a UX specialist investigating analysis and design of multi-user interaction. I specialize in design of CLIs and GUIs for use by programmers, QEs, and release engineers.

My doctoral work centered around using discourse analysis techniques to understand design requirements for groupware. I am currently employed helping to design a complex versioning/building/testing system.

In my spare time, I write science fiction; my first novel Duplicate is available as an eBook, paperback, or hardcover. My second novel, We Were Gods is also available as an eBook or paperback. Yes, there's a fair amount of programming and user experience in each of them. ;)

My statements on these websites are not official statements from any employer of mine.


Mar
26
comment Should you concede to user demands that seem clearly inferior?
+1. Users often don't know why, and will make up lies if you press them for a reason, but they know what they don't like.
Mar
25
comment Are there usability problems with optgroup?
Have you tried asking the people giving the feedback what their reasons are? That would be an interesting conversation. Don't let them stay with "for no reason" (which, btw, is highly unlikely--it might be "for no GOOD reason" to you, but there's always a reason, and it might be good to the other person).
Mar
17
comment Are there PhD topics for user experience?
Experiences definitely differ here. While some came in with the same idea they left with, many of my cohort either had no idea--or had an idea only to discover their PhD ended up wildly different than what they'd originally aimed for.
Mar
13
comment Is there an established gradient of colors reflecting completeness of a form?
Red vs. Green presents a number of problems. They only mean "stop/go" in some cultures; and there is a sizeable red/green color-blind population.
Mar
13
comment Benefit of “Twisty bottom” ballpoint pens over “Clicky tops”
I can (and do) twist my twisty pens with one hand...
Mar
7
comment Should we fake succesful form submit, display result and then revert if some conditions are not met?
This technique is becoming widely used among sites, yes, especially on mobile apps--G+ and Facebook both seem to use it. Interestingly it also matches a conversational pattern among humans, where you presume you've been heard, and expect to get interrupted later if your message wasn't received right...
Mar
6
comment What is the expected result for mouse inputs in web based applications?
I think this is a very new trend--only in the past 2-3 years, as developers get more used to overriding the standard browser right-click menu.
Feb
27
comment How to handle settings which can be both set mechanically and via a computer?
Some of the old patterns there were pretty awful. For example, changing volume in software would persist until you accidentally nudged the hardware controls--at which point the volume would jump to the hardware-set leves, potentially blowing out your spreakers. So perhaps not the best source of positive lessons...
Jan
13
comment Why is everything becoming flatter?
You might also ask why everything became shiny and 3D in the 90s and 00s. The short answer: because technology supported it.
Jan
6
comment How to deal with very small droppable area in touch devices?
That sounds like it might be a good idea, but it's hard to tell from your answer. Can you expand what you mean?
Dec
26
comment Why electric car windows can be automatic for driver's window and manual for others?
It is the cheapest possible solution that complies with regulations.
Dec
18
comment Alternative to a lot of checkboxes
Can you give us any more detail? This does sound like a very arduous task of the sort humans are terrible at. Can any of it be automated? Can any of it be groups/aggregated into larger chunks?
Dec
16
comment Should an alphabetized list of colleges have 'University of' schools under 'U'?
Why not put them in both spots? Also--for most applications it makes sense to have a long list be searchable/filterable, in which case it sort of doesn't matter where they are.
Nov
6
comment What's the best practice of showing a lot of text inside Android Fragment
Why are you showing this list? Why would the user need to see all of this information all at once?
Nov
4
comment Could the agile development process be in detriment of the UX for early adopters?
That's what app store reviews are for these days. ;)
Oct
23
comment Looking for “hard-to-accidently-press” button conventions
Just use a normal 'menu' icon (e.g., the hamburger icon) but when it's pressed, give some indication (a pie slice that fills in and glows brighter?) that it needs to be held.
Oct
17
comment Real-life UX: What's wrong with our coffee maker?
The machine I'm referring to also fluffs the milk internally--somehow. I imagine it uses some sort of awful milk substitute, though.
Oct
16
comment Real-life UX: What's wrong with our coffee maker?
You've got a mismatch between technology and users--you've got occasional users using an expert-level system. One option is to replace it with a system that is more usable by your "perpetual intermediates", like the dreaded K-cup, or one of the new machines that grinds coffee on the fly.
Oct
3
comment Up & down arrows vs Drag & drop for reordering elements
Keyboard short-cuts--great point. But a drag-n-drop interface can provide these if you give the user some way of selecting an item in the list, say by tapping or clicking.
Oct
3
comment Up & down arrows vs Drag & drop for reordering elements
True! Though you've now added some ambiguity to the interface--and you'll need to have some sort of drag affordance, unless you want users to find it purely by chance, so that will also take up extra screen real estate.