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comment Are there any UX Patterns or research that support Mac OS treating standard dropdowns (selects) as modal like interaction?
Certainly preventing miss-clicks for destructive actions is a consideration but this is why destructive actions generally must be confirmed or can be undone. I think if this is the only reason they did this, it is throwing out usability and changing the mental model of the user for a corner case. It assumes the user isnt looking where they click, and they happen to click on an undesirable undo-able action. Switching windows probably has a higher case of this, but preventing click-through when switching application windows should be dealt with on its own, not only in this case.
Jan
14
comment Are there any UX Patterns or research that support Mac OS treating standard dropdowns (selects) as modal like interaction?
Yes, I get the point on Mobile Devices, there is limited space, the way you provide input is different, etc. However none of this supports why you would do this on a desktop browser when none of these concerns apply. (as you note in the end of your answer).
Jan
9
comment Are there any UX Patterns or research that support Mac OS treating standard dropdowns (selects) as modal like interaction?
@DA01 Good feedback, I have adjusted some of the wording as you suggested.
Jan
9
revised Are there any UX Patterns or research that support Mac OS treating standard dropdowns (selects) as modal like interaction?
Including feedback on wording
Jan
9
comment Are there any UX Patterns or research that support Mac OS treating standard dropdowns (selects) as modal like interaction?
@DA01 Happy to alter phrasing, but I am refering to a modal interaction rather than specifically a modal window which I believe you are comparing it to. I would point out the not all modal windows require action within the window itself to dismiss it. For instance many photo galleries are designed to dismiss the modal by clicking outside of the photo window itself. Things in Mac OS such as the disclosure panels that would slide down from the top of a page, do not darken the screen, but are still modal windows. Modal vs non-modal really hinges on if it blocks interaction with the application
Jan
8
revised Are there any UX Patterns or research that support Mac OS treating standard dropdowns (selects) as modal like interaction?
Adding information on trying interaction within Mac OS and what version
Jan
8
comment Are there any UX Patterns or research that support Mac OS treating standard dropdowns (selects) as modal like interaction?
@DA01 As for screenshots, as they use a transparent mask, there isnt much to show. And I dont have anything to take a timed screenshot to show the lack of hover effects. The user is not really informed they are in a modal mode other than any click other than to select an option in the dropdown is ignored and only closes the dropdown. As with the definition of modal window above, this to me fits with my definition of modal. I can not use the main application (or any other) until the current interface (or window as the dropdown menu is technically a window) has been used or dismissed.
Jan
8
comment Are there any UX Patterns or research that support Mac OS treating standard dropdowns (selects) as modal like interaction?
@DA01 I am on Mac OS 10.9, if you go to | w3schools.com/tags/tryit.asp?filename=tryhtml_select | and simply open the select box, now try to do anything else before making a selection or closing the select box. For instance try to change tabs. Notice nothing happens on first click. Try changing apps by clicking one in the background, ignored. Hover over your bookmark bar, notice no hover effect. These are all objects outside of the browser, yet apple makes the interaction modal while the dropdown is open. If it doesn't happen for you then 10.9 may be the first version.
Jan
8
comment Are there any UX Patterns or research that support Mac OS treating standard dropdowns (selects) as modal like interaction?
@DA01 I confirmed this on Mac OS (latest version) itself in both chrome, and safari. I have searched and can't find any mention of discussion on them changing this, but if you have an up to date machine you can see it for yourself. This happens on vanilla select-boxes (I ensured that by using a W3C schools example). I am unsure which version of Mac OS first introduced this. I have to admit I use a Mac at home (PC at work) and had not noticed the change, though I only recently upgraded the OS.
Jan
8
comment Are there any UX Patterns or research that support Mac OS treating standard dropdowns (selects) as modal like interaction?
@MattLavoie Modal as I am using it is refering to the interface entering into a mode where the user must interact with the current item before interacting with the main application. In this case the select-box does not allow the user to interact with any other element until it is closed. Such as with the definition of a modal window: "...a child window that requires users to interact with it before they can return to operating the parent application, thus preventing the workflow on the application main window" (from: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modal_window) a gray overlay is not needed.
Jan
6
comment Are there any UX Patterns or research that support Mac OS treating standard dropdowns (selects) as modal like interaction?
@MattLavoie You must use one of the customized dropdowns (In the first example it shows a standard select, and then what it turns into) Click on the second dropdown and then scroll up (if needed) and hover over one of the buttons or links. You should notice it does not trigger any hover effects making them appear disabled. Now click on one of them. Nothing happens, reinforcing that they are disabled. However, now notice after you clicked the hover effect is triggered, click a second time to use the button.
Jan
6
asked Are there any UX Patterns or research that support Mac OS treating standard dropdowns (selects) as modal like interaction?
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22
awarded  Good Question
May
21
comment Handling space constrained interfaces with many meta data options
Geared to more adv users (Data previously got in via XML before the timeline builder was made). The interface also walks users how to right click to access the existing options. We are now adding in more complex options, hence the question. The click-fest is also reduced by a duplicate option. The point of the builder is to create the timeline, sort the objects, set time, and set the advanced options. Having separate screens would seem to make it harder to use as context is important. Additionally think more video timeline, less facebook timeline, though potentially both share the issue.
May
21
revised Handling space constrained interfaces with many meta data options
added 346 characters in body; edited title
May
21
comment Handling space constrained interfaces with many meta data options
@3nafish Can you point me to where lists are verboten? Having some answer, "Generally simple form elements, such as text inputs and dropdowns works well do to the size constraints of a context menu..." yes does list out the type of inputs as that is necessary, however the question isn't saying, hey list all the types of cookies you like. The whole concept of best practices is a list. At this point if the question format gods feel like closing the question then, fine, I can debate the issue on meta.