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824
bio website cellio.livejournal.com
location Pittsburgh PA
age
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen May 26 at 17:20

Nov
21
comment Why are normal water coolers so low?
Well, coolers have been that height for longer than the ADA has existed, so it's not just ADA. As a shorter person who has sometimes replaced the 5-gallon jugs on these things, I would certainly balk at having to lift it a foot or so higher.
Nov
19
comment Why do people mount TVs so high on the wall in their homes?
You make many good points. Is it just that flat-panels now allow us to put TVs "where we've always wanted them, but you can't wall-mount a CRT"? Older TVs often sat on stands/cabinets, putting them out of bumping-into range and not precluding under-TV storage. Did we lean back on our couches less then while cursing our inability to put the TV higher?
Oct
14
comment Why do public restrooms place the paper holders so low?
I just tried an experiment (because hey, I'm wearing jeans and a t-shirt today, and I was alone, and for science!), and from inside one stall, in order to reach the paper in the next one over, I had to lie on the floor and reach through and up.
Oct
13
comment Why do public restrooms place the paper holders so low?
Interesting -- I never thought about interactions with grab-bars.
Oct
8
comment Why do public restrooms place the paper holders so low?
Oh, good point. In this case the holder holds two normal-sized rolls (one above the other), so it's still pretty low. But you're right that others are much bigger. (Photo pending.)
Oct
8
comment Why do public restrooms place the paper holders so low?
At the risk of TMI, this question was prompted by a work restroom where leaning forward triggers the auto-flush. Whoops, so much for our efforts toward being green!
Jun
13
comment Why is the user experience of licence agreements always so terrible?
Think about how bad that "interminable" scrolling would be with a bigger font. Given that (a) they tend to be wordy (lawyers, as DA01 said) so (b) people don't read them, designers see them as a necessary hurdle, not something that's worth making nice.
Jun
10
comment When is the best time to deploy operating system updates?
Do you need to control this, or can you let the user choose the time? (Granted, I may be the example for why you don't want to do this; I've had the IT "updates ready; reboot required" message sitting off the edge of my screen for a week now.)
Apr
29
comment Should marking a chat message as spam automatically ignore the user?
A pattern I've seen is, upon marking something as spam, being asked "do you want to ignore this user?". So your system can ask, but you shouldn't take actions unilaterally on the user's behalf, for the reasons given in this answer.
Feb
11
comment All my users are from Afghanistan; or, how to get users to correctly fill out a form
@SamPierceLolla ah yes, I see the problem now -- the question text and the form differ. (By the way, if you want somebody to receive a notice of a comment, use @ before the name like I did here. I didn't receive an alert about your comment but just stumbled across it.)
Feb
10
comment All my users are from Afghanistan; or, how to get users to correctly fill out a form
@SamPierceLolla, I based that on this from the question: The countries are listed in a drop-down box with a default choice that says "Choose a country". The problem is that about 1/3 of our users select the first country on the list which is Afghanistan." We could as easily ask how this answerer knows that, once forced into the drop-down, people will actually choose the correct answer, by the way.
Feb
8
comment All my users are from Afghanistan; or, how to get users to correctly fill out a form
How does your first suggestion help? They'll just take the first one on the list as they do now; inserting "please select" as an option doesn't change that.
Feb
8
comment All my users are from Afghanistan; or, how to get users to correctly fill out a form
Which is the bigger barrier: making users select a country, or making users figure out how to correct it when you guessed wrong? I wasn't exactly thrilled recently when, for who-knows-what reason, a site assumed I was German and adjusted the language accordingly... it was kinda hard to find and fix the relevant setting in a language I don't read. (OP isn't talking about changing language based on location, but others do.) Making a guess is fine (I suggested that in my answer), but only if the user then confirms it.
Jan
30
comment All my users are from Afghanistan; or, how to get users to correctly fill out a form
@Nrgdallas, it does require careful wording of that notice, tailored to the expected user base. (You'd probably explain it differently on a web-development forum versus a photo-hosting site.)
Jan
8
comment Why is embedded help not popular?
Contextual help is more expensive to develop and especially maintain than "plain old help" is. And you're probably not going to ditch your plain old help, so you end up with the help page/manual/document for general reading and either tagging or a copy to support the contextual snippets. This is hard to do well and more expensive than just publishing the doc as a unit.
Dec
25
comment What are the best practices on religious holidays?
Yes, this. If you're a religious business then go ahead and use your religion's norms for these things; if I call a Jewish bookstore I expect to be greated with "shana tova" near Rosh Hashana no matter who I am, and if I call a Christian store I'll expect a "Merry Christmas" around now. But if you sell widgets, why do you need to do anything special at all? Holidays don't compel you to acknowledge them. (Hmm, I wonder if anybody has done a user study on this.)
Dec
25
comment What are the best practices on religious holidays?
Trying to guess religion based on geography may be right most of the time, but when it's wrong it'll be terribly wrong. It's one thing for a minority to think everybody got the same inapplicable-to-him greeting; it's worse if he finds out that you did adjust but, from his POV, got it wrong.
Nov
26
comment Should UX design consider how things behave when they are broken?
Is your question, then, about the relative priority of this consideration among all the other UX concerns ("how important is...?")? I'm not trying to criticize, just refine -- I think it's an interesting area, and not just because I recently replaced an otherwise-perfectly-good keyboard because the paint and "locator bumps" wore off...
Nov
26
comment Should UX design consider how things behave when they are broken?
Most of your users aren't using a brand-new device most of the time, right? I mean, if you're designing kleenex maybe you don't care, but for anything durable, this seems obvious to me. Should this question be recast from a yes/no query to one asking how to do that?
Nov
9
comment Is Microsoft's Ribbon UI really that great, from a usability perspective?
That's the motivation; do we know if it actually worked? That is, has anybody done usability studies of the ribbon, comparing discoverability to the prior version?