7,166 reputation
11028
bio website quietstars.com
location England, United Kingdom
age 44
visits member for 4 years
seen 9 hours ago

Adrian is passionate about building effective teams and great products. He co-founded Quietstars to help companies do that using Lean, Agile and UX practices.

You'll find him working with startup and product development teams — doing everything from coaching & teaching to hands on UX & dev work. With more than 15 years experience working with startups, established businesses and agencies Adrian is an active member of the Agile and Lean UX communities. He's also a mentor for Lean Startup Machine and speakup.io.

You'll often find him ranting in a corner of the bar about how agile, business and user experience folk need to play nice together. Be kind and buy him whisky.


Nov
25
comment Does animating statistical data make it easier to understand?
++ to this. Hans Rosling's animations are showing you things that you cannot see on a static graph. To extend Tufte's metaphor they're 'data animation' not 'decoration animation' (cf infovis-wiki.net/index.php/Data-Ink_Ratio)
Nov
25
comment What's a good modification/alternative to differentiating categories by colour when the number of categories grows large?
@Tyler - References? I've just shown #191919 (90% black) and #33333 (80% black) squares to four people and nobody was able to successfully differentiate them without having them side-by-side for comparison...
Nov
25
answered Best way to label ranges of values
Nov
24
comment Login using one of two mutually exclusive fields
There is a downside to the single field option though. You cannot supply hints on the input type that would supply content-specific data entry for numbers vs email addresses (e.g. the different iPhone keyboards you get).
Nov
24
answered Usability testing and responsive web design
Nov
24
comment Product design materials
For example - what's the right number of materials for a chess board. I've seen chess boards that vary from printed black-and-white squares on a piece of paper, to a lovely piece that was made of 64 different kinds of wood / wood-treatments that was a demo piece for a furniture restorers skills. Both were the right choice for the context.
Nov
24
comment Product design materials
It may or may not be groovy depending on what the design goals were. There isn't "a" rule. The number of materials depends on the interplay of dozens of things.
Nov
24
answered How do you determine the order of tasks in a usability test?
Nov
24
answered What's a good modification/alternative to differentiating categories by colour when the number of categories grows large?
Nov
24
answered Product design materials
Nov
18
comment A/B test shows unexplainable winner for a remote goal
++ to this Type I error is a very likely explanation if you're running lots of tests.
Nov
18
comment How many images should a slideshow carousel rotate automatically?
I would second what @AlexeyPegov said. In every usability test I've done with carousels the people using the site have either not taken notice of them, disliked them, or not actually followed up on anything past the first image. Yet to see them work in a useful way. Don't know why people use 'em.
Nov
17
comment Simulate Eye-tracking by Photoshop filters?
@GaëlLaurans - Yup. Completely right. As I said "mild oversimplification" ;-) And obviously some cues for gaze path must be coming from the peripheral vision - motion across the visual field being the most obvious example. But I think that things like the F-pattern show that there's a lot of higher-level drivers for gaze path too. Visual frequency is, I think, unlikely to be a useful cue by itself.
Nov
17
answered A/B test shows unexplainable winner for a remote goal
Nov
17
answered Where is the best way to approach hallway usability testing?
Nov
16
comment Simulate Eye-tracking by Photoshop filters?
@FrankL Finally, we know from observing eye tracking results, that our attention is being driven by much higher-level abstractions (e.g. our tendency to pay attention to faces, the F-pattern in left-right-top-bottom reading cultures, etc.) unrelated to the frequency info in the image.
Nov
16
comment Simulate Eye-tracking by Photoshop filters?
@FrankL The the second is comparing low/medium/high frequencies so they are basically talking about stuff that's coming via the fovea and, by definition, what the eye has already looked at. So no input on eye tracking behaviour their either. I'm sure that frequency will have an effect - but it's going to be a complex feedback driven one based on the model generated via the processing in the visual cortex.
Nov
16
comment Simulate Eye-tracking by Photoshop filters?
@FrankL The point I was trying to make was that those papers aren't (as far as I can see) talking about low frequencies steering the eye in the way that eye tracking studies are normally used. They're talking about figuring out the model for how different frequencies are integrated. The first is talking about its effect on slow-pursuit eye movements - which are different from the fast "unconscious" saccades that eye tracking studies normally focus on (I don't have access to the full paper so may be missing something).
Nov
16
revised Simulate Eye-tracking by Photoshop filters?
minor grammer/flow tweak
Nov
16
comment Simulate Eye-tracking by Photoshop filters?
@FrankL All eye tracking heat maps are is a view of how much total time was spent "focussed" on areas. They're often aggregates from multiple users. They don't let you know if somebody comprehended what they were looking at, or whether the gaze was conscious or unconscious. E.g. I've seen eye tracking studies that showed many people fixated on an area, but their behaviour and follow up questions showed nobody had actually read the text (it was in a banner blindness spot). This sort of thing is why I rank eye tracking as one of the least useful general user testing tools ;)