7,344 reputation
11028
bio website quietstars.com
location England, United Kingdom
age 44
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen 4 hours ago

Adrian is passionate about building effective teams and great products. He co-founded Quietstars to help companies do that using Lean, Agile and UX practices.

You'll find him working with startup and product development teams — doing everything from coaching & teaching to hands on UX & dev work. With more than 15 years experience working with startups, established businesses and agencies Adrian is an active member of the Agile and Lean UX communities. He's also a mentor for Lean Startup Machine and speakup.io.

You'll often find him ranting in a corner of the bar about how agile, business and user experience folk need to play nice together. Be kind and buy him whisky.


Aug
23
comment How to tell Facebook users don't be afraid to sign in?
++ x lots to this answer. Facebook only login == I don't use the site.
Aug
20
comment Can UX without research really be called UX?
I'd actually disagree with that moderately ;-) When working with agile teams I'd much rather involve them with the research work, rather than try and do it all before hand. Good agile teams work incrementally. UX research folk work incrementally. Having both work together is stupidly effective in my experience.
Aug
14
comment Guidelines on using hyphenation in interactive design
Agreed - but the holes & rivers problem goes away if you don't right justify — and the driver for filling all the horizontal space by combining right-justified text & hyphenation on the paper is — well — often to get the most out of the paper.
Aug
13
comment Guidelines on using hyphenation in interactive design
Yeah — but that's just me guessing. Wouldn't be the first time my hunches are crushed after watching what people actually do with a UI. Test it. See what happens ;-)
Aug
9
comment what is the critical mass for design research
I think we have very different definitions of design research / interviewing ;) For me it's all about understand users, discovering needs, etc. It's all generative. Usability testing, on the other hand, is evaluative. It's about finding out whether something we already built is well or badly. The former is open. The latter is closed. Having done both they're very different methods to me, and have very different requirements on recruiting.
Aug
6
comment what is the critical mass for design research
The Nielsen piece is about the numbers for usability testing — not the numbers for interviewing.
Jun
11
comment What are the pros/cons of performing usability testing with multiple participants simultaneously?
In my experience two achieving more than one is only a problem if the team is over-focussed on task completion during testing. Because you can still see the problems happen. In the scenario you described it's obvious that there is a problem - since the participants nicely articulated it for you ;-)
Jun
1
comment How usable are outlined buttons?
I dunno ;) I'll ask… Not sure if the old ones were kept.
May
28
comment Should GitHub's “Fork” button not be a button?
The downside is an extra level of annoyance every time I fork. That little "yes I am sure - that's why I clicked on the button" that rolls around my head. And which quickly becomes an automatic click, removing the value in stopping accidental clicks... which so far we have no evidence for actually existing ;-)
May
28
comment Should GitHub's “Fork” button not be a button?
I agree with IMSo. I'd question whether forks without contributions are necessarily accidental. I regularly fork stuff I'm interested with to play with locally, but end up not doing anything with it. I've never forked anything accidentally that I can recall.
May
25
comment Correct Placement of Newsletter Sign Up?
This is exactly the right way to think about it. Where you place the newsletter depends on how important it is for you, and where the user is in their journey.
May
25
comment Correct Placement of Newsletter Sign Up?
"Users won't signup the very first time they visit your site." — That is incorrect in my experience. From looking at when newsletter sign ups happen on multiple sites it's actually fairly common for people to sign up on a first visit. They've visited your site because they have an interest in it's content, and a newsletter is a fairly well understood way of remaining engaged.
May
25
comment Variable Password Requirements Help
@Renaud Many are hacked due to insufficient length. Those database hacks are (mostly) stealing encrypted passwords. Having shorter passwords means that those encrypted passwords are easier to crack. See lockdown.co.uk/?pg=combi for some out-of-date numbers.
May
25
comment Variable Password Requirements Help
@JonW The problem with password strength indicators is that most people misunderstand what a strong password is. They tend to add more "odd" characters rather than increase the length - when length is often the "best" option.
Apr
24
comment What is a good name length limit?
Then possibly what you want is not a "name" field by a "how would you like to be addressed?" field?
Apr
2
comment Does empty space really keep users from scrolling?
In addition to A/B testing - some good old fashioned usability testing can quickly show whether it will be a problem.
Mar
29
comment The effect of black header
See ux.stackexchange.com/questions/28546/why-choose-dark-navbars/… ;-)
Mar
13
comment Benefit of “Twisty bottom” ballpoint pens over “Clicky tops”
Ah - good point. Didn't read it that way. The "harder to open accidentally" still applies ;-)
Mar
7
comment Psychological pricing vs. being fair?
If you've not got the numbers then you never going to know what's going to work best. So best to focus the energy spent on figuring out exactly the right copy for the sign up page to the parts of the service that are getting you more people ;-)
Feb
11
comment Why does the Facebook registration page require you to retype the email and NOT the password?
I don't personally think it's worth the -1 - but Quora doesn't let you see the material without logging in.