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5h
answered How to handle the cover when a photo album opens straight to the lightbox?
5h
comment How to handle the cover when a photo album opens straight to the lightbox?
@Firsh If you were holding a physical photo album, would you expect the cover image to be the first one you see as well? I would guess not. The cover image is to get attention and make you want to look at the album. undoubtedly you will have some people who may want to jump to the larger version of the cover image, but you would have the same problem with a physical album (where you likely have text and other things on the cover blocking some of the image).
7h
comment Dropdown option order best practices when not using alpha sorting
Been open long enough, marking this as the best answer as it backs up with the article, though Salman Ali's & krychu's answers below are also in the same vein with similar reasoning.
7h
accepted Dropdown option order best practices when not using alpha sorting
7h
comment Dropdown option order best practices when not using alpha sorting
The issue I have with this answer is it first questions the use of the control, when that isn't the question, nor is their enough design described to suggest alternative designs. It explicitly states, when using a dropdown, what is the order. You then go into how to improve the dropdown (e.g. using a select2 type control with search built in) which again completely ignores the question that is focused, intentionally, on how to order items. Not sure what your issue with dropdowns is, but perhaps you should take a step back from your dislike of them as it is coloring your design choices :)
Oct
8
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
18
comment Are there any UX Patterns or research that support Mac OS treating standard dropdowns (selects) as modal like interaction?
@jazZRo, I think the discussion of should clicks into the inactive window/application click-through is a different discussion, as user expectations may be different, and it is easier to ignore mentally what you are clicking on, because you are just trying to bring the window to focus so you can do something else. The question above focuses mainly on the interaction with the active application, with lack of visual feedback. It does cover that on Mac OS all clicks are ignored, including clicks to change window focus, but that is less the point and can still be separated from click-through.
Jun
19
comment Are there any UX Patterns or research that support Mac OS treating standard dropdowns (selects) as modal like interaction?
Nathan, yes everything shouldn't be modal. The question above was why did Apple chose to take a previously non-modal action and turn it modal. (Secondary is their choice not to give any visual indication it was). I'll also note that at least some of your examples aren't modals. e.g. Windows Start Menu, Selects (outside of OSX), etc. Actions click through and are not canceled/prevented as would happen in a modal that closes when you click in the "gray" area.
Jun
17
comment Are there any UX Patterns or research that support Mac OS treating standard dropdowns (selects) as modal like interaction?
@NathanRabe I think you misunderstand, the expectation is that clicking outside of a select indeed closes it. The issue is that in OS X all other actions (hover, etc.) are suppressed with no modal underlay to indicate. This to me is confusing to a users (previous) mental model, with no visual indication that the choice is modal. Per the interaction in OS X the user would not be able to check a box elsewhere to affect the select (though I question that interaction anyway). But yes clicking anywhere other than the dropdown should close it, the question is simply do you treat it as modal or
May
17
awarded  Yearling
Apr
15
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
11
awarded  Good Question
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
16
awarded  Popular Question
May
17
awarded  Yearling
Jan
15
comment Are there any UX Patterns or research that support Mac OS treating standard dropdowns (selects) as modal like interaction?
Certainly preventing miss-clicks for destructive actions is a consideration but this is why destructive actions generally must be confirmed or can be undone. I think if this is the only reason they did this, it is throwing out usability and changing the mental model of the user for a corner case. It assumes the user isnt looking where they click, and they happen to click on an undesirable undo-able action. Switching windows probably has a higher case of this, but preventing click-through when switching application windows should be dealt with on its own, not only in this case.
Jan
14
comment Are there any UX Patterns or research that support Mac OS treating standard dropdowns (selects) as modal like interaction?
Yes, I get the point on Mobile Devices, there is limited space, the way you provide input is different, etc. However none of this supports why you would do this on a desktop browser when none of these concerns apply. (as you note in the end of your answer).
Jan
9
comment Are there any UX Patterns or research that support Mac OS treating standard dropdowns (selects) as modal like interaction?
@DA01 Good feedback, I have adjusted some of the wording as you suggested.
Jan
9
revised Are there any UX Patterns or research that support Mac OS treating standard dropdowns (selects) as modal like interaction?
Including feedback on wording
Jan
9
comment Are there any UX Patterns or research that support Mac OS treating standard dropdowns (selects) as modal like interaction?
@DA01 Happy to alter phrasing, but I am refering to a modal interaction rather than specifically a modal window which I believe you are comparing it to. I would point out the not all modal windows require action within the window itself to dismiss it. For instance many photo galleries are designed to dismiss the modal by clicking outside of the photo window itself. Things in Mac OS such as the disclosure panels that would slide down from the top of a page, do not darken the screen, but are still modal windows. Modal vs non-modal really hinges on if it blocks interaction with the application